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Greece: people of keratea successfully resist police; construction of new Athens landfill

Residents are argueing that creating an open dump is a major environmental crime threatening the residents health and well-being, as well as the nearby archaeological sites, the Mouzaki stream as well as underground waters and minerals. Its construction serves only certain private interests, and the state has responded to the residents challenge with heavy repression and media slander.
VIDEO:

daytime resistance / from a few days ago (april 14)
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ELRZCAPIIdY

nighttime street fights / early february
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ou1d-uVaqbg

local police station attacked at night; police vehicles turned over / early january
 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-cdEr_kYzqc

many videos: early resistance, school strikes & occupations
 http://xytasimaineiantistasi.blogspot.com/2010/12/blog-post_5359.html

documentary: police violence in lavrion (65 minutes, greek language)
 http://forkeratea.blogspot.com/2011/01/police-violence-in-lavrion-greece.html

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STORIES:

The social struggle in Keratea-Lavreotiki: A brief chronicle (11 December-22 March)
 http://en.contrainfo.espiv.net/2011/03/28/the-social-struggle-in-keratea-lavreotiki/

Many recent blog posts about the social struggle in Keratea
 http://www.occupiedlondon.org/blog/tag/keratea-anti-landfill-struggle/

Update on the anti-dump construction struggle in Keratea, 11/12-15/1
 http://rioter.info/2010/12/20/keratea/

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Below story reposted from:  http://anarchistnews.org/?q=node/14445

Friday, April 15 -- As unemployment rises and austerity bites ever harder, tempers seem to fray faster than ever these days in Greece, with citizens of all stripes increasingly thumbing their noses at authority. Some refuse to pay increased highway tolls and public transport tickets, and there has been a rise in politicians being heckled - even assaulted - by constituents. It's a fight that has galvanized the town, from the mayor and the local priest to shopkeepers, farmers, schoolteachers and teenagers. "We live and breathe to finish our jobs for the day, to go to the blockades, to participate, to sacrifice ourselves in preventing the landfill from happening," said Nikos Manolis, a local resident and bus owner. Over the past four months, locals have developed increasingly inventive roadblocks to stop contractors from getting to the proposed dump site. They have parked trucks across the street and built piles of rubble and dirt. Apparently in it for the long haul, they have erected a wooden hut by the side of the road to serve as protest headquarters, complete with campaign posters, news clippings and children's drawings of the riots. Their latest move was a nighttime expedition to dig a shoulder-high trench across both lanes of the highway. That was one step too far for authorities, who on Thursday sent in road crews - protected by police - to repair the damage. Within hours the confrontation had degenerated. Masked youths hurled firebombs and rocks at riot police who responded with rubber baton rounds and repeated volleys of tear gas. A police helicopter circled overhead. Residents argue the landfill will devalue the region and pose a health hazard. The town's mayor says local authorities have made a counterproposal for waste management, but that government officials refuse to listen. "We have a very specific proposal. We accept to manage our proportion of the garbage in the manufacturing district with a small, modern factory that we want to build as a municipality," said mayor Kostas Levantis. Government spokesman Giorgos Petalotis said the government had no intention of abandoning its plans to build the landfill, which it said would ease problems at Athens' single garbage dump. "We are the only authority that has a comprehensive plans for (greater Athens') regional development ... we will not abandon the effort that has been made and is currently being made to build this new facility," he said. But the residents are adamant. "There's no way we will back down. If they don't accept that this project cannot happen, we will be here as long as it takes," said Levantis.