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9.11 investigation | human & civil rights

NYPD Builds $40 Million Fortress Around World Trade Center

The Department's post-construction proposal would limit traffic over a 16-acre swath of the Financial District and includes guardhouses, bollards and entry-exit checkpoints, documents show.

Police will man security booths. Road barriers will go up, similar to those near the New York Stock Exchange and concrete bollards will be everywhere.

"It will not be a fortress like environment. It will be a very open environment," NYPD Deputy Commissioner Richard Daddario said.
 link to newyork.cbslocal.com

NYPD Set To Spend $40 Million On Intense Security At World Trade Center

Critics Sound Off On Idea Of Security Booths, Concrete Bollards, Road Barriers

May 17, 2013 6:40 PM

NEW YORK (CBSNewYork) - Security over style that's the argument NYPD officials are making as they plan to install barricades and barriers in the area surrounding One World Trade Center.

What's being lost, critics said, is a chance to restore a vibrant streetscape. They said the mistakes made 50 years ago that left the Twin Towers isolated from the city's streets are being repeated.

The NYPD and other officials say security concerns must be addressed and their plan will make these streets more pedestrian and bike friendly. The Department's post-construction security plan, which will cost an estimated $40 million, calls for multiple streets closed to most through traffic, just four entry checkpoints and five exit points over the entire 16-acre site.

Police will man security booths. Road barriers will go up, similar to those near the New York Stock Exchange and concrete bollards will be everywhere.

"The reason for that is we want to keep a car bomb off the site," NYPD Deputy Commissioner Richard Daddario said.

Daddario laid out the plans for CBS 2′s Derricke Dennis, calling them necessary, safer, and, most importantly, pedestrian friendly.

"It will not be a fortress like environment. It will be a very open environment," Daddario said.

But that's exactly what many who live and own businesses around the World Trade Center said they fear a frozen security fortress, turning tourists, residents, and money away, in the face of barricades and roadblocks.

The idea of 11-foot-high guard posts and pop-up barricades of the type you see around the stock exchange and One Police Plaza generated some anger in the neighborhood.

"It's ugly and we understand it will not look like that here," Cathy Hughes said.

Hughes chairs the area community board and said though the plans have not been finalized, she's been promised an open World Trade Center feel.

"We are all looking forward to the security fences going down, being able to walk again around the World Trade Center site," Hughes said.

With two kids, "Aliza" said she is willing to go along.

"I'm okay with it, different than all for it, I'm okay with it. I support it. If there's a reason for it, I don't think they'd do it if there wasn't a reason," she told WCBS 880 reporter Paul Murnane.
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"Sarah" said she'd wait and see.

"I do trust them that they'll take all the measures that are necessary and if they really feel that is what we need to do, then I think that's fine," she said. "We'll just have to suck it up."

Many others welcomed the security.

"I think it should be more secure. Coming from Oklahoma City, I think it should be more security," tourist Cathy Wedman said.

"We're gonna have to walk for freedom, but we need the security," added Yvette Pinto of East New York.

Greenwich and Fulton Streets would again crisscross the World Trade Center site, but the plan is to close those streets to everyday traffic.




 link to www.nypost.com

Furor over NYPD's planned Fort WTC

By BILL SANDERSON
Last Updated: 12:16 PM, May 17, 2013
Posted: 1:04 AM, May 17, 2013

The NYPD plans to build a fortress around the World Trade Center site once it's completed and the measures have downtown residents up in arms.

The $40 million police proposal would limit traffic over a 16-acre swath of the Financial District and includes guardhouses, bollards and checkpoints, documents show.

Residents wanted Greenwich Street to be finally fully open to traffic it was cut off by the original Twin Towers but the NYPD rejected that idea in favor of security checkpoints on cars and trucks, documents show.

East-west traffic between West and Church streets also will be cut off by the plan, which puts security barriers on Vesey and Fulton streets and an elaborate "sally port" on Liberty Street so cops can check tour buses.

The plan was laid out in an environmental-impact statement required by city and state laws.

The deadline on comments for the proposal is next Wednesday, and the police and other agencies expect to begin construction of street barriers, security booths, sidewalk bollards and other installations later this year.

The plan also calls for bollards that would run the length of West Street from Vesey to Liberty streets and along Church Street and Trinity Place.

About seven intersections will be limited by a dual-barricade system controlled by police officers in guard stations.

"Each personnel booth would be up to approximately 11 feet tall with a building footprint measuring up to approximately 12 feet by six feet," documents show.

Some downtown activists say the plan goes too far.

The NYPD will "close access to many of the streets that under the original plan for the redevelopment were supposed to be open," said Julie Menin, former chair of Community Board 1.

Menin, a candidate for Manhattan borough president, was among those to oppose an early draft of the plan presented last year to the City Planning Commission.

But other experts in urban planning say the police proposal will help the neighborhood and its businesses by encouraging people to walk or bicycle.

"It's going to be better for pedestrians and it's going to be worse for vehicles. That's a good thing," said Jeff Zupan, of the Regional Plan Association.

"The bad thing is that you have these checkpoints that make it look more like an armed camp or a gated community."