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Video: Coalition of Communities of Color Report on Multnomah County

Power Point presentation by Julia Meiers, Coordinator for Coalition for Communities of Color regarding relationship between the various races comprising Multnomah County Oregon.

Coalition of Communities of Color Report on Multnomah County: An Unsettling Profile
Results of the study show that Multnomah County, and often more specifically, Portland, has a greater disparity between whites and people of color than the national average, and even Seattle Washington.

Many of the slides compare Whites to Communities of Color. Some slides compare Whites, Asians, Native Americans, Latino, and African American. An additional category of "African Refugees" is sometimes added to the African American category and Pacific Islander to the Asian category.

One slide compares average earnings of Whites to Communities of Color, with Whites averaging $33.095 and Communities of Color $16.636 annually.
Another shows that poverty levels of Communities of Color are double that of Whites.

A slide portraying the percentage of children removed from the home at some point in the child welfare process shows that 6.3 children per 1000 are removed nationwide with a 10.2 removal in Oregon. Multnomah County is %15.2.
Of these children specific communities are taken and kept. African Americans.....32 out of 1000 children are taken and kept by the child welfare system. Native Americans, it's 218 Native American children per 1000 are kept. Basically it's one in four.

Julia also discusses the various educational attainments amongst the various Communities of Color, Native American, Asian, Latino, White and African American.
In 2007, at the same education levels, people of color have 43.8% worse unemployment than whites. One year later this deteriorated to 51%.
Under the title, "Housed Precariously," more people of color are burdened by their housing (spending more than %30 of their incomes on housing,) with 67% of White's owning their homes compared to 47% of Communities of Color.
Also, more people of color are in the sub prime mortgage market and defaulting on loans. In 2006, 50% of mortgages were high cost for people of color compared to 18% for whites.(USA Data)

Communities of Color make up about 20% of the Oregon population, yet received %9.6 Foundation Funding compared to 90.4% for White. This was from a 2008 report released by the Foundation Center entitled, "Giving to Communities of Color in Oregon."
For example, Latinos at the time of the report were 11% of the population, yet received 1.6% of the funding; Asian and Pacific Islanders make up about 5% of the population, yet received .1% of the dollars.

The Coalition of Communities of Color are in the process of issuing 6 more reports on the various Communities of Color.

This presentation is about 50 minutes in length.

Coalition of Communities of Color Report on Multnomah County: An Unsettling Profile

homepage: homepage: http://coalitioncommunitiescolor.org/


One of the Six Papers Mentioned............. 29.Nov.2011 15:59

Jim

The Native American Community in Multnomah County.


 http://coalitioncommunitiescolor.org/docs/NATIVE_AMERICAN_REPORT.pdf

Thanks, Jim 30.Nov.2011 07:23

a 99%er

This report is a scathing indictment of progressives in Portland, Oregon & Multnomah County, specifically.

So often, when I've talked to people about this report (and the Urban League report about Black Oregon), I have heard comments of disbelief that things "could be this bad" in our "liberal" city. This is EXACTLY the problem- that well-meaning people have not taken the situation seriously- even in Portland's so-called peace & social justice community.

Now it the time to change this. Read the CCC report (it's online) or get a hard copy. Contact the Urban League to read that report, too.

And let us act each day to make change happen and also let us NEVER again say that we "didn't know" how bad things are for people of color in Oregon.