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actions & protests | genetic engineering

Just Label It - the GMO labeling song by Mike Adams, the Health Ranger

This is a cute, catchy song with a really good message. We should all have the right to know if we're eating Genetically Modified Food. Do your research -- it's bad for us and the planet.
 http://youtu.be/aEVw5Jl4c2g

homepage: homepage: http://www.youtube.com/user/TheHealthRanger


Meanwhile 10.Oct.2012 21:53

Den Mark, Vancouver WA

Californians will vote on Prop 37 november 6, & it'll be interesting to see if they ignore tens of millions of dollars that monsanto, nestle, coke, pepsi & others are spending on ads to defeat it.

Washingtonians are gathering signatures to put Initiative 522 on the ballot next year. We expect those same vile companies to spend their millions against us, too.

Meanwhile, how many "progressives" in OR, CA, & WA buy products from those villains. Too many. Far too many. Pisses me off.

question 11.Oct.2012 01:21

t

What is health?

Isn't it obvious? 11.Oct.2012 08:07

Shaker

They'll spend millions to avoid putting a few words on labels? Isn't it obvious that the the arguement that it's 'too expensive' is just bull? Isn't it also obvious that they don't want you to know what's really in the food? Don't people think anymore, and just swallow that bull?

And some wonder why many of us have lost faith in the system. Christ, I'd be wary of eating the insects and the rats anymore...Don't you think even Ayn Rand would ask what's in the glop on her plate?

a bit more... 14.Oct.2012 09:04

some thoughts

Support comprehensive labeling requirements for food products everywhere in the US. Whether one thinks that producers have the right to put into their output whatever they want or not, we should have the right to knowledge of that 'whatever'. Placing the arguments in the category of 'freedom' shouldn't be an issue.

Seems a society should have the right to set the informational parameters in which members operate. Isn't that the basis of societies and law, not just an exercise of the powerful? Producers, whether they think so or not, are members; hell, have been given the rights of discrete members. Even if the reason society banns something is because of some cultural bugaboo, the burden of that knowledge shouldn't rest with a member so removed from the process that they have to spend personally productive time becoming an investigator into proprietary and guarded recipes. Just give me the right to be concerned about a specific ingredient or combination of ingredients. One isn't asking whether a producer prove something is 'good' or 'bad' for a consumer or why they use what they use, just that they be informed of what the producer knows and intentionally puts into the contents so that a member can make their own decision. We have come to the point of scientific discretion to know that there is a real difference between corn and GM corn. Personally, I can swallow the idea that a producer will label something as being natural, and somehow GM leaks into the mix, but I can't see the idea that 'corn is corn' and don't worry. They do enough to tell the consumer that what they're eating has been in contact with equipment that's used to produce products containing nuts because of allergies, don't they? Mistakes may happen, but they should be true mistakes. It's more like being informed about whether something meets kosher standards. The burden of consequence then lies with the consumer. Honestly, to me, it's a matter of trust, and I won't eat something about which I have a gross question of trust, whatever a producer does or doesn't put on a label. I'm willing to pay for that trust, so the question of its expense is moot. It seems very inefficient to leave such things to lawyers and damage litigation, and, to me, it would seem that an intelligent and forthright producer wouldn't want to surrender their profits to lawyers and damage litigation.

Using this reasoning, I have lost trust in producers that would resist comprehensive listing of ingredients on labels. It's insulting to me to see labels that boldly announce that that they use ALL NATURAL, and in small lettering beneath (herbs and spices). I wouldn't buy the stuff simply because I know that practice in labels is disingenuous and they're trying to take advantage any lack of diligence on the part of a consumer. While I won't (and the courts won't either) say it's dishonest, it's certainly disrespectful. I try not to make dealing with the disrespectful a common practice in my life, don't you?