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'07 French President to Runoff Election: neofascist neoliberal vs. social democracy/enviro

The results of the first round saw Nicolas Sarkozy and Ségolène Royal qualify for the second round:

Sarkozy 31.1%
Royal 25.8%

Although I know that most Americans could care less about French elections, remember as France goes, Europe will go. And there is a very close run heat between someone basically a neocon neofascist versus someone 'socialistic' though with very evil Blairite 'Third Way' sort of hypocrisies, though I think she has the better record. See below. The basics here are that France is very polarized in this election: both 'leaders' only got around 30% support from the people at large, and the second one only got around 25%--this was so despite a huge amount of voters coming to the polls: record-breaking turnout of 84.6%!

Since no candidate obtained an absolute majority, a second round between the two leading candidates--who could hardly be more different--will take place on Sunday, 6 May 2007. Sarkozy in my opinion is the neofascist "Bilderberg" candidate.
The 2007 French presidential election is held to elect a president of France for a five-year term. The first round of voting took place on Sunday, 22 April 2007. Since no candidate obtained an absolute majority, a second round between the two leading candidates will take place on Sunday, 6 May 2007.

earlier report:

Bloomberg reports that exit polls state that

Nicolas Sarkozy is leading with only 30% followed by
Ségolène Royal with only 26%,

according to polling companies Ipsos SA, Ifos, CSA and TNS-Sofres. [3]

France thankfully said 'non' to the fascist EU, preserving locally representative democracy across Europe from the massive corruption of the EU that has already been detailed here.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_presidential_election%2C_2007


earlier report:

The 2007 French presidential election is held to elect a president of France for a five-year term. The first round of voting took place on Sunday, 22 April 2007. Since no candidate obtained an absolute majority, a second round between the two leading candidates will take place on Sunday, 6 May 2007. This is the ninth presidential election of the Fifth French Republic. The first round has had a record-breaking turnout: the French Ministry of the Interior announced that 73.87% of all voters had voted by 5 p.m. on Sunday. By 5:30 pm UTC, about 84.5% of all voters had voted.

Bloomberg reports that exit polls state that Nicolas Sarkozy is leading with 30% followed by Ségolène Royal with 26%, according to polling companies Ipsos SA, Ifos, CSA and TNS-Sofres. [3]


later report:

The 2007 French presidential election is held to elect the successor of incumbent Jacques Chirac as president of France for a five-year term. The first round of voting took place on Sunday, 22 April 2007. Since no candidate obtained an absolute majority, a second round between the two leading candidates will take place on Sunday, 6 May 2007. This is the ninth presidential election of the Fifth French Republic.

The first round saw a record-breaking turnout of 84.6% — 37.6 million voters (of a total population of more than 60 million[1])[2][3]. The results of the first round saw Nicolas Sarkozy and Ségolène Royal qualify for the second round with Sarkozy getting 31.1% and Royal 25.8%. François Bayrou came third (18.55%) and Jean-Marie Le Pen fourth (10.51%) [4].

Immediately after the first round's results were official, five defeated left-wing candidates — Olivier Besancenot, José Bové, Marie-George Buffet, Arlette Laguiller and Dominique Voynet — urged their supporters to vote for Royal [5]. This was a first for Laguiller [6].

Bayrou, Le Pen, Nihous, Schivardi and de Villiers have not yet officially supported either Royal or Sarkozy.

De Villiers has refused to support a candidate in the runoff. [7]

Royal got 'only' 25.8 because the whole left demographic was split in this election with

Olivier Besancenot Rev. Communist League 1,498,835 / 4.08%

Marie-George Buffet Parti communiste français 707,327 /1.93%

José Bové Alter-globalization activist 483,076 1.32%
[Yes, ol Bove ran!]

Dominique Voynet The Greens (Les Verts) 576,758 1.57%

Arlette Laguiller Workers' Struggle 488,119 / 1.33%


in short:

On the national level, Nicolas Sarkozy obtained 31.11% and Ségolène Royal 25.83% — while in 2002, Jacques Chirac had obtained 19.88%, and Lionel Jospin 16.8%.

