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For Everyone Shocked By What Just Happened....

And Why This Is Just The Beginning

One should really read this, even if not up to speed on the Euro. Didn't like bank bailouts? It's world-wide economy, right?
Today, lots of people woke up in shock and horror to what happened in Cyprus: a forced capital reallocation mandated by political elites under the guise of an "equity investment" in insolvent banks, which is really code for a "coercive, mandatory wealth tax." If less concerned about political correctness, one could say that what just happened was daylight robbery from savers to banks and the status quo. These same people may be even more shocked to learn that today's Cypriot "resolution" is merely the first of many such coercive interventions into personal wealth, first in Europe, and then everywhere else.

 link to www.zerohedge.com

Your link won't open without an account 17.Mar.2013 22:12

The Dude

You linked to a website that requires an account to log in and read anything. This is Indymedia. Please cut and paste the whole article or don't waste our time.

I Had Zero Trouble Opening The Link With No Account 18.Mar.2013 04:10

blues

This is really just "bank robbery in reverse." Actually, a reasonably enforced wealth tax would be vastly more progressive than graduated income taxes. "Tax the rich. Feed the poor. Till there are no rich no more." Our good earth has been the riches' plaything, and they have broken it!

See:

 http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2013/03/422183.shtml?discuss#410545

Trickle Down doesn't work and the rich don't make a healthy economy 18.Mar.2013 09:08

The Duda

@ blues:
For me the website opened, but I couldn't read any of their articles without opening an account, and I don't want to open an account with that website. Their account registration didn't work for me when I tried it anyway. I'd prefer that people just post the article on Indymedia, instead of linking to websites that require an account to read their articles.

BTW, I like your ideas in the comment you linked. I have developed a very similar proposal myself. What I recommend is taxation at 100% for any income over $250K per year, and a limit of perhaps $5 million on any individual's property value. Capitalism would continue, but with many small investors, instead of just a few large investors.

Many people would label what you propose and what I propose "Communism." Personally, I'm not offended by that label. I would far prefer government by the majority over our present government by the few.

I had no trouble either 18.Mar.2013 09:19

Shaker

and no trouble imagining that something like this would happen. It essentially has with the Fed's policy of issuing 80 billion or so in various forms each month, worst of which is 40 billion each month buying up those mortgage backed securities. Where would Goldman, JP Morgan, BOA, and Citi be without it? And how about those pensions...

I'm one of those Dylan referred to when he wrote: "When you ain't got nothing you got nothing to lose", not one of those who somehow lost the load somewhere between the Caymans and NYC.

Seems they're backtracking a bit this morning on the percentages and cut-ff points.

I found and read the article on another website. 18.Mar.2013 16:36

The Dude

I found and read the Zero Hedge Fund article, which has been reposted on another website. I won't say which one, because the Anarchists will chime in that it's a conspiracy website. Those Anarchists go postal about "conspiracy theories," except for the ones that they believe in themselves.

First of all... 18.Mar.2013 18:28

repost

I have no trouble accessing the articles there and never have, or I wouldn't have done that. I also don't allow my browser to accept cookies, and I have it set to prompt my permission to allow activeX and scripts. On that site, I allow no activeX. It doesn't seem to prompt me to use scripts.

I just double click the title of the article and open it in a new window or tab, but just double clicking the article title works for me even without a new window or tab. Sorry if it doesn't for you. It wasn't intentional, and I assumed that paying only gave one the ability to comment. Actually, the comments are even more amusing than they are here, and those guys love to talk.

Thanks. 18.Mar.2013 22:50

The Dude

Thanks for the apology, but it's not needed. I have an older computer, and lately it's become impossible for me to enter some websites. Probably time for me to upgrade to the latest high-speed version.

Why Not Just Use Firefox Browser? 19.Mar.2013 09:06

blues

(If you have Active X, you must be using MS Internet Explorer. Horrors!) Firefox should work for everyone. Get it at:
 http://www.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/fx/#desktop

Then try my great Firefox extensions:
覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧
Application: Firefox 19.0.2

BetterPrivacy
Brief
CS Lite Mod
ColorZilla
Colorlicious
Copy HTML
DownloadHelper
Extension List Dumper
Flashblock
Font Finder
Ghostery
Google/Yandex search link fix
List Open URLs
NoScript
PDF Viewer
RefControl
Remove Cookies for Site
Trueblock Plus
覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧覧

Sometimes you can clear up troubles with a site by going to the site, then clicking on "Remove Cookies for Site", and then reloading. Hope this helps!

