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Fukushima Update: 'The Radioactive Discharge is Out of Control'

Japan's nuclear watchdog said on Monday that radioactive water is seeping into the ocean creating an emergency Tepco is struggling to contain. The contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier and is rising towards the surface, says the nuclear regulator.
Masashi Goto, a retired nuclear engineer who worked on several Tepco plants [...] says the current situation is more than Tepco can handle. Tepco now admits that tainted water is reaching the sea, saying on Friday the radioactive discharge is out of control.

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BBC: Flow of radioactive water into Pacific could 'accelerate rapidly' now that barrier is breached at Fukushima plant Tepco clearly in 'deep trouble'

BBC News, August 5, 2013: A barrier built to contain the water has already been breached, the Nuclear Regulatory Authority warned. This means the amount of contaminated water seeping into the Pacific Ocean could accelerate rapidly, it said. [...] It has been clear for months now that the operators of the Fukushima plant are in deep trouble, says the BBC's Rupert Wingfield-Hayes.

Radio New Zealand, August 5, 2013: The Nuclear Regulatory Authority said on Monday that a barrier built to contain the water has already been breached. It said this means the amount of contaminated water seeping into the Pacific Ocean could accelerate rapidly.

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Highly radioactive water [is] seeping into the ocean from Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant [...]

This contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier [...] Shinji Kinjo, head of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) task force, told Reuters. [...]

"Right now, we have an emergency," he said.

Tepco deeply apologized to residents in Fukushima prefecture, the surrounding region and the larger public for causing inconveniences, worries and trouble. [...]

[Kinjo] acknowledged that if the water reaches the surface, "it would flow extremely fast."


Excerpts from  http://enenews.com/category/location/japan

a bit more 05.Aug.2013 20:41

detail

Tepco is struggling to contain the highly radioactive water that is seeping into the ocean near Fukushima. The head of Japan's NRA, Shinji Kinjo exclaimed, "right now, we have an emergency," as he noted the contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier and is rising toward the surface - exceeding the limits of radioactive discharge. In a rather outspoken comment for the typically stoic Japanese, Kinjo said Tepco's "sense of crisis was weak," adding that "this is why you can't just leave it up to Tepco alone" to grapple with the ongoing disaster. As Reuters notes, Tepco has been accused of covering up shortcomings and has been lambasted for its ineptness in the response and while the company says it is taking actions to contain the leaks, Kinjo fears if the water reaches the surface "it would flow extremely fast," with some suggesting as little as three weeks until this critical point.



 link to www.zerohedge.com

Highly radioactive water seeping into the ocean from Japan's crippled Fukushima nuclear plant is creating an "emergency" that the operator is struggling to contain, an official from the country's nuclear watchdog said on Monday.

This contaminated groundwater has breached an underground barrier, is rising toward the surface and is exceeding legal limits of radioactive discharge, Shinji Kinjo, head of a Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) task force, told Reuters.
Countermeasures planned by Tokyo Electric Power Co are only a temporary solution, he said.
Tepco's "sense of crisis is weak," Kinjo said. "This is why you can't just leave it up to Tepco alone" to grapple with the ongoing disaster.
"Right now, we have an emergency," he said.

...

If you build a wall, of course the water is going to accumulate there. And there is no other way for the water to go but up or sideways and eventually lead to the ocean," said Masashi Goto, a retired Toshiba Corp nuclear engineer who worked on several Tepco plants. "So now, the question is how long do we have?"

Contaminated water could rise to the ground's surface within three weeks, the Asahi Shimbun said on Saturday. Kinjo said the three-week timeline was not based on NRA's calculations but acknowledged that if the water reaches the surface, "it would flow extremely fast."

more 06.Aug.2013 11:14

Shaker

Good historic overview and up-to-date news here that's concise:

 http://www.simplyinfo.org/

And though I personally term these 'incidents' rather than 'accidents' for no other reason that they're statistically supported (incident per reactor hour) here's one list of greater nuclear incidents:

 http://nukeprofessional.blogspot.com/p/nuke-accidents-civilian-and-military-99.html

