portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article commentary oregon & cascadia

actions & protests | environment occupy portland

Occupy Farmland

Most of us know little or nothing about how our daily lives effect the planet and cause the problems both environmentally and politically. Taking to the streets is important and a great step towards the culture shift needed. Lets move into Occupy Farmlands. Getting ourselves practiced in the ways of local food and economy is vital.
Most of us know little or nothing about how our daily lives effect the planet and cause the problems both environmentally and politically. Taking to the streets is important and a great step towards the culture shift needed. Lets move into Occupy Farmlands. Getting ourselves practiced in the ways of local food and economy is vital.

I moved to a farm 6 years ago. Dropped my corporate job, sold what I could of my belongings and went for it. I have found such beauty in the simple farm life. Making food from my and my neighbors gardens is not only better tasting, it supports the people and practices I want to support.

I spent time trying to bring the system down from inside. I spent time trying to tell people to change. Then I did something awesome. I CHANGED!

We must get control over the basics we need to thrive. Food, water, energy and community are just a few blocks away from all of us. When the elite control the basics we need to survive they have the power. Connect with your tribe. Build the infrastructure that we need to replace the crumbling system in which we currently reside. We have no more time to consider change. We must do it now no matter what our "leaders" say is important.

Resist, Revolt, Rebuild........

I think that's a great idea! 05.Jan.2012 07:20

Jody Paulson

It's also a very old one. Maybe its time has finally come.

Billy Bragg The World Turned Upside Down (the Digger's song):  http://youtu.be/lxW5yvpeHg4

farm facts 05.Jan.2012 19:17

jb

1. how big is your farm?

2. how many people share the work?

3. how many calories are produced?

4. approximately where is the farm?

5. how can the poor get their farm?

on board 06.Jan.2012 20:47

universal truth sleuth

Awesome and inspiring. I'm currently living the city life, but I believe that changing our communities into more sustainable, self-sufficient and neighborly places is just as important. I think we should strive for changing our communities from the inside as well as having people venture to the outside for self-sufficiency. I applaud your dramatic change of lifestyle and hope to do something similar myself one day. In the meantime, I'm here, learning how to fix, build, grow and make things for myself and encouraging others to do the same. I see the consciousness slowly shifting back toward a more agrarian, do-it-yourself style and it gives me hope for the future

Response 08.Jan.2012 09:35

Revolutionaryfarmer@yahoo.com

1. Farm = 20 acres
2. Setting up to feed and energize around 50 and 50 more in local community
3. Three meals a day for 15 full time people about Nearly 90% local product use now
4. We are in Costa Rica. I moved here form Oregon. Many others come from all over. I have thousands of friends states doing the same thing.
5. Co-ops are the key. I am not big on personal ownership of farmland. Too much work if done right for one family unit. Refer to Mollisons Permaculture practices. Most of the people in our organization are not wealthy (with money) but are rich in time and energy.

And we should all be doing what we can to build a new type of economy. From the farms to the cities. But cities have some hard work ahead of them. Much smaller scale needed. We need to spread back out not keep crwoding financial centers hoping for a piece of unsustainable pie.

BUFA 2012 application & deadlines 10.Jan.2012 09:01

Ben Waiting

 https://web.multco.us/sustainability/bufa-2012-application-and-deadlines

We value a diverse community, built on inclusion, equity and cultural competence. Together we can create vibrant, strong communities and a solid foundation for future generations. Minorities, women, and individuals with disabilities are encouraged to apply.

==============
==============

BUFA application period is open from November 15, 2011 to January 15, 2012.

Deadlines for Applications

Early Bird Registration: Apply no later than December 15, 2011 at 5:00 pm PST for 10% tuition discount (applications must be recieved by this date, not postmarked if mailed)
Final Application Deadline: January 15, 2012 by 5:00 pm PST (applications must be received by this deadline, not postmarked if mailed)
BUFA 2011 Program starts April 4, 2012

==============
==============



BUFA 2012 Application 11.14.11

application/pdf iconBUFA 2012 application 11.14.11 - (199 KB) download here:

 https://web.multco.us/sites/default/files/sustainability/documents/bufa_program_-_general_application_2012_11.14.11.pdf

Selection Criteria for All Applicants

1. Must be 18 years of age or older.
2. Must be able to lift 50 pounds
3. Must able to work for up to 7 hours of continuous strenuous outdoor labor.
4. Demonstrated aptitude for: gardening, or small to large scale farming; documented by experience, interests and/ or education.
5. Demonstrated ability and/ or interest in self-employment, starting and running a small business.
6. Future plans include small or large scale farming.
Program Tracks

TRACK 1 - The full program including classroom, in-field training and field trips.
Cost = $2,700 if you apply before December 15, 2011.
Cost = $3,000 after December 15, 2011.
*Work-trade Scholarships are available for TRACK 1.

OR

TRACK 2 - Includes classroom training and field trips. Does not include in-field training.
Cost = $1,080 if you apply before December 15, 2011.
Cost = $1,200 after December 15, 2011.
No scholarships available for TRACK 2.

*There are 6 work-trade scholarships available for TRACK 1.

Work-Trade Scholarships require an additional 125 hours of in-field work through the end of the 2012 program. Apprentices accepted to the program and granted the Work-Trade Scholarship will be responsible for $100 in processing and tuition fees.