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0418 Get This

Summary of the KBOO am news for Wednesday, April 18th, 2007.
Get This 0418
Get This 0418
04/18/07 Get This
sui generis

1. The Oregon House passed a bill that gives Gays and Lesbians all the benefits of marriage (Except actual marriage, you see... Because that would cause hetero marriages to come unraveled.) and protections against discrimination under two landmark bills. Now it's on to the Senate and the Governor's desk. After that, the road divides: Soccer camp or divorce court. (Historical note: America's first township, 400 years ago, Jamestown was almost exclusively male. And Christian. Inevitably, 'partnerships' formed. So what they did about this, was the church "consecrated" quite a few of these same sex marriages. So next time some bigot says gay marriage is anti-America and unchristian, well... )
2. The Road To Salem Is Paved With Good - And Not-so-Good Intentions: Hundreds of people went to the State capital to tell the Legislature what they can do with Measure 37 (As with things like fisting and shrimping, some like it some don't... ). My suggestion: If you like the idea of boundless development, by all means, move to Houston...
3. Oregon's own discount emporium, Bi-Mart is suing Anaconda-Deer Lodge County (What are the chances that this Montana county was originally called 'Deer Lodge,' until a mining company underwrote some piss ante football field... ?) and Atlantic Richfield. One of Bi-Mart's contractor's trucks fell through a hole on the building site that contained drums of toxic metals left over from copper mining (That word 'Anaconda' should have been the first sign something was wrong with the deal... )
4. The Washington House approved a bill to create a 'Wild Sky Wilderness' north of Seattle. It's been a few years in the making, but once you sweep out the Republicans and other detritus, you can actually do some good things with government, instead of god on your side...
5. Case in point: Governor Christine Gregoire is signing a few bills today: A law phasing out some fireproofing chemicals commonly - until today - found in electronics and upholstery. Another law that would protect journalists from going to jail for protecting their sources. And the icing on the cake? A 'Rainy Day' fund. Remember the 'Good Old Days' when Oregon was the nation's pre-eminent progressive state?... No?... .Well, it has been a while.
6. Cho Seung-hui, the Virginia Tech shooter - we hardly knew ya... But one thing we know, is that you and your family were devout Christians. Before the media got more of the sordid details, this little info-tidbit was readily available...
7. A Stanford University environmental engineering professor has publish new findings that show that ethanol is worse for the body and the air than good old gas. (Bad news for the genetic engineers at ADM who have been hard at work cranking out new strains of ethanol-ready corn... )
8. Researchers at Harvard have learned - don't ask me how - that marijuana is good for your lungs... A hell of a lot better than ethanol, at the very least...
9. Wall Street is right up there at the top of the campaign donors list: Guess which campaigns...
10. The government has closed college databases to student loan companies due to massive pillaging, plundering and sacking of these sprawling cities of lucrative information.
11. Gazillionaire George Soros is accusing the Bush administration of pandering to Israel and the American Israel Public Affairs Committee. Soros - who, by the way, is Jewish - says AIPAC is intervening in debates over Iran, the nearly successful appointment of John Bolton as US ambassador to the UN and the administration's enthusiastic swan dive into Middle Eastern politics.
12. Defense Secretary, Robert Gates says that debate over US withdrawal from Iraq is "helpful"; withdrawal itself is not on the table - at least not to his particular department where war is business and business is good. (Until the whole US economy tanks, at which point busyness is neither good nor bad - just gone... )
13. So far today, the death toll for bombs in Baghdad is 178 and counting... .
14. Aside from the daily death toll, Iraq has other problems aplenty which administration sophistry continues to ignore, discount or otherwise remain unaware of entirely. Example: 80 percent of Iraqis lack sanitation; 70 percent lack potable water and 60 percent have no access to the public food distribution system. Don't even ask about the electricity...
15. The Us continues to ignore the horrendous Iraqi refugee crisis it has created. Originally, America agreed to open its fleshy arms to 7 thousand refugees - that's out of numbers that top 1.9 million. So far, we have embraced just 400. (And those few will probably end up on 'No-Fly-List' or shuffled off to detention facilities for the crime of having Iraqi names... )
16. The commander of an Electronic Attack Squadron stationed with the USS Dwight D. Eisenhower in the Persian Gulf has been "relieved of duty" for unspecified reasons. (Refusing to launch air strikes on Iran, would be my first guess... .)
17. In Pakistan, protestors are gathered around the Supreme Court today to oppose President General Pervez Musharraf's suspension of that nation's Chief Justice. This situation has been heating up fast and it is yet another geopolitical headache for the Bush administration, which had been planning on using Pakistan as it's base for the continual attacks on Afghanistan and the upcoming assault on Iran. (Oh, to be in Peshawar when the poppies are in bloom... )
18. The dollar continues to fall against the pound on world markets. The pound sterling broke through the $2 dollar level yesterday.
19. Mexican gunmen snatched a crime reporter who strayed a bit to close to the border area where you can be one of three things: 1. A Narco-Trafficker; 2. A maquilladora slave-laborer; 3. Dead.
20. Even the European Union thinks America's Good-Neighbor Fence is a ridiculous - not to mention cruel - idea.
21. In Nigeria, opposition candidates want the upcoming election postponed. The voting hasn't even started in earnest yet, and already cracks are appearing in the foundation of Truth, Decency and The Nigerian Way... .
22. In France, Segolene Royal and Nicolas Sarkozy are on the Woo Trail.
23. The Mayor of Nagasaki was killed by Yakuza.
24. And America and Australia are going to trade refugees (Like trading CO2 emissions, or baseball cards... Take your pick... )

