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Lets see how long it will take until they remove this post. 10:39 am April 12

From the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition

Health effects of vegan diets
From the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition
 http://www.ajcn.org/content/89/5/1627S.short

Health effects of vegan diets1,2,3

Winston J Craig

1From the Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, Berrien Springs, MI.

↵2 Presented at the symposium, "Fifth International Congress on Vegetarian Nutrition," held in Loma Linda, CA, March 4-6, 2008.

↵3 Reprints not available. Address correspondence to WJ Craig, Department of Nutrition and Wellness, Andrews University, Marsh Hall, Room 301, Berrien Springs, MI 49104-0210. E-mail: wcraig{at}andrews.edu.

Abstract

Recently, vegetarian diets have experienced an increase in popularity. A vegetarian diet is associated with many health benefits because of its higher content of fiber, folic acid, vitamins C and E, potassium, magnesium, and many phytochemicals and a fat content that is more unsaturated. Compared with other vegetarian diets, vegan diets tend to contain less saturated fat and cholesterol and more dietary fiber. Vegans tend to be thinner, have lower serum cholesterol, and lower blood pressure, reducing their risk of heart disease. However, eliminating all animal products from the diet increases the risk of certain nutritional deficiencies. Micronutrients of special concern for the vegan include vitamins B-12 and D, calcium, and long-chain n-3 (omega-3) fatty acids. Unless vegans regularly consume foods that are fortified with these nutrients, appropriate supplements should be consumed. In some cases, iron and zinc status of vegans may also be of concern because of the limited bioavailability of these minerals.