I might be a heretic 19.Mar.2013 13:26

reposts

Along time ago I tried Firefox...I haven't looked in a while, but I noticed right away that some of plugins are reporters (sending information somewhere else without notification). One thing that really has never impressed me about open source (and don't get me wrong, I like the concept) is that because of its very nature and how complicated some things have become which can confound or mislead the normal computing public including myself, that open source is open also to mischief because anyone has access and input. I know they have smart people and really do a good job of vetting things like the plugins. But, you know, I had a 90 Toyota that got 40 MPH on a carburated engine, stock, and with power. I'm sorry I had to give away because of circumstances because it's still better than so much that's out there today that I can't work on, troubleshoot, or fix beyond switching out parts. Besides, I remember what Mozilla was. Does anyone notice that there's a Netscape reference in their registry? There wasn't a good version of that after 3...

I don't like MS, have been totally unimpressed with them in most cases since the initiation the Windows OS. The reasons are numerous. Let me just say one more thing...I got tired of messing with things like programming a long time ago. It's just a personal thing, but partly because it detracts from what I consider my real life and its richness of itself without creating some other life set by 0/1, either/or parameters. I got to C+ and decided I'd more important things to do. Despite its inherent bugginess (I think it stems from trying to be everything at once, a compromise at best) MS has put out some decent programs, if one just learns their vulnerabilities and how to configure the program, or in the case of IE, know how to choose an antivirus program and configure that. As to what Dude said, I use an old machine, and an old OS. (Christ, I used 98SE until it became way too impractical, but it was a system that was as transparent and available to user input and configuration well after ME, 2000, and anything but the professional versions of XP) use a really old version of IE, but I'm not using it for entertainment and goddamn wish people would begin publishing transcripts of their crap on YouTube because I'm not into watching a video of 45 minutes when I could read its content in 10, maybe less. I've been using computers since the early DOS verions, still like to be able to configure as much as I can on my personal machine and not hand out access or permissions like candy. I still do maintenance on files (my hard drive's no where near even a quarter full), and have a version of Linux for years that I haven't installed years just because of the personal decision I mentioned above about life in relation to these machines.

I've got nothing against Firefox. Probably the majority of people I know use it. I've worked on and fixed other's machines who use it. I guess I'm just getting old, and actually I'm thankful that it's there because an alternative from Google or someone who even remotely resembles them might actually make me dump my machine and rely upon the library if I need one. Once this version of IE that I use becomes impractical it's likely what I'll go to because I have tried others like Opera and while they're OK, it wasn't worth doing anything different than what I do now. I know what I have, I know how it acts, it suits my purpose and use. Enough said, I guess.

I have to admit, though I won't bother to look into it, why anyone had trouble accessing that site. Got a clue and want to inform a lazyass like me? I'd appreciate it.

Well... 19.Mar.2013 13:31

repost

I guess I had the time to type all that shit...

what the 19.Mar.2013 17:39

Clyde

In one post, you just claimed open source is more prone to people adding detrimental content or causing mischief, and then claim that Win98SE "was a system that was as transparent and available to user input and configuration".

You are either a blood relative of Bill Gates, or you have wildly inaccurate information about the open source community. You seriously trust a closed source, proprietary system more than an open-source one? You place more trust in a single company that only cares about profit, over a collective and transparent computing effort, one that also places a big emphasis on security and flexibility? Not to mention the fact that linux can add plenty of life to an old system such as yours.

I mean, if you just prefer IE or Windows, that's fine. I use it a lot when I have to, but your reasoning is just.....so weird.

Probably, Clyde 19.Mar.2013 23:48

repost

But I didn't say 'more prone'. I do like the concept of open source, and use open source programs. But my idea is like this, that if the program coede is open and transparent to everyone, than it's available to all, and like all systems (most, really) that mimic the society we've created, there are some of those all who will take advantage of that availability for mischief. Look at my idea like pickpockets in a crowd. While the crowd is there to protest war, that minority, the pickpockets, (who in reality might really care about the war and whether it happens or not) have other intentions besides. I don't feel it's such unususal thinking myself. Or, it's like the Republicans say (but I don't believe they mean it) that they want to help the needy with social welfare programs, but it's taken advantage of by too many, and has been a waste. While 98SE after all was a Windows OS, there were things that you could change, parameters you could set, that weren't available through menu in later OS. If one would just look at the changes that MS has made on the the menu of the System Information page, one can see what I mean. I'm not saying Windows is better, or that open source is bad at all. As for Linux, I just got to be too much of a lazyass and occupied with other things to do anything with it beyond know something about it enough to get a copy of the OS and then let it lie for years. I do agree that, beyond trying to do something different with what he has and using what I have as an example compared to his, Linux would really extend the life of an older machine. Eliminate all that crap that MS runs all the time and threads through every goddamned little thing. There are ways of turning a lot of that off and still retaining a functional system.

