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Tree Sit at Eugene Saturday Market to Protest Old-growth Sale

tree sit deployed in downtown eugene, demands the forest service buy back
trapper; cease old growth logging on public lands
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TREE SIT DEPLOYED IN DOWNTOWN EUGENE, DEMANDS THE FOREST SERVICE BUY BACK
TRAPPER; CEASE OLD GROWTH LOGGING ON PUBLIC LANDS

Activist occupies tree on the corner of Oak St and Parkst within the Eugene
Saturday Market

Eugene, September 4, 2010 Early this morning activists with Cascadia Rising
Tide deployed a tree sit within the Saturday Market in downtown Eugene. A
platform was rigged around a tree approximately 40 feet from the ground, and a
banner was hung reading "Forest Service: Give Back Trapper. Protect Our Water."
The platform is occupied by Grace Warner, who plans to remain through Saturday
to inform Eugene of the horrendous logging practices advocated by the Forest
Service, as well as threats to the drinking water supply that the Trapper timber
sale poses.

According to Vivian Rivers of Cascadia Rising Tide, "It appalls me that the
Forest Service is still logging old growth and native forests. This should
have been stopped years ago. The time is now for the community to rise up and
put an end to this atrocity once and for all." Trapper is a controversial
timber sale that has been in the works for over a decade. This 149 acre patch of
native forest (eg. never been cut) is an increasingly rare and threatened
ecosystem. It has recently gained additional attention because of a nesting
pair of spotted owls found just outside the area designated for logging. Seneca
Jones Timber Company, the purchaser of the sale, is awaiting a decision
regarding these owls by the Department of Fish and Wildlife which will most
likely allow logging to continue as planned. The sale is close to home in more
ways then one: not only is the area surrounding Trapper close to Eugene and
close to popular recreation sites, but the streams and creeks within Trapper
drain directly into the McKenzie River watershed and ultimately our faucets.
The timing of this action is advantageous; nearly 15 years ago to the day
activists established a blockade at Warner Creek, also in the Willamette
National Forest. The blockade evolved into the Cascadia Free State lasting over
a year, and the site was eventually saved. As one Rising Tider put it, "Our
message is clear: drop Trapper, stop all logging on native forest, leave our
watershed alone. Otherwise, expect resistance."

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