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Mickey Mouse Must Die!

Mickey Mouse has been quietly eating away at the entire economy of the United States. It sounds highly peculiar indeed, but it's all true. Here is the real inside story.
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The Washington Post [.com] — October 25, 2013 — 15 years ago, Congress kept Mickey Mouse out of the public domain. Will they do it again?
 link to www.washingtonpost.com

For most of history, a great character or story or song has passed from its original creator into the public domain. Shakespeare and Charles Dickens and Beethoven are long dead, but Macbeth and Oliver Twist and the Fifth Symphony are part of our shared cultural heritage, free to be used or re-invented by anyone on the planet who is so inclined. But 15 years ago this Sunday, President Clinton signed the Sonny Bono Copyright Term Extension Act, which retroactively extended copyright protection. As a result, the great creative output of the 20th century, from Superman to "Gone With the Wind" to Gershwin's "Rhapsody in Blue," were locked down for an extra 20 years.
Without the 1998 Copyright Term Extension Act, the book Gone with the Wind would have fallen into the public domain at the end of 2011, and the film would fall into the public domain at the end of 2014.

Without the 1998 Copyright Term Extension Act, the book Gone with the Wind would have fallen into the public domain at the end of 2011, and the film would fall into the public domain at the end of 2014. (MGM)

It was a windfall to the families and corporations that owned these lucrative copyrights. But it meant these iconic works would be off-limits to those who wanted to reuse or reinvent them without permission. And hundreds of thousands of lesser-known works aren't available at all, because there's no cost-effective way to obtain permission to republish them.

The copyright extension Clinton signed will expire in five years. Copyright holders like the Disney Corp. and the Gershwin estate have a strong incentive to try to extend copyright extension yet further into the future. But with the emergence of the Internet as a political organizing tool, opponents of copyright extension will be much better prepared. The question for the coming legislative battle on copyright is who will prevail: those who would profit from continuing to lock up the great works of the 20th century, or those who believe Bugs Bunny should be as freely available for reuse as Little Red Riding Hood.
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The little fascist Mickey Mouse has precisely represented all that is wrong and stupid in so-called modern living. A little monster eating away at our souls.

Time to let the "copyright" to this little fascist monster die. Stomp on its image in the streets. Burn its fascist little effigy at the end of poles.

Let it die!