By the way, I haven't paid for an OS since DOS 5.0, then wished I hadn't, and have remained true to the lesson learned.

This has gotten off topic. I hope it's done someone some good.

Back on topic 20.Mar.2013 00:14

repost

This situation's getting pretty interesting. I guess the finance minister of Cyprus is traveling to Moscow now with some sort of deal, something that still includes a haircut on the Russian's money to help bail them out, but also an offer of a deepwater port, some portion of control over their banks, and a percentage of the recently found natural gas there or a portion of the stake in the national corporation that will exploit that gas, or some manner that includes some or all of the above. I wouldn't want to be the finance minister and I wonder if he just has a one-way ticket. It's getting fun until this kind of thing spreads to the PIGS (Portugal, Italy, Greece, and Spain).

what a bunch of idiots 20.Mar.2013 16:53

........

and i don't believe for a second "The Dude" is doing anything but damage control for his conspiratard op friend who fucked up.

"I found and read the Zero Hedge Fund article, which has been reposted on another website. I won't say which one, because the Anarchists will chime in that it's a conspiracy website."

so why the hell are you wasting everyone's time instead of copy pasta for great justice?
[imgs missing]
**************************************************

For Everyone Shocked By What Just Happened... And Why This Is Just The Beginning
Tyler Durden's picture
Submitted by Tyler Durden on 03/16/2013 18:28 -0400

France
Germany
Greece
Insurance Companies
Ireland
Netherlands
Portugal
Real estate
Reality



Today, lots of people woke up in shock and horror to what happened in Cyprus: a forced capital reallocation mandated by political elites under the guise of an "equity investment" in insolvent banks, which is really code for a "coercive, mandatory wealth tax." If less concerned about political correctness, one could say that what just happened was daylight robbery from savers to banks and the status quo. These same people may be even more shocked to learn that today's Cypriot "resolution" is merely the first of many such coercive interventions into personal wealth, first in Europe, and then everywhere else.

For the benefit of those people, we wish to point them to our article from September 2011, "The "Muddle Through" Has Failed: BCG Says "There May Be Only Painful Ways Out Of The Crisis", which predicted and explained all of this and much more. What else did the September BCG study conclude? Simply that such mandatory, coercive wealth tax is merely the beginning for a world in which there was some $21 trillion in excess debt as of 2009, a number which has since ballooned to over $30 trillion. And with inflation woefully late in appearing and "inflating away" said debt overhang, Europe first is finally moving to Plan B, and is using Cyrprus as its Guniea Pig.

For those who missed it the first time, here it is again. Somehow we think many more people will listen this time around:

Restructuring the debt overhang in the euro zone would require financing and would be a daunting task. In order to finance controlled restructuring, politicians could well conclude that it was necessary to tax the existing wealth of the private sector. Many politicians would see taxing financial assets as the fairest way of resolving the problem. Taxing existing financial assets would acknowledge one fact: these investments are not as valuable as their owners think, as the debtors (governments, households, and corporations) will be unable to meet their commitments. Exhibit 3 shows the one-time tax on financial assets required to provide the necessary funds for an orderly restructuring.





For most countries, a haircut of 11 to 30 percent would be sufficient to cover the costs of an orderly debt restructuring. Only in Greece, Spain, and Portugal would the burden for the private sector be significantly higher; in Ireland, it would be too high because the financial assets of the Irish people are smaller than the required adjustment of debt levels. This underscores the dimension of the Irish real estate and debt bubble.



In the overall context of the future of the euro zone, politicians would need to propose a broader sharing of the burden so that taxpayers in such countries as Germany, France, and the Netherlands would contribute more than the share required to reduce their own debt load. This would be unpopular, but the banks and insurance companies in these countries would benefit. To ensure a socially acceptable sharing of the burden, politicians would no doubt decide to tax financial assets only above a certain threshold沃100,000, for example. Given that any such tax would be meant as a one-time correction of current debt levels, they would need to balance it by removing wealth taxes and capital-gains taxes. The drastic action of imposing a tax on assets would probably make it easier politically to lower income taxes in order to stimulate further growth. (See Exhibit 4.)



