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Webcast Interview: Toward a Bioregional State, 30 minutes; listen, share, download

I just finished a 30 minute interview webcast via BlogTalkRadio, talking about the bioregional state. Listen for yourselves here:  http://www.blogtalkradio.com/waterfuel2007/2008/12/27/Mark-Whitaker
Toward a Bioregional State: Fresh Shoots from a Dead Tree
Toward a Bioregional State: Fresh Shoots from a Dead Tree
Sunday, December 28, 2008
Listen to a Half Hour Interview with Me Discussing the Bioregional State

I just finished a 30 minute interview webcast via BlogTalkRadio, talking about the bioregional state. Listen for yourselves here:

 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/waterfuel2007/2008/12/27/Mark-Whitaker

It was on James Robey's Radio Show for the Water Fuel Museum. The typical discussions of this program run to the material, though we stretched some minds on how important it is to think of political organizations of democracy to protect more optimal materials from political corruption that can demote them and that has demoted them in the past.

After listening to it myself, I thought it was a good discussion of some themes of the bioregional state.

You can share the link and listen to the recording online; and you can download the program from this other page:

 http://www.blogtalkradio.com/waterfuel2007

 http://biostate.blogspot.com/2008/12/listen-to-half-hour-interview-with-me.html

recent posts:

Constructive Change of our Political Institutions: Toward a Bioregional State
02.Dec.2008
summarizes four points
 http://portland.indymedia.org/en/2008/12/383033.shtml

Bioregional democracy (or the Bioregional State) is a set of electoral reforms designed to force the political process in a democracy to better represent concerns about the economy, the body, and environmental concerns (e.g., water quality), toward developmental paths that are locally prioritized and tailored to different areas for their own specific interests of sustainability and durability. This movement is variously called bioregional democracy, watershed cooperation, or bioregional representation, or one of various other similar names—all of which denote democratic control of a natural commons and local jurisdictional dominance in any economic developmental path decisions—while not removing more generalized civil rights protections of a larger national state.

Environmental sociologist and author of "Toward a Bioregional State: A Series of Letters About Political Theory and Formal Institutional Design in the Era of Sustainability". Mark is a comparative historical researcher on the politics of environmental degradation and sustainability. "Toward A Bioregional State" is his novel approach to development and to sustainability. He proposes that instead of sustainability being an issue of population scale, managerial economics, or technocratic planning, an overhaul of formal democratic institutions is required. This is because environmental degradation has more to do with the biased interactions of formal institutions and informal corruption.

 http://biostate.blogspot.com/