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Ecology, Welfare Ranching, & the Persecution of Wolves: Film and Panel Discussion.

Join the Student Animal Coalition for a screening of Lords of Nature: Life in the Land of Great Predators!
Check out the trailer here:
 http://lordsofnature.org/trailer1.html

This screening will be accompanied by a short panel discussion after the film. Join Brooks Fahy, the executive director of Predator Defense, Wally Sykes of Trapfree Oregon and North-Eastern Oregon Ecosystems and Karin Coulter, a long time activist who founded the Blue Mountains Biodiversity Project as we all discuss the importance of predators in Oregon's ecosystems, our delicate relationships with these predators as well as the political significance of their existence and the repercussions of their removal from the endangered species list.

PARKING and TRANSPORTATION INFO:

 http://pdx.edu/transportation/visitors-events

AND parking lot map:
 http://pdx.edu/sites/www.pdx.edu.transportation/files/Parking%20Map.pdf

Need more information?

From the Lords of Nature Website:
"LORDS OF NATURE: Life in a Land of Great Predators tells the story of a science now discovering top carnivores as revitalizing forces of nature, and of a society now learning tolerance for beasts they once banished.

Green Fire filmmakers, Karen and Ralf Meyer, follow scientists Bill Ripple and Bob Beschta of Oregon State University, two leading pioneers in the quest to decipher the great predators' role in the web of life. Ripple and Beschta are repeatedly finding ecosystems maintained by their apex predators—and more ominously, degraded by their absence. Their bottom line reveals top predators as keystones in the stability and balance of nature. As Beschta says, "Whether it's cougars in Zion, or wolves in Yellowstone National Park, the presence of that predator is crucial in maintaining that system through time."

Their discoveries are both vital by nature and far-reaching in scope, echoing a mounting body of research from all corners of the globe that increasingly reveals the top predators as key drivers of the planet's stability and diversity of life. But these discoveries have also raised the obvious question of whether and how to incorporate the big predators into societies facing conflicts and fears with their return.

Lords of Nature traces the path of legendary naturalist and writer, Aldo Leopold. What Leopold warned seventy years ago, scientists from around the world now confirm: That a land lacking its top predators is a land subject to decay. And vice versa a land with the great beasts in sufficient numbers is a land far more diverse and resilient.

Green Fire ventures to the rural communities of Minnesota, interviewing ranchers, farmers, hunters, and wildlife managers who are living among more than three thousand wolves, the highest population in the lower 48 states.

The producers also profile two of the largest sheep operators in Idaho, who are raising eyebrows with their stunning success at raising sheep in a land running again with wolves—all without killing the wolves. These success stories are serving notice that with proper technique, and a dose of tolerance, people and predators can indeed co-exist."

Need some more information about our guests?
 http://www.predatordefense.org/
 http://www.trapfreeoregon.org/
 http://www.bluemtnsbiodiversityproject.org/

This is going to be an amazing event and we hope to see you all there!
This event is free, and open to the public!

Please invite your friends!

Portland State Multicultural-Center
Portland, OR
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people might attend 09.Mar.2012 09:55

furry rabbit

if you gave the time date and place right up front----just a thought

Date & Time 10.Mar.2012 11:00

Student Animal Liberation Coalition

Friday March 16th, 6:00pm-9:00pm

Wisconsin allowing wolves to be hunted! 13.Mar.2012 12:31

headsup

 link to www.nytimes.com

"Specifically, a bill in the Wisconsin Legislature to authorize a hunting season on wolves. The State Senate has approved it, and the Assembly is set to consider the bill on Tuesday.

Hunters approve of the season, and Republicans are all for it, as are some Democrats. Wildlife biologists have a number of criticisms and suggestions about the bill involving how, when and how many wolves should be killed.

But the Great Lakes Indian Fish and Game Commission, which represents 11 tribes of the Ojibwe (also known as the Chippewa, or Anishinaabe) in Wisconsin, Minnesota and Michigan, opposes the hunt on the basis of religious principle and tradition. "