Thanks for the News 18.Apr.2007 14:20

Joe Anybody

Thanks sui generis

Nice to meet you the other day at "The River Runs Red With Blood From Oil"

Olaf Van Cleef give a incredible party in Pndicherry : Diamond Dinner 21.Apr.2007 18:21

sanjay Modi sanjay@wanadoo.be

The purist may look askance but Olaf Van Cleef does not really care. The carping critic may wonder what's going on and the trained painter may cringe at the veritable mixing of artistic metaphors but the delightful outcome is precisely what Van Cleef is all about. Fundamentally, a jeweller with a passion for the chic in quite the classical sense; then a brand ambassador for Cartier, Paris; third ? and much later in life ? a painter expressing the turbulence of his soul in an emotional outburst of complex colours; Van Cleef in his fourth incarnation is a jeweller and painter morphed into one with his crystal-studded performance, the `Bejewelled Fireflies', which opened in Kolkata's Galerie La Mere recently, under the aegis of the Sri Aurobindo Institute of Culture.

Having overcome the impact of the initial encounter with what may be called a typically Olaf-ish genre of art, one cannot but take a second look and a closer third look into the vivacious world of sparking colours that contains such inexplicable strains of black and grey.

Van Cleef is pouring out his turmoil-filled soul into his external world, which he has immersed in the most striking hues: the turquoise blue against the magenta or the bright yellow or the pale green against the ink blue and the golden brown. The added dimension in this kaleidoscope comes in the shape of tiny bits of Austrian crystals embedded into the art or, in possibly the lighter moments, minuscule strips of chocolate wrapping pasted daintily alongside strips of delicately drawn bamboo. The French expert Ghislain Mollet-Vieville had suggested that Van Cleef bring his jewel craft into his paintings and even as the `classical Olaf' was hesitating, "friend David quietly poured some diamond chips on his work. The effect was stunning". Van Cleef had realised that the jewelled touch would be well worth the effort.

Into this luminescent world enters the black: in herringbones, through serpentines, crosses or even via the deformed Swastika. Many in Van Cleef's family have fallen prey to the Swastika's evil regime but the symbol in the Indian context brings solace to the soul of the painter who has never ceased to grieve for the death of his dearly beloved on the one hand and for the death of simplicity or innocence in the `cultured' world around him.

It is similar to the solace that the City of Joy, Kolkata, provides him with ? drawing him for biannual visits, inspiring his art, enlightening his mind "with the sheer depth of its culture" and "invigorating" him with the "throbbing of its heartbeat", which Van Cleef can feel even in distant Paris. There he paints through the night, like a man possessed, placing his colours in mosaics or in a labyrinth of lines wending their way around circles, triangles, rectangles.

"Kolkata peeps out from unexpected corners" of his art: a Krishna-Gopi sequence in a possibly Rajasthan painting with a miniature Howrah Bridge conspicuous through the archway of a palace or the Royal Bengal Tiger placing itself majestically in the midst of another.

What sets the Bejewelled Fireflies apart from his earlier works is the deliberate care with which "every emotion has been made distinct;" every dot that Van Cleef "places on paper is a separate identity, conveying something significant" and his paintings are replete with them. They are striking because of the sheer contrast of the white on black ? the artist using his "half a micron felt tipped pen under magnifying glasses to ensure that no dot touches another".

Whether the overall picture is one riot of colour or a mass of confusion reaching out for a world of comprehension possibly depends on the viewer but it does not fail to raise questions. Save a few paintings that are clearly self portrayals: a bemused young Van Cleef contemplating his beloved grandmother or a young French boy seeing an elephant for the first time in India and then envisioning a grand entry into this land of palaces and fountains as a caparisoned pachyderm in the company of two younger members of the species, which convey wonderment, others are poignant even in their splendour. There are the monarchs, the fish, the weeping women by the well, the batiked fabric or the timeless clock. Most are fenced by spotted lines of black and white; sorrow and joy.

