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Portland Is First U.S. City to Divest Funds from Walmart

On Thursday, May 15, the city of Portland got rid of $9 million, or 25 percent, of its investments in Walmart. This marks the beginning of a divestment program that will purge Portland's investment portfolio of $36 million in Walmart bonds by 2016, according to a press release. The divestment plan is part of the city's responsible investment initiative, introduced by City Commissioner Steve Novick, and adopted in October 2013. The initiative also prohibits the city from purchasing Walmart bonds in the future.
 link to www.yesmagazine.org

Portland Is First U.S. City to Divest Funds from Walmart

The initiative also prohibits the city from purchasing Walmart bonds in the future.

by Laura Garcia, Molly Rusk
posted May 16, 2014

On Thursday, May 15, the city of Portland got rid of $9 million, or 25 percent, of its investments in Walmart. This marks the beginning of a divestment program that will purge Portland's investment portfolio of $36 million in Walmart bonds by 2016, according to a press release. The divestment plan is part of the city's responsible investment initiative, introduced by City Commissioner Steve Novick, and adopted in October 2013. The initiative also prohibits the city from purchasing Walmart bonds in the future.

Portland is not only discontinuing its investments in Walmart, but has set up a committee to advise it on making socially responsible investments in the future. The committee will address issues like abusive labor practices, corruption, and health concerns, among other things.

During a press conference on May 15, Commissioner Novick encouraged other cities to adopt similar initiatives.

From what I can tell, no other U.S. city has looked at socially responsible investing in quite the same way as Portland. I'm hopeful other cities and states take note and adopt similar investment principles to hold companies accountable and align our investment policies with our values.

Meanwhile, the company's net income fell 5 percent, and shares fell 2 percent, in the first quarter of 2014, failing to meet Wall Street's expectations for the third time in five quarters.

Walmart blamed its poor performance on bad weather.

homepage: homepage: http://www.yesmagazine.org/new-economy/portland-is-first-city-to-divest-funds-from-walmart
address: address: YES! Magazine


good. 20.May.2014 06:11

9i

Good, but for a different reason. Walmart's stock price has stayed stagnate for over a year, and the forecast for retail stocks sucks. Which is probably the real reason they dumped it.
Walmart does nothing that K-Mart, Target, Best Buy, etc. doesn't do it just happens to be the biggest so therefore its a target.

municipalities have to invest in the market in order to fund their employees pensions. Something that many are finding out weren't funded very well. Illinois is 100 billion in the red on pensions. That's about $20K for every man, woman and child in Illinois. You can't be a good communist unless you are a good capitalist first.

Maybe... 20.May.2014 10:48

let them go

What they haven't done is invest in themselves. Illinois may be a poster child for corruption in government whatever political stripe one wears. Walmart has become a symbol of nation-wide corruption and manipulation of local public interest. Is it about communism or capitalism or that what we've done is manipulated the circulation of wealth to some never-neverland and Walmart's local reinvestment is minimal and second-hand at best? I don't have a problem with private capital, but seems in this current culture 'capital' of this nature has little meaning at the level at which their customers reside.

Let me say this about that... 29.Dec.2014 23:00

Loci puckster03@lycos.com

How about the city make micro loans to local people who want to start up small businesses in impoverished parts of town. Fesk corporations.


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When you're looking into developing an existing business or starting a new one, it's important to put "raising capital" at the top of your to-do list. There are a variety of funding options you can pursue to get your venture off the ground.

Small Business Administration Loan

The Small Business Administration (SBA) is a U.S. government agency that specializes in both short- and long-term loan programs. The majority of borrowers use what is known as the 7(a) program. There are a few 7(a) loan requirements to be aware of:
•The business must be operating for profit and demonstrate the need based on invested equity.
•A sound business plan should be in place and show reasonable effort to seek out alternative forms of financial capital.
•The borrower should not be in delinquency or default on any government debt, such as student loans or government-backed mortgages.

The SBA microloan program has similar requirements and includes a vested interest from additional individual lending and credit requirements. The loans are available in amounts up to $50,000 and may require some collateral.

SBA loans can offer a large amount of borrowing-power leverage and offer longer payment terms if needed. The cons to these loans include fees that can be somewhat high and the fact that the underwriting process may require personal assets, such as real estate or a car, as backup in case the loan defaults.

Equity Loans and Lines of Credit

These loans can function as a mix of secured and unsecured debt financing. They are usually used as a reserve of capital to tap into. The borrower is not given a check from a lender. Instead, the business owner is allowed to write against a specific line of credit from real estate or a line of credit based on credit history. Caution should be taken to protect assets and reduce the effects of compounded interest.

Peer-to-Peer Lending

Peer-to-peer, or P2P, lending is a very popular solution for a small business trying to start up. You may find yourself with a solid business plan. However, a few bad financial blemishes in the past or a lack of resources may make it difficult to receive traditional loans. This is where peer-to-peer lending comes into play. These personal loans link up the business plan with individual investors at various interest rates. Most lending networks require a successful plan and a credit background.

These lending networks are usually more lenient on credit scores and allow for predictable fixed rates. The downside to these loans is the extra work required to create and deliver an exceptional business plan.

Working Capital Loans

Working capital loans are similar to a revolving line of credit in that most forms require some collateral. These loans are a quick exchange of business assets into the form of a loan. If you are just starting out, these can be opportunities to develop working capital very quickly. Be sure to keep all your assets in check to avoid losing them in a default.