Curiously, not even BCG expected the initial shot across the bow to be so bad that everyone, not just those above the 100,000 threshold would be impaired. Alas, that is the sad reality in Europe, where as the chart above shows, a total of 6.1 trillion with a T in additional wealth confiscation tax is coming.

Oh, and US of A... fear not - your turn is coming too: with a price tag of 8.2 trillion in wealth tax pending as of 2009. This number is now somewhere north of 15 trillion.



The full BCG study which we urge everyone to read

***********************************************

look the Paultards have it up:
 http://www.ronpaulforums.com/showthread.php?407932-For
also at conspiracy news clearing house before it's news
 link to beforeitsnews.com
converative intelectual wanna bes
 link to www.americanthinker.com

its written by someone using the moniker of a character from fight club which is suppose to be mysterious shit, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zero_Hedge

Zero Hedge was founded in January 2009.[1] Posts are signed "Tyler Durden," a character in the Chuck Palahniuk book and movie Fight Club,[2] reflecting the news site's activist posture.[1] Despite speculation that "Tyler Durden" is a pseudonym of Daniel Ivandjiiski,[2][3] who was penalized for insider trading in New York in September 2008,[4] Ivandjiiski denies being a founder of Zero Hedge. Rather, he says he is one of several writers contributing to the site under the pseudonym.[4] In an interview, "Durden" said there were four editors at Zero Hedge[1] but another editor says there are up to 40.[note 1][2] Editors have experience in various areas of finance and operations, differing from journalists who become experts about finance as they write about it, but have no practical work experience in the sector.[1] The online newspaper publishes anonymously to protect the editors from retaliation for dissident speech.[1] Durden maintains this protects its integrity, objectivity and independence, as well. Durden cites the First Amendment to the United States Constitution and a 1995 U.S. Supreme Court case, McIntyre v. Ohio Elections Commission,[1] which upheld anonymity as a right of free speech.[5][note 2]


great. they should check their whois tho:
Registrant:
ABC Media Ltd
P.O. Box 3
Sofia, Sofia 1784
BG

Domain name: ZEROHEDGE.COM

Administrative Contact:
Hristozov, Georgi  abcmedialtd@hotmail.com
P.O. Box 3
Sofia, Sofia 1784
BG
+359 2 875 35 99
Technical Contact:
Hristozov, Georgi  abcmedialtd@hotmail.com
P.O. Box 3
Sofia, Sofia 1784
BG
+359 2 875 35 99

Registrar of Record: easyDNS Technologies, Inc.
Record last updated on 02-May-2012.
Record expires on 11-Jan-2017.
Record created on 11-Jan-2009.

Registrar Domain Name Help Center:
 http://helpwiki.easydns.com

Domain servers in listed order:
DNS1.EASYDNS.COM
DNS4.EASYDNS.INFO
DNS2.EASYDNS.NET
DNS3.EASYDNS.ORG


i couldn't access it when it was first published. anyone who did the same day it was published is op or connected to op. it's available to the public now, because op is watching this thread or was informed. god there are some dumb b!tchs on imc who really do think most readers fell of a turnip truck. this website is some kind of scare tactic investment scam

@........ 20.Mar.2013 21:18

.

"god there are some dumb b!tchs on imc who really do think most readers fell of a turnip truck. this website is some kind of scare tactic investment scam"

Every day zerohedge posts up to a dozen detailed, well-researched articles on the sorry state of banks and governments around the world.

The articles document the massive ponzi scheme of public and private debt that is being piled up all around the world; the efforts of banks, government officials, and central bankers to keep the fraud going; and the tremors and warning signs of the deafening financial implosion that is coming.

Maybe the charts, tables, facts, and events are all beyond you? Maybe an exponential moon-launch debt-to-GDP-ratio chart doesn't scare the shit out of you? Maybe you think politicians and bankers have some magic fix to this snow-balling debt catastrophe?

I suggest you make the effort to read 10 ZH articles and then come back to this thread.

what's ur point? 21.Mar.2013 02:15

???

