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Legendary Civil Rights Leader James Lawson Assembles Institute on Nonviolent Civil Resist

Portland, Ore., will be the site of a sixth assembly of a uniquely acclaimed program that prepares social justice advocates for effective civil resistance campaigns on a host of socio-political crises and predicaments across the nation. The Institute meets for portions of five days, starting Wednesday, April 24, 6-9 p.m. with a public talk by Dr. Lawson, Native American Center, Portland State University, to which the public is invited.  http://jameslawsoninstitute.org/2019portland/
"Building an Escalating Intergenerational U.S. Nonviolent Movement"

Legendary Civil Rights Leader c, in Portland, Oregon, April 24-28

 http://jameslawsoninstitute.org/2019portland


The James Lawson Institute, named for the ordained United Methodist Church minister who advised and led several successful civil resistance campaigns at the height of the modern Civil Rights Movement, will be held April 24-28 in Portland, Oregon.Leaders, organizers, scholar-practitioners, and activists who want to improve their strategy, methods, and mastery required for successful justice campaigns voluntarily apply.



"Few grasp that nonviolent direct action requires planning, preparation, strategizing, recruiting, outreach, messaging and all the mechanisms needed for a campaign, including fierce discipline," said the Reverend Dr. James M. Lawson in announcing the Institute in Portland. "This doesn't happen spontaneously. It must be done systematically."



A close colleague and friend of the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., Dr. Lawson led and guided some of the most capable campaigns of the 1960s and 1970s. Most notably, he organized sit-in campaigns at racially segregated lunch counters in Nashville, TN, which ultimately led to desegregation of those facilities and other public accommodations.



Dr. Lawson's last five-day Institute was held at Ohio Wesleyan University in mid-summer 2018, in central Ohio, when he convened a program focused on Power and Struggle.



Participants in the Lawson Institutes start by focusing on the history of nonviolent action that has been found wherever scholars have searched for evidence of social movements. They will learn both the theory and practice of nonviolent struggle from case studies, planning tools, exercises and skits, and research, taught by a faculty of experienced scholar practitioners and facilitators.



The Institute's teaching staff and facilitators contend that the spotlight has not been sufficiently turned onto the richness of U.S. history, yesterday and today. Thousands of nonviolent campaigns and drives during the 18th to 20th centuries produced tangible results for abolition of slavery, establishment of tenant rights, ending child labor, recognition of an 8-hour work day, nonviolent organizing for strikes and economic boycotts by the labor movement in seeking basic rights for organizing for labor unions, prison reform, the women's vote, and even organizing electric power.



The Institute's partners include the International Center on Nonviolent Conflict as an advisory partner, the Liberty Hill Foundation in Los Angeles, the Nathan Cummings Foundation, the Open Society Foundations, the Youth Engagement Fund and the Stewart Mott Foundation.



The Institute meets for portions of five days, starting Wednesday, April 24, 6-9 p.m. with a public talk by Dr. Lawson, Native American Center, Portland State University, to which the public is invited.



The Institute's program concentrates on core elements for effective civil resistance campaigns:

>> Building an Escalating Intergenerational U.S. Nonviolent Movement—Inclusive of Women, Native Americans, African Americans, Hispanic Americans, and Other;

>> How Women a Century ago Changed President Wilson's Policy on the Women's Vote;

>> Strategy, Tactics, and Methods in Nonviolent Struggles;
>> How and Why the U.S. Freedom Movement Has Inspired Campaigns Worldwide;

>> Women in Nonviolent Struggles; and

>> Communication and Language for the "New Emerging Society"



Interested parties may apply for enrollment on the Institute's website through March 10: www.jameslawsoninstitute.org

Applications received after March 10 may also be considered.

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MORE PORTLAND INFO:
 http://jameslawsoninstitute.org/2019portland/

PSU PROGRAM SCHEDULE:
 link to jameslawsoninstitute.org

Contact:
Daniel Lee at  daniel.lee@jameslawsoninstitute.orgor (310) 936-7593

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As a small nonprofit teaching institute, the Lawson Institute sponsors periodic learning opportunities for individuals who are already involved in contemporary nonviolent struggles in the United States or have purpose and reason to learn its theories and methods.

The forthcoming institute convenes in Portland, Oregon, April 24 - April 28, 2019.

The term "nonviolent action" is one of the many English-language terms coined by Mohandas K. Gandhi that we use today, referring to what he called a method, process, or technique of struggle. The phenomenon of nonviolent struggle goes back to the ancient world and has been found wherever researchers have searched for it. It is not "the opposite of violence." It uses a form of power that is universal, sometimes called social power, referring to influences and pressures that can be applied by groups to achieve objectives. It is also called "nonviolent direct action", because it does not rely on officials, agencies, representatives, or standard institutions of government or politics; instead it takes the group action directly to the cause of the distress or oppression.

The Preamble to the 1776 United States Declaration of Independence holds that governments obtain "their just powers from the consent of the governed." In other words, the people's power can be withdrawn. Nonviolent struggles seeking justice and relief from oppression have time and again relied on "noncooperation" with the source of the wrong in organizing the withdrawing of cooperation and obedience. Withholding the "consent" cited in the Preamble is often at the core of nonviolent resistance.

The Lawson Institute periodically assembles scholar practitioners, leaders, organizers, and activists who are committed to pursuing their goals through nonviolent action to study and practice together. With Dr. Lawson's close involvement, JLI is a unique setting where one can learn the history, theories, and practice of nonviolent action, including the basics of strategy, tactics, and method. It is not, however, an educational environment for debating violence and nonviolence. JLI convenings focus on knowledge and effective application of nonviolent civil resistance.

homepage: homepage: http://jameslawsoninstitute.org