Elephants are very central to Van Cleef's current series: the dancing twins with their crystal-studded cloaks or the majestic shape framed against the equilateral arch of a maharaja's abode. It is not just the physical presence of the jewels that give the paintings an embossed look; it is the Moulins Papier d'Arches paper, "pure cotton, produced by a company of 1492 vintage". Van Cleef has found in this a material that has a mind of its own: "making a very special contribution to the painting as it soaks up the colours". For some artists it may have been nightmarish but Van Cleef has found a way of making the paper cooperate with his fingers, which choose to do a bit of calligraphy now, or again some delicate stone placement or even engaging in some careless dabbing of paint on paper, and then, when the fingers want to shock deliberately they just pick up chocolate paper, snipping it into infinitesimal bits to be scattered over the easel; carefully carelessly. Van Cleef does not know what he will paint; his soul takes over as he devotes about a 100 hours to each work.

Bejewelled Fireflies is more than special because it is a tribute to the city that Van Cleef loves more than any other: its spirit encompassed by the Howrah Bridge that connects everyone and everything "without any sense of stratification; like a soul that is set free".

It is this sense of freedom that Van Cleef is seeking ; freedom from the complexities of his mind that snatch his sleep over endless nights; freedom to lose himself in his world of jewels and gems; and in the colour of crushed lapis lazuli or simple sindur that adorns the forehead of the Indian woman.

http://www.olafvancleef.org
Hotel La Promenade Pondicherry. India

Olaf Van Cleef give a incredible party in Pndicherry : Diamond Dinner 21.Apr.2007 18:21

sanjay Modi sanjay@wanadoo.be

The purist may look askance but Olaf Van Cleef does not really care. The carping critic may wonder what's going on and the trained painter may cringe at the veritable mixing of artistic metaphors but the delightful outcome is precisely what Van Cleef is all about. Fundamentally, a jeweller with a passion for the chic in quite the classical sense; then a brand ambassador for Cartier, Paris; third ? and much later in life ? a painter expressing the turbulence of his soul in an emotional outburst of complex colours; Van Cleef in his fourth incarnation is a jeweller and painter morphed into one with his crystal-studded performance, the `Bejewelled Fireflies', which opened in Kolkata's Galerie La Mere recently, under the aegis of the Sri Aurobindo Institute of Culture.

Having overcome the impact of the initial encounter with what may be called a typically Olaf-ish genre of art, one cannot but take a second look and a closer third look into the vivacious world of sparking colours that contains such inexplicable strains of black and grey.

Van Cleef is pouring out his turmoil-filled soul into his external world, which he has immersed in the most striking hues: the turquoise blue against the magenta or the bright yellow or the pale green against the ink blue and the golden brown. The added dimension in this kaleidoscope comes in the shape of tiny bits of Austrian crystals embedded into the art or, in possibly the lighter moments, minuscule strips of chocolate wrapping pasted daintily alongside strips of delicately drawn bamboo. The French expert Ghislain Mollet-Vieville had suggested that Van Cleef bring his jewel craft into his paintings and even as the `classical Olaf' was hesitating, "friend David quietly poured some diamond chips on his work. The effect was stunning". Van Cleef had realised that the jewelled touch would be well worth the effort.

Into this luminescent world enters the black: in herringbones, through serpentines, crosses or even via the deformed Swastika. Many in Van Cleef's family have fallen prey to the Swastika's evil regime but the symbol in the Indian context brings solace to the soul of the painter who has never ceased to grieve for the death of his dearly beloved on the one hand and for the death of simplicity or innocence in the `cultured' world around him.

It is similar to the solace that the City of Joy, Kolkata, provides him with ? drawing him for biannual visits, inspiring his art, enlightening his mind "with the sheer depth of its culture" and "invigorating" him with the "throbbing of its heartbeat", which Van Cleef can feel even in distant Paris. There he paints through the night, like a man possessed, placing his colours in mosaics or in a labyrinth of lines wending their way around circles, triangles, rectangles.

"Kolkata peeps out from unexpected corners" of his art: a Krishna-Gopi sequence in a possibly Rajasthan painting with a miniature Howrah Bridge conspicuous through the archway of a palace or the Royal Bengal Tiger placing itself majestically in the midst of another.

What sets the Bejewelled Fireflies apart from his earlier works is the deliberate care with which "every emotion has been made distinct;" every dot that Van Cleef "places on paper is a separate identity, conveying something significant" and his paintings are replete with them. They are striking because of the sheer contrast of the white on black ? the artist using his "half a micron felt tipped pen under magnifying glasses to ensure that no dot touches another".

Whether the overall picture is one riot of colour or a mass of confusion reaching out for a world of comprehension possibly depends on the viewer but it does not fail to raise questions. Save a few paintings that are clearly self portrayals: a bemused young Van Cleef contemplating his beloved grandmother or a young French boy seeing an elephant for the first time in India and then envisioning a grand entry into this land of palaces and fountains as a caparisoned pachyderm in the company of two younger members of the species, which convey wonderment, others are poignant even in their splendour. There are the monarchs, the fish, the weeping women by the well, the batiked fabric or the timeless clock. Most are fenced by spotted lines of black and white; sorrow and joy.

Elephants are very central to Van Cleef's current series: the dancing twins with their crystal-studded cloaks or the majestