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Lake Oswego Pastor Busted For Illegal Transfer Of Rifle Purchased To Destroy In 'Protest'

[ Perfection! Anti-gunner attempts anti-gun "demonstration" and is foiled by Oregon's brand-new 2015 anti-gun 'private sale law. ]

Jeremy Lucas, the Lake Oswego reverend who made national news last week when he announced that he would destroy an AR-15 he won in a raffle, may have run afoul of the law when he gave the gun to a parishioner for safe keeping without performing a background check.

Whether or not Lucas will be prosecuted remains to be seen, according to a spokesman for the Oregon State Police, who are looking into the case.

2 weeks ago, Lucas saw that a girls softball league was holding a raffle to sponsor the team's travel to a tournament in California. The grand prize: an AR-15 rifle.

Using $3,000 of discretionary funds from the church, he bought as many raffle tickets as he could in the hopes of winning the rifle, which he did.

The brouhaha started when Lucas announced his plans to destroy the rifle. After garnering plenty of local press, the Washington Post picked up the story and Lucas told the paper he had picked up the rifle from a gun store, but had left the rifle at the home of a "responsible gun owner" who offered to keep the weapon locked in a gun safe.

The only problem?

As of May 11, 2015 in the State of Oregon, any transfer of a firearm, even between private parties when no money changes hands, requires a full background check.
 link to www.oregonlive.com

Lake Oswego pastor could face charges for transfer of AR-15

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A reverend from Lake Oswego who won an AR-15 in a raffle with plans to destroy it could face misdemeanor charges for transferring the weapon illegally because he didn't perform a background check before he gave it to one of his parishioners to hold for safe keeping. (Joe Raedle/Getty Images)
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Jeremy Lucas, the Lake Oswego reverend who made national news last week when he announced that he would destroy an AR-15 he won in a raffle, may have run afoul of the law when he gave the gun to a parishioner for safe keeping without performing a background check.

Whether or not Lucas will be prosecuted remains to be seen, according to a spokesman for the Oregon State Police, who are looking into the case.

It started about two weeks ago when Lucas was perusing social media and happened upon a Willamette Week story on a girls softball league that was holding a raffle to sponsor the team's travel to a tournament in California. The grand prize: an AR-15.

Lucas told the Oregonian/OregonLive that he was "disturbed" by the thought of a kids' sports league raffling off a rifle, but that he wanted to support the team's fundraising effort so, using $3,000 of discretionary funds from the church, he bought as many raffle tickets as he could in the hopes of winning the rifle, which he did.

The reverend was well aware the thousands he spent on raffle tickets could have purchased multiple similar weapons. He said he not only wanted to get the rifle off the street, but also wanted to make sure he funded the girls' trip.

The brouhaha started when Lucas announced his plans to destroy the rifle. After garnering plenty of local press, the Washington Post picked up the story and Lucas told the paper he had picked up the rifle from a gun store, but had left the rifle at the home of a "responsible gun owner" who offered to keep the weapon locked in a gun safe.

The only problem? As of May 11, 2015, any transfer of a firearm, even between private parties when no money changes hands, requires a full background check.

homepage: homepage: http://www.oregonlive.com/portland/index.ssf/2016/08/lake_oswego_pastor_could_face.html


Lake Oswego pastor could face charges in transfer of AR-15 01.Aug.2016 21:23

Sunday, 31 July 2016 13:43 | Written by Gary M. Stein

Giving weapon to parishioner for safekeeping without a background check violated state law

REVIEW PHOTO: VERN UYETAKE - The Rev. Jeremy Lucas of Christ Church Episcopal Parish in Lake Oswego holds the 150 tickets he purchased in an all-star softball team's raffle. The prize was an AR-15 assault rifle that Lucas says he will destroy, but the pastor's handling of the weapon after taking possession is now being questioned.

It will be up to the Oregon State Police to decide whether to pursue allegations that the Rev. Jeremy Lucas violated state law last week by asking a parishioner to store the AR-15 assault rifle he won in a softball team's raffle.

Lake Oswego Police Chief Don Johnson told The Review on Saturday that after an initial "query," the LOPD has passed complaints about Lucas to the OSP, which is responsible for deciding whether to conduct an investigation into accusations that the Oregon Firearms Safety Act was violated.

"I have discussed the matter with the Oregon State Police and am coordinating follow-up with that agency," Johnson said, adding that "neither the Lake Oswego Police Department nor the Oregon State Police can comment on ongoing queries of this nature."

The allegations came to light on Friday after Lucas, who passed a background check at a local gun shop before taking possession of the AR-15, told the Washington Post that he and his wife then "drove it to the home of a parishioner, a 'responsible gun owner,' Lucas said, who offered to keep the rifle locked up in a gun safe until the pastor is ready to destroy it."

For that transfer of possession to be legal under Oregon law, the Christ Church Episcopal parishioner should have undergone a background check at a licensed gun dealer while Lucas was present. If that did not happen, Lucas may have committed a Class A misdemeanor, which is punishable by a fine of up to $6,250 and as much as a year in jail.

Johnson said it was up to the Oregon State Police to decide whether to conduct its own investigation or defer to another agency. On Monday, OSP spokesman Capt. Bill Fugate said the investigation was still in its early stages, and the Clackamas County District Attorney's Office said it won't decide whether to pursue criminal charges until it receives the results of an OSP investigation.

Several troopers at the OSP investigate weapons transfers, but neither Fugate nor Johnson indicated how long a state investigation would take.

Lucas spent $3,000 from a church discretionary fund and member donations to buy 150 raffle tickets in the District 2 Big League Softball Team raffle. At the time, he said he had two goals: to help the girls team get to a California tournament and to take the weapon out of circulation.

Lucas won, and he told The Review last week that he plans to transform the assault rifle into a piece or pieces of art.

"It's a small, symbolic act," he said. "There are millions of guns, I know that. But this gun will never be used to kill kids in schools, kill people in a movie theater, kill people at an office party or at any other place of mass shootings. This gun will never be found by a child who accidently shoots a friend. ... It will never be stolen and used to commit a crime or used to threaten a family in a domestic violence situation.

"If I had the chance for $3,000 to keep any of these things from happening even one time I'd do it again in a second," he said.

On Monday, he said he was surprised to learn of the investigation.

"I will cooperate with any investigation that the Oregon State Police wants to have," he told The Review. "Anything that furthers the conversation about our gun laws in the state of Oregon, I'm happy that that would happen."


How On Earth Is All This Relevant To Us? n/t 01.Aug.2016 23:10

blues

???

blues, is "us" ? 02.Aug.2016 08:33

??

( "simple score voting", is 'us' ? etc. ... )

Just Like FaceBook 02.Aug.2016 12:24

Not Blues

Another corporate news story being re-posted