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A Global Ban on Left-Wing Politics

That's what the new rules being smuggled into trade agreements are delivering. The Guardian journalist, George Monbiot, refers to Philip Morris, Pacific Rim Gold Mining (Canada) and other corporations that may be enriched by the "Investor-state dispute settlement" provisions in the TTIP and TAFTA.
to read George Monbiot's article "A Global Ban on Left-Wing Politics" published on November 4, 2013 in the Guardian, click on

 http://www.monbiot.com/2013/11/04/a-global-ban-on-left-wing-politics/

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The Global Economy: Battle lost; austerity won 06.Dec.2013 17:24

Antonio Fatas

to read Antonio Fatas' blog on the global economy published on December 5, 2013, click on

 http://fatasmihov.blogspot.de/2013/12/battle-lost-austerity-won.html

Battle lost: austerity won.
It has been surprising to see how over the last five years some have been holding to their economic theories even if the facts kept proving them wrong (Yyperinflation? Confidence and austerity?). At the end, it seems that ideology dominates much of the macroeconomic analysis we see these days. But what is more surprising is how broad this phenomenon is and how the general economic commentary that one reads in the press cannot move away from those theories either.

One statement that will not go away is the constant reference to "printing money" which is not only incorrect from a factual point of view (most of the increase in the monetary base corresponds to reserves not to bank notes being printed) but also misleading when it comes to the understanding of the role of central banks. Even those who support central bank actions during the crisis have to add a sentence at the end to warn us about the danger of so much liquidity.

And austerity, as much as the data has disproven the claim that it would be through reduction in government spending and increased confidence that advanced economies will return to healthy growth rates, it does not seem to lose its appeal either.