On an editorial note, consciousness of perception continues to amaze. Most disturbing seems the idea that particular and discrete knowledge is necessary to understand technology, while I ask if one really has to have discrete knowledge of the environment of space beyond the atmosphere and mechanics of space travel to understand that it's a dangerous proposition at best. With this analogy I'm hardly proposing that an effort shouldn't be made, just that proper attention be given to the dangers, particularly to the dangers that human complexity brings to an already complex problem. To take the analogy further, one could point to the rigorous training required of one who is anything but along for the ride in all aspects of space travel, from imagining, engineering, and manufacture of the vehicle to basic physical and mental fitness to perform the act. The intention of that training and by extension its intense scrutiny for any real or perceived mode of failure is not to weed out the unwilling or even those who might not have an understanding of the mechanics, but to eliminate fools as well and the ignorant (as in ignore) and forward the project as best as one can. One could think that technology in time is self-limiting in that respect, as humans with the hope of returning from Mars to this point in time have found. But with nuclear power it doesn't seem there's a perception that to even entertain statistics and limits that propose failure is to admit to failure's presence. Somehow there's the idea of being informed and those statistics are reason for optimism, not wariness. (I might propose that optimistic perception is the intented result of those with anything but the general progress of humaity in mind for publishing a statistical model at all.) Responsibility defaults to the fools, the ignorant, and heroes who might not even wish to be reaching for money and/or glory. It's not working out well, is it?

This incident and the reaction to it impresses me more as being like trusting my old Ford with any more than slight chance to make it across the country in any other form but scrap on its way to be recycled if I wash it every day and it looks good. I'll tell you right now that I wouldn't entertain the thought. Even if desperate, but with other alternative, would you try it either if I told you that if it breaks you can't leave it where it's quit and it's going to have to be pushed the rest of the way by brute, strictly human, force? You'd think it's foolish to try and look around for something else, right? Would arriving there prove that it wasn't a foolish undertaking and not just plain damned luck?

With nuclear, we've left on such a trip and have hardly arrived. Fukushima, this particular old Ford, is a failure of grand proportions that all point not only to the obvious such as siting of the reactors themselves to lack of respect for historic and statistical models, but also to a general lack of will to form perceptions that have respect for failure and those failure's outcomes. Seems it broke somewhere on a uphill grade and it's rolling back down the hill, away from the destination, and there seems to be only room in back for a few pushers due to (unfathomable) foolish reasons.

I might personally believe that fools have dominated the application of nuclear technology in general, and ask it be noted that I draw a distinct line between science and the mechanics that make use of science. While the perception may be correct that the two aren't mutually exclusive, it's wrong to think that either can't exist alone. Mechanics may be the weaker sibling or the stillborn child in the family. Did one had to actually build a nuclear weapon to have some idea of the implications? There is documented fact that some did have that idea but, as usual, fools and their majority dominated perceptions of the ignorant (again, as in 'ignore) and it's been a trip that hasn't been very merry with the acute problems long ago recognized. (One only has to think of the reasons behind that horrible compromise of the early sixties nuclear test ban treat for evidence. It surely wasn't because of fear of bomb blasts and their fallout in war, but that with the above-ground testing the fall-out, if continued, was going to be debilitating just the same.) I don't believe humanity in general is stupid (as in senseless or dulled) as some may disdainfully and cynically propose. Stupidity is a chosen form of existence for most, but foolishness and a respect for time's effects are general. Most believe in luck, but it's only the foolish and those who assume desperation that depend upon it.

Well, it seems, even the fools now are apologizing, maybe without general implications, but the extension should be made rather than point out differences in mechanics as proof that the apology need only be applied to this particular incident. Nuclear power is still generally foolish, still has the human complexities that muddle the situation beyond mechanical proof. Personally I can't get any comfort from the fact that this incident is indiscriminate as to wealth, race, creed, or intelligence as some do. All I know is that it's going to be lived with whatever the overall outcome in time. It almost makes one wish that petty wars, tyrannical oppression, famine, or natural catastrophe were all that needed to be considered in our existence.

... 06.Aug.2013 20:15

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Why not desalinate the contaminated water? 24.May.2014 02:04

Clint clintl@hotmail.cm

Why has no desalination plant been built to remove the radio active salts from the contaminated water? The desalinated water would contain no radio active materials. It is amazing that this solution has yet to be implemented.