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corporate dominance | economic justice

Solo geniuses who scorn the society that provides the shoulders they sit on

The mythology of the solo genius purports to justify massive inequality because the "solo genius" single-handedly created a popular product and thus single-handedly brought prosperity upon the land. In reality, without the infrastructure that government provides in the form of educational institutions, a court system that adjudicates commercial disputes, police and the military to suppress dissent at home and abroad, an ever larger basket of subsidies, and "free trade" agreements that promote corporate interests above human rights, billionaires would not be able to become billionaires.
The lone inventor is an archetype of long standing. The image remains, but, particularly in the United States, the image of the inventor has morphed from Thomas Edison and his cluttered laboratory to the hard-charging entrepreneur who single-handedly builds businesses.

The change in imagery mirrors the emphasis on wealth in U.S. popular culture, and the tendency to either defer to or scorn people based on perceptions of their wealth. Such imagery also serves as a particularly enticing carrot to dangle in front of those who aren't millionaires, allowing them to entertain ideas that, if only they work hard enough, they too can accumulate fortunes.

Nobody creates a product, builds a company or makes a scientific discovery all on their own. There are engineers who design the product's physical form, assembly-line workers who assemble the product and advertising agencies who create the demand for the product. For scientific discoveries, there are public investments in equipment or laboratory facilities, and scientific discoveries are often the basis for new products. For any of these, there are schools and universities, often paid for with public money, that provided the education that developed the skills of the creator or discoverer.

Then there is the social structure that enabled the millionaire to become wealthy through an invention or the creation of a popular product or through rising to the top of a large corporation or simply through being a popular entertainer or athlete. (We'll set aside for now the fact that inheritance is the path most often trod to wealth.)

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