The right demographic was split in many ways as well:

***The right-of-center François Bayrou obtained 18.55% this time, tripling his 2002 result (6.84%).***

National Front (FN) candidate, Jean-Marie Le Pen, made only 10.51%, compared to his stunning 16.86% finish in 2002.

Along with the April-May shift to the far right made by Sarkozy, this has led many commentators to allege that traditional voters of the FN had been tempted by Sarkozy.

On a global scale:

left-wing reached 36% of the votes,
against 18.5% for the ill-defined "center",
33% for the right wing and 10.6% for the far right.

France is VERY POLARIZED RIGHT NOW, when its future leaders can only get maybe around 1/3 support of all voters.

LE CHOIX EST, MAINTENANT:

France may have its first woman President, a socialist (who however appeals to 'law and order', though she was an environmental minister by 'trade' before. Read about her at the link. She kind of a 'crypto-green' in other words. Green-left. READ ABOUT HER:

She is known for her admiration for some "Third Way" policies, for her controversial insistence on "law and order" issues and for her support of devolution and participatory democracy. ...

During her tenure as Minister for the Environment, 1992-1993, Royal campaigned actively and successfully for the Law on the treatment and recycling of refuse (La loi sur le traitement et le recyclage des déchets), the Law to preserve the countryside (La loi sur la reconquête des paysages), a Save our countrysides, savor their products campaign to provide proper labelling for the products of 100 local areas (opération «Sauvons nos paysages, savourons leurs produits»), and the Law against noise pollution (La loi de lutte contre le bruit). She provided compensation for people adversely affected by airport noise.[14]

Education

During her tenure as Minister-delegate for the Family, Children, and the Handicapped, 2000-2002,[14] Royal was active in the re-launch of the Priority Education Zones program (ZEP / zone d'éducation prioritaire), the creation of a government student lunch program, the implementation of language instruction as a priority in primary schools, the creation of a national home-tutoring program, Heures de Soutien Scolaire,[15] and the creation of programs for parental involvement in schools, "la Semaine des parents à l'école", and national campaigns for the elections of parent-representatives. She also campaigned for the creation of local education and citizenship education contracts, the "Initiatives citoyennes" program for teaching children how to live together, the law on Defense of children's rights and campaign against violence in the schools (Loi de juin 1998 relative à la prévention et à la répression des infractions sexuelles ainsi qu'à la protection des mineurs), the Campaign against "hazing" rituals in higher education (Loi de juin 1998 contre le bizutage), the Campaign against violence and racketeering which included implementation of the "SOS Violence" telephone number, and the implementation of mandatory civics instruction in secondary schools. In January 2006 she criticized secondary school teachers who give private lessons outside of school hours, saying that they should spend more time in school.

...

Royal has supported the Law against child pornography, the creation of the association "Childhood and the Media" ("Enfance et média") against violence in the media, the creation of the "Plan Handiscole" for the education of handicapped children and adolescents and their integration into life at school, programs for mass and individual transportation, and the creation of the program Tourism and the Handicapped ("Tourisme et handicap").[20]

Women's issues also play an important role in Royal's campaign. A French woman, for example, currently earns only 80 percent of a male counterpart's salary, Ms. magazine reports. When she accepted her nomination as the Socialist presidential candidate, Royal said, "There is a strong correlation between the status of a woman and the state of justice or injustice in a country." [21]

In 2000 Royal, as the then Minister of the Family and Children spoke out against anti-gay bullying in schools, saying, "School must be a place of tolerance, of welcome. Too many young people face teasing, social exclusion because of their sexual orientation... Some consider drugs, suicide attempts. It is time to stand up to this hostility shown towards homosexuality." She later introduced an educational packet in high schools and colleges called "The Happiness of Loving", designed particularly for teachers and nurses. It comprises a video, educational information and printed copies for students which address the different issues of homosexuality and homophobia. It includes information on the Civil Partnership scheme, the situation of homosexuals and the discrimination they face abroad. Royal commented further on the issue later that year: "It is necessary, in my opinion, to step up against homophobia, to recognise and respect each other, with our differences".

