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What's going on with the world's fish and dolphins?

Something needs to be done! Our planet is being poisoned.
 link to www.trueactivist.com

Dr. Masaru Emoto has conducted scientific experiments demonstrating the physical effect of human intentions on water. There is a visible difference between blessed water and water that has not been blessed. Check out this video to see how he conducted a blessing on Lake Pontchartrain:  http://jpaulson.blogspot.com/2013/08/dr-masaru-emoto-water-blessing-at-lake.html

Canary in a coal mine? Worse than that, I suspect. This is an emergency. Let's focus our attention towards healing the planet.

homepage: homepage: http://jpaulson.blogspot.com


U.S. Navy to Increase Sonar Training and Underwater Detonations 21.Aug.2013 09:53

repost

U.S. Navy to Increase Sonar Training and Underwater Detonations Despite Injury to Marine Mammals


The U.S. Navy has indicated that it intends to disregard the California Coastal Commission's (CCC) recommendations to mitigate the harmful effects of Navy sonar and offshore training exercises on the state's marine mammals. In a letter dated July 31, the Navy responded to the CCC's March objection, which concluded that the Navy's planned training and testing activities in Southern California would not be consistent with California coastal law.

The Navy's plans would allow a radical increase in sonar training and underwater detonations off Southern California, beginning in January 2014. While the Navy says it is open to negotiation, it refuses in its letter to abide by any of the state's recommended mitigation measures, such as avoiding training in globally important foraging habitat for the endangered blue whale.

The Navy's review comes in the wake of several new studies showing that its Southern California activities are harming marine mammal species, such as blue whales and beaked whales, far more than was previously known.

"The Navy's plan to dramatically increase its sonar training and underwater detonations off the Southern California coast shouldn't come at the expense of the state's marine life," said Michael Jasny, Natural Resources Defense Council's marine mammal project director. "Its proposal blatantly disregards new science showing that current training levels could already be devastating California's beaked whale populations and preventing endangered blue whales from recovering from near-extinction."

"The Coastal Commission has offered reasonable measures that take into account the Navy's need for flexibility while affording greater protection to vulnerable species," Jasny continues. "The Navy's refusal to adopt any of these measures puts California's marine life in jeopardy."

Beginning next January, the Navy plans to dramatically increase sonar training and underwater detonations off of Southern California over the next five years. The Navy estimates that it would kill 130 marine mammals outright, permanently deafen another 1,600, and significantly disrupt feeding, calving and other vital behaviors more than 8.8 million times in the process. Compared with its previous exercises in the region, these numbers represent a 1,300 percent increase.

Each year, the Navy would run more than 10,000 hours of the same high-intensity military sonar that has killed and injured whales around the globe. In addition, the Navy would detonate more than 50,000 underwater explosives off the Southern California coast. Hundreds of these explosives would pack enough charge to sink a warship, which is exactly what they're used for.

For some species, like the magnificent gray whales that migrate up and down our coast, the incidence of harm is several times the size of their entire populations. The most vulnerable marine mammals are the beaked whales, a family of species that are considered acutely sensitive to Navy sonar, with documented injury and death. A government study published earlier this year found that beaked whale populations have indeed declined substantially in the California current over the past 20 years, and suggests that the Navy's range may have become a population sink, making it difficult for them to breed or bring their calves to maturity.

Another Southern California study found that the Navy's frequent sonar training poses significant risks to the recovery of endangered blue whales, whose numbers have not rebounded in the Pacific since commercial whaling was banned more than 25 years ago.




 link to earthfirstnews.wordpress.com

Salmon News 21.Aug.2013 10:38

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Sockeye salmon at dire historic low on Canada's Pacific coast "We think something happened in the ocean" "The elders have never seen anything like this at all" Alaska and Russia also affected

Aboriginal people in British Columbia who rely on Skeena River sockeye are facing some extremely difficult decisions as sockeye salmon returns plunge to historic lows. Lake Babine Chief Wilf Adam was on his way to Smithers, B.C., on Monday for a discussion about whether to entirely shut down the food fishery on Lake Babine, something he said would be drastic and unprecedented.

Mel Kotyk, North Coast area director for the Department of Fisheries and Oceans said department scientists don't know why the return numbers are so low. "[...] we think something happened in the ocean."

"We've never seen anything like this in all these years I've done this. I've asked the elders and they have never seen anything like this at all." said Chief Wilf Adam


These stories were posted up on enenews. This suggests a possible explanation is radiation from Fukushima. That is speculation at this point. It could also be climate change related.

In 2011, Arnie Gundersen, nuclear expert from Fairewinds said this: "So eventually though we are going to see top of the food chain animals like tuna and salmon and things like that that have this process bio accumulates. The bigger fish gradually get higher and higher concentrations. And I am concerned that the FDA is not monitoring fish entering the United States because sooner or later a tuna is going to set off a radiation alarm at some part and people are going to think it's a dirty bomb or something like that. So that's not here yet because the tuna haven't migrated across the Pacific. But I am thinking by 2013 we might see contamination of the water and of the top of the food chain fishes on the West Coast."

!n July 2012 Gundersen said this: "The federal and even state agencies are not measuring this... I've been working on the West Coast and I've been trying to get the people of Oregon to demand of their state, the people of Alaska to demand of their state: Check the salmon, it is not difficult, it's on the order of $500 a fish. Of course you don't have to test every fish, but let's test a couple and see. Either alleviate the fear or announce that yes indeed they are radioactive."

It's the water... 22.Aug.2013 07:33

Shaker

A great site, the Institute of Science in Society, presents referenced articles and papers on a variety of subjects, including water as a creative source. Most papers are summarized, also with references, and are accessibly readable to even a non-scientist like me. Here are just two of their offerings on water.

 http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Life_is_Water_Electric.php

 http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Life_is_Water_Electric_(part_2).php

Much more at  http://www.i-sis.org.uk/index.php