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anti-racism | community building

Race Talks - Tuesday, July 10 - Kennedy School

Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue
A presentation by the Fair Housing Council of Oregon.

(Last month I went to the Talk and the room was packed, and it was an excellent presentation)
Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue

"Fasten Your Seatbelts! It's Been A Bumpy Ride: Historic Tours of Discrimination in Portland"
Kennedy School - Gymnasium |
Tuesday, July 10
7 p.m. |
Free |
All ages welcome

A presentation by the Fair Housing Council of Oregon.

There was a time when Oregon was known as the most discriminatory state north of the Mason-Dixon Line. Until 1926, it was illegal for African Americans to live in Oregon, which was home to more than 70,000 Ku Klux Klan members. "Sundown laws" prevented Asians and African Americans from even staying overnight in many cities. These cruel facts are now history, but a history that has been forgotten by many. Now, here is great opportunity to learn more about this important but dark past and participate in discussions about key topics.

About Race Talks: Opportunities for Dialogue

This series deals with race in Oregon, both historically and up to the present time, to provide learning experiences that support the development of racial identity and sensitivity.

Each month, Kennedy School hosts a presentation on a different topic of ethnicity and racial elements in Oregon history, given by educators and/or experts in the topic at hand. The aim is to provide educational and learning experiences that support the development of intercultural sensitivity and racial identity.

 http://www.mcmenamins.com/events/104204-Race-Talks-Opportunities-for-Dialogue
(information on this page was from the Kenndy School calendar link)

some Race Talks Links I Found 01.Jul.2012 18:04

Ben Waiting

(1)  http://youtu.be/TUCBp-plVVM {{ Recomended }} Race Talks 3/2012

(2) Race Talks YouTube account that is separate from the McMenaminsVideos YouTube account
 http://www.youtube.com/user/racetalks01.

(3)  http://youtu.be/UM1qRzovajU
This presentation is about the controversial new North Williams bike lane proposition. Four speakers give their opinions. The first speaker, historian Tom Robinson, owner of historicphotoarchive.com, gives a speech about the history of the Williams/Albina neighborhood, including slides of historic Portland photos. He enlightens us about why race would be an issue in the bike lane proposition. The second speaker is Ellen Vanderslice, who works in the City of Portland Department of Transportation, and is head of the North Williams Traffic Operations Safety Project Stakeholder Advisory Committee (they are responsible for planning how the bike lane will be implemented if at all). Her speech also features slides. Third is Jonathan Maus, a prolific professional blogger and founder/editor in chief of bikeportland.org, speaking his pro-bike-lane opinion. The fourth speaker is Noni Causey, a staunch North Portlander, education specialist, small business owner, and committee member of North Williams Traffic Operations Safety Project.


(4)  link to youtu.be

8/4/2011 "Race Talks Verbal Synopsis"


[5]  http://youtu.be/4WLf897KrIE [8/9/11] "Asian Perspective Race Talk"

[6]  http://youtu.be/b-FrmO-555I "Millennials Race Talk" 10/11/11

[7]  http://youtu.be/Vk7HvENNn_I "Muslim Experience in Oregon" 4/12/11

[8]  http://youtu.be/LWBle0i2fjs "Latino Race Talk" 9/3/2011

[9]  http://youtu.be/wA5XGI7_li0 "Socialization Race Talk" 4/11/11

[10]  http://youtu.be/zDuxDqLRVNw "LGBTQ presentation at Race Talks" 6/15/11

[11]  http://youtu.be/jKf4zwm9Tyw "Native American Race Talk" 1/12/12
[February 2011 was mentioned as the first Race Talk]

Video: Race Talks - Why are there so few black people in Oregon 6.12.12 03.Jul.2012 06:53

Joe Anybody iam@joeanybody.com

 http://youtu.be/yJ3sIXdQ2xw
(50 min. video)

Topic: "Why are there so few black people in Oregon?"
Filmed at Kennedy School on 6.12.12 in Portland Oregon

A presentation by Walidah Imarisha, Professor, Black Studies Department, Portland State University.