In a June 2006 interview with LGBT publication Têtu, Royal said "opening up marriage to same-sex couples is needed in the name of equality, visibility and respect" and said that if her party formed the next government, she would introduce a bill to legalize same-sex marriage and adoption.[

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/S%C3%A9gol%C3%A8ne_Royal

Or la belle France will have a policeman in charge of cracking down everything in sight. READ ABOUT HIM:
A divisive figure in France, he is known for his controversial tough stance on law and order, and his admiration for the Neoliberalism [psychopathic] model. Many critics have accused him of being an authoritarian demagogue, ready to trade away civil liberties for political gains.

Towards the end of his first term as Minister of the Interior, in 2004, Sarkozy was the most popular conservative politician in France, according to polls conducted at the beginning of 2004. His "tough on crime" policies, which included increasing the police presence on the streets and introducing monthly crime performance ratings, were popular with many. However, he was criticised for putting forward legislation which can be questioned as an infringement on civil rights, and adversely affected disadvantaged sections of the population.

Sarkozy has sought to ease the sometimes tense relationships between the general French population and the Muslim community. Unlike the Catholic Church in France with their official leaders or the Protestants with their umbrella organizations to speak for them, Islam, with its lack of structure did not have any group that could legitimately deal with the French government on their behalf. Sarkozy felt that the foundation of such an organisation was desirable. He supported the foundation in May 2003 of the private non-profit Conseil français du culte musulman ("French Council of Muslim Worship"), an organisation meant to be representative of French Muslims.[6] In addition, Sarkozy has suggested amending the 1905 law on the separation of Church and State...

MR. PRIVATIZE:

During his short appointment as Minister of Finance, Sarkozy was responsible for introducing a number of policies. The degree to which this reflected libéralisme (a hands-off approach to running the economy, otherise known as sell of expensive government properties corruptly to your private corporate favorites, and then cover for them and call it "privatization") or more traditional French state dirigisme (intervention) is controversial.

* In September 2004, Sarkozy oversaw the reduction of the government ownership stake in France Télécom from 50.4% to 41%.[8]
* Sarkozy backed a partial nationalisation of the engineering company Alstom decided by his predecessor when the company was exposed to bankruptcy in 2003.[9]

Sarkozy as Minister of the Interior with American Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice, after their bilateral meeting in Washington D.C.

the civil unrest in autumn 2005 put law enforcement in the spotlight again. Nicolas Sarkozy made a number of tough declarations. He was accused of having provoked the unrest by calling young delinquents from housing projects "racaille" (chavs) in Argenteuil, near Paris. After the accidental death of two kids, which sparked the riots, Sarkozy first blamed it on "hoodlums" and gangsters. He was then criticized by many on the left wing, and including by a member of his own government,...

After the rioting, he made a number of announcements on future policy: selection of immigrants, better tracking of immigrants,...

Sarkozy currently is the president of UMP, the French conservative party, elected with 85% of the vote. During his presidency, the number of members has significantly increased. In 2005, he supported a "yes" vote in the French referendum on the European Constitution. [SCREW HIM!]

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nicolas_Sarkozy

Look at that turnout: almost 85% of eligible voters came out.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_presidential_election%2C_2007

COULD THESE TWO RUNOFF CANDIDATES BE MORE DIFFERENT? I DON'T SEE HOW.

Sarkozy will just privatized and destroy France entirely, turning it into a police state and polarizing it more. Sarkozy in my opinion is the neofascist "Bilderberg" candidate.

Royal will at least leave France alone, and conduct far more integrative social policies. It will be a not so huge trouncing of the neofascists for her to win (given how polarized France is), though this seems to be the direction of France after the 'non' against the totalitarian EU several years ago. I would trust more people to vote against Sarkozy's fascism in fear of him, than vote for Royal directly, which should play out for her.