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Water Fluoridation - "No Evidence of Beneficial Effect" (5 Year Study of 51,683 in Portlan

"...the effects were generally small". "In Portland metro, there was no evidence of a beneficial effect of fluoridation on total costs; in fact, costs were generally higher among members living in the community water fluoridated (CWF) than in the (NF) nonfluoridated districts of the metropolitan area."
Water Fluoridation

"No Evidence of Beneficial Effect"

(5 Year Study of 51,683 in Portland)

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 http://youtu.be/gGLPEJTYS70

- "...the effects were generally small". "In Portland metro, there was no evidence of a beneficial effect of fluoridation on total costs; in fact, costs were generally higher among members living in the community water fluoridated (CWF) than in the (NF) nonfluoridated districts of the metropolitan area."

"A comparison of dental treatment utilization and costs by HMO members living in fluoridated and nonfluoridated areas" (J Public Health Dent. 2007 Fall;67(4):224-33)

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed?term=Fluoride%20hmo

Data from Kaiser Permanente

additional quote:

"...Community Water Fluoridation (CWF) cost-effectiveness analyses have not typically included reduced caries treatment costs, thereby overestimating the marginal change in health care costs attributable to CWF..."

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"Fluoride content of solid foods impacts daily intake" (Journal of Public Health Dentistry 72 (2012) 128--134)

 link to www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov..

"the basis for the so-called "optimal" fluoride intake. It is unclear exactly how the upper limit of that range came into existence. This range has since been designated or stated as the optimal level for fluoride intake by many researchers, although there has been no scientific validation of this range for being considered "optimal." There has never been a clear definition as to what the range is optimal for; is it for caries prevention or is it for the prevention of fluorosis? This "optimal" range was estimated before the widespread use of topical fluorides and other fluoride exposures, and prior to the generalized, widespread distribution of beverages...It is important to look at many of these different sources of fluoride intake in light of the increasing prevalence of dental fluorosis and greater emphasis on esthetic perceptions currently being seen in the United States and other developed nations..."

"about 25 percent of children at 6 months of age ingested amountsgreater than the tolerable upper intake level (UL) of 0.7 mg/ l day"

Compare this level to .01, which is often referred to as an adequate intake for children 6 months old. Mother's milk is .004 mg/l (ppm).

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In fact, it is not unheard of for the number of dental cavities to go down after fluoridation ends. In another four year study from, Patterns of dental caries following the cessation of water fluoridation, it says, "The prevalence of caries (assessed in 5927 children, grades 2, 3, 8, 9) decreased over time in the fluoridation ended community while remaining unchanged in the fluoridated community."

Patterns of dental caries following the cessation of water fluoridation.

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11153562

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Other studies by Gerardo Maupomé, lead author of the Portland study referenced in the video:

: link to www.iusd.iupui.edu

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17565898

"No significant relationship was found between fluoride exposure and dental caries in permanent dentition."

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17436973

"Fluoride exposure does not appear to be reducing the caries prevalence or caries severity in these high-altitude communities."

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16948677

"We were also unable to identify any significant reductions in caries-related procedures for individuals receiving a fluoride intervention, compared with those who did not, when stratified by risk level."

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18155078

At-home or in-office fluoride application does not significantly reduce subsequent caries-related procedures in ambulatory adults of any caries-risk level.

 http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17899898

"...a minority of Indiana health professionals (17 percent) correctly identified that remineralization was fluoride's predominant mode of action"..."The majority of dental professionals surveyed were unaware of the current understanding of fluoride's predominant posteruptive mode of action through remineralization of incipient carious lesions... Educational efforts are needed to promote the appropriate use of fluoride."

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