>>>>Every day zerohedge posts up to a dozen detailed, well-researched articles on the sorry state of banks and governments around the world.

well researched by who's standard? it's fear mongering ultra right spam. no more credible than the daily paul bullshit
the fact paultards think it's credible is enough for anyone to have doubts

this cyprus thing, like others have said, just some mafia bi!tches house of cards falling down. maybe it'll hit the rest of us, maybe not.
>>>>Cyprus is an off-shore banking haven. Many russian oligarchs stash millions of euros there.

it's not just russians. ya got all sorts of dirty money, black ops/pr budget funds etc.
oh yeah it'll be FUCKING HAILARIOUS to see all the informants little nest eggs go poof over night
*fixes popcorn*

@.... 21.Mar.2013 14:29

repost

Sure, they're a bunch of rightists, more like libertarian, and egotistical. You, ..., seem pretty egotistical yourself, and your last statement is insulting. The site's informative, and with perspective that might enlighten only those who hang around the sites on the opposite side of the spectrum. (That is, if you're not filled with hate, like ....) I didn't copy and paste the whole article because it's an ongoing situation, there were before it, and after it, other articles related to the progression of the situation. Posting the site and a short blurb with a link seemed the most intelligent way to let someone know that it is a source for some news and what can be had afterward rather than some singualr post here where people allow their cynacism to flower in comments, then forget about it and leave the burden of reporting to what could become just a mainstream blog of their favorite biased favor. These guys are hypocites, in my opinion, but they know what they're talking about in the ins and outs of finance, are irreverant, even if they make their money in the same system and manner they criticise, and they do so with depth that defies most sites. I've visited the site regularly for more than a couple of years, and they're way ahead of news on things like high-frequency trading (and they deplore it) and gives one a sense of why the stock market is so high while what masquerades for an economy for most is in the pits. They give news on the Federal Reserve that you'd have to go to financial pages to get. I accept that people can have other opinions than I do, I'm willing to read those opinions in a lot of cases, just to be informed of what the other side thinks, I've realized that Bloomberg really does speak some truths sometimes if one's informed enough to know what is truth and what isn't, and you won't be informed by sitting drooling in hate and limiting yourself to one side building some shell about yourself and type comments like this:

"i couldn't access it when it was first published. anyone who did the same day it was published is op or connected to op. it's available to the public now, because op is watching this thread or was informed. god there are some dumb b!tchs on imc who really do think most readers fell of a turnip truck. this website is some kind of scare tactic investment scam"

That is one of the most insulting and cases of useless drivel one can encounter here in comments. It's assumptions are childish and prejudiced without any background. The site's available because it is, every day. I don't (wouldn't) pay for access to this site or any other. How badly did you hurt your head when you fell off the turnip truck? Apparently not enough to crack your prejudical shell.

@??? 21.Mar.2013 21:23

.

"this cyprus thing, like others have said, just some mafia bi!tches house of cards falling down. maybe it'll hit the rest of us, maybe not."

Maybe magical pink unicorns with saddle bags full of gold will descend from the sky to pay off these oceans of debt around the world.

Or maybe you need to initiate your own detailed investigation into the ever-growing, exponentially-expanding level of debts, debt-money, and derivatives across all sectors of society, globally.

Maybe you should start with reading those 10 ZH articles.

@. 21.Mar.2013 22:46

this is moar funni

>>>Or maybe you need to initiate your own detailed investigation into the ever-growing, exponentially-expanding level of debts, debt-money, and derivatives across all sectors of society, globally.
Maybe you should start with reading those 10 ZH articles.

naw, it's more fun to hear what bullshit rationalization you'll dream up for the next right wing spam. that and i'll be fucked if i give 10z tards my isp/dns/etc. all those ultra right webwhores are honey pots.

the funniest thing? for alla the OMG THE CONTELPROZ R GONNA GET US bs from the radical right, those websites are the WORST for security. lol
*eats popcorn*

The Portland 9/11 Truth Alliance is behind the Bank Bailout in Cyprus 22.Mar.2013 12:07

rex

Petros Evdokas is from Cyprus, and he's the one who set up the banker bailout in there. Tim Titrude is in Cyprus right now with Evdokas, negotiating terms for the Norwegian banking cartel and the Nobel Committee. The Marrs Hill Church sent Evdokas and Titrude to Cyprus, where they met with David Irving to establish a Stormfront chapter that will serve as bodyguards for the bankers.

Let us never tolerate outrageous conspiracy theories 23.Mar.2013 17:34

George W. Bush

"Let us never tolerate outrageous conspiracy theories concerning the attacks of September the 11th; malicious lies that attempt to shift the blame away from the terrorists, themselves, away from the guilty."
-- George W. Bush, addressing the UN on Jun 4, 2006.