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9.11 investigation

Former Air Traffic Controller on 9/11 at Main Library Sunday 5/25 - Portland

If 9/11 was an "Inside Job" why hasn't any... Pilots/Architects-Engineers/Air Traffic Controllers, etc. spoken out on this?
Actually they have, and on Sunday a former Air Traffic Controller will discuss the unusual circumstances during 9/11.

Robin Hordon, former commercial pilot and FAA air traffic controller in Portland, Sunday May 25th at the (Main) Central Library

Central Library, US Bankroom (1st Floor)
801 SW 10th, Portland
Sunday, May 25th, 12:30 - 3:30 PM

Sponsored by The Portland 911 Truth Alliance
since it's at the library, no admission fee!
For further info, (503)740-6776

also listed on Indymedia calendar:
http://protest.net/pdxindymedia/index.cgi?span=event&ID=1158745&day=25&month=&year=2008&state_values=

From communitycurrency.org:

Within three hours of the attacks on the World Trade Center and Pentagon, Robin Hordon knew it was an inside job. He had been an Air Traffic Controller (ATC) for eleven years before Reagan fired him and hundreds of his colleagues after they went on strike in the eighties. Having handled in-flight emergencies and two actual hijackings in his career, he is well qualified to comment on what NORAD should have been able to achieve in its response to the near simultaneous hijacking of four domestic passenger carriers on the morning of September 11th, 2001.

"There had to be something huge to explain why those aircraft weren't shot down out of the sky. We have fighters on the ready to handle these situations twenty-four-seven. We have NORAD (North American Aerospace Defense Command) monitors monitoring our skies twenty-four-seven. We have a lot of human beings, civilian and military, who care about doing their jobs."

I spoke to Mr. Hordon one afternoon at a coffee shop in Bremerton, Washington.
"You have to understand the emotions, the duty, the job of an ATC. We are paid to watch aircraft go across the country."
It's clear that Hordon is passionate about the subject. A lot of people are. The dark questions that the attacks have left lingering in the national psyche have been recorded. 49% of New Yorkers believe that the government had something to do with 9/11. Following an interview with Charlie Sheen, a CNN poll revealed that 82% of respondents believed that there was "a government cover-up of 9/11." Jay Leno asked Bill Maher on The Tonight Show about the fact that 37% of Americans (according to Scribbs-Howard) believe that the government was involved in some way with the attacks (Maher was definitely not one of them).

As far as the "emotions, the duty, the job" of an ATC is concerned, Hordon puts it this way:
"Imagine yourself at a circus, a fair, a crowded sports event. You have in your hand your little child of five or six, you're amongst hundreds of people and you turn around and see that your child is gone. How do you feel at that moment? You feel panicked. You feel that this is the worst thing possible, so what you do is you engage. When ATCs lose an aircraft, all hell breaks loose. They flip right into motion. We take action and do not wait for other things to happen."

As a former member of the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) and PATCO (Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization), Hordon's years as an ATC are particularly relevent to 9/11 researchers.
"I was a certified ATC in Boston west-bound departures, the routing that AA11 and UA175 followed on 9/11. I know it like the back of my hand."
He even received a letter of commendation for his role in dealing with an actual hijacking. When it became clear that there hadn't been a systems failure of any kind on the morning of September 11th, Hordon was certain that something had gone terribly wrong within the upper echelons of authority. A pilot (third level air carrier) as well as an ATC, he is well versed on in-flight emergency protocol. He is also adamant that if these procedures had been followed on 9/11 not one of the hijacked planes would have reached their targets.
"I'm sorry but American 11 should have been intercepted over southwest Connecticut¬óbang, done deal."
According to Hordon, air emergencies requiring scrambles, or "flushes," from fighter jets occur 50 to 150 times a year.

homepage: homepage: http://www.robinhordon.tk/
phone: phone: (503)740-6776