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Pheasants Liberated From Oregon Game Bird Farm

Pheasants Liberated From Oregon Game Bird Farm
"On the morning of May 20th, a visit was paid to Gervais Game Bird Farm (6565 St Louis Rd NE, Gervais, Oregon). This farm breeds 'game birds' both for slaughter and to be sold to canned hunting operations. A flight pen located at the edge of the property had its gate pried open, giving dozens of captive ringneck pheasants a chance to fly off into the countryside. Do to logistical concerns the remaining pens and enclosures on the farm which imprisoned quail and partridge were unable to be breached. Tonight, direct action was able to give a few animals a chance
at freedom, but there is no solace in the knowledge that some were left behind.

Ringneck pheasants are a naturalized species to the Willamette Valley and those bred on farms retain the natural instincts necessary for survival in
the wild.

In solidarity with animal liberation prisoner Kevin Olliff and the silent ones on the run.

For anarchy and animal liberation.

-A.L.F."

 http://directaction.info/news_may21_14.htm

 http://supportkevinandtyler.com/

 http://saynothing.noblogs.org/

congrats! 21.May.2014 12:49

9l

Half of them will be dead in two weeks.

Unless they have been taught to scratch for their food, they will slowly starve to death if they aren't eaten by every coyote, feral cat, raccoon, fox, etc in the area. Ask anybody who has raised them in quantity (not free range). caged birds are stupid. They don't know to run away from danger, they don't know where or how to find food or water unless its handed to them.
Predation, Starvation.

The other half will be re-captured because the farmer will just keep food and water out in the pen and they will wonder back to it. Why? because they are stupid animals.

Thanks 21.May.2014 14:15

birds eye

Yeh, idiots can claim they will be "dead in a week," but we know. In truth, they would have all died. But now they have a chance. Thanks!

Captive bred pheasants can survive in the wild 21.May.2014 14:29

alf supporter

"Half of them will be dead in two weeks."

100% of them will be dead if they remain on the farm. They will either be slaughtered for their flesh or killed during a controlled canned hunt. Even if half of them die from predators, they still have a higher chance of survival then they would have had they not been released.

"Unless they have been taught to scratch for their food, they will slowly starve to death if they aren't eaten by every coyote, feral cat, raccoon, fox, etc in the area. Ask anybody who has raised them in quantity (not free range). caged birds are stupid. They don't know to run away from danger, they don't know where or how to find food or water unless its handed to them."

Do you know that the wild ring-necked pheasant population in this state are all descendants of farmed raised birds? The original population of ring-necked pheasant were farm raised and introduced by sport hunters starting in the late 1800's. It's simply false to assert that these birds have no chance at survival in the wild, because all the evidence points to the opposite. As the above communique state: these birds are bred to maintain their wild instincts. This is commonly done because it more desirable for hunters to hunt birds that "give chase" as opposed to some domesticated animal that just stands around (pretty morbid, right?). So, yeah, you have no idea what you are talking about.

Cheers, to who ever did this action. Reading this really made my day.

reality 26.Feb.2017 18:55

fearnotruth

those raised for poultry markets live more freely in captivity than most chickens - why not hit a chicken factory farm ? way more birds - game birds used in bird dog training and hunting are either blanked (starter pistol shot for training the dog as bird flies off) or shot on the field, if the trial includes retrieval, or on a hunting field, if released for hunting - the call for that arises from loss of natural habitat - wild game birds are rarer by the year - lots of missed shots as well - many make it to the wild, where hawks and other predators usually get them - some may establish coveys and klatches if they get free in the right habitat - most released from farm pens in actions like this die shortly - many on nearby highways, literally within hours or days - if you really want to set pen-raised game birds "free" - buy them, take them to a suitable habitat and release them there, but check with Oregon Dept. of Fish and Wildlife first - there are pertinent regulations - btw: fish ponds right down the road from this farm, why not go net fish and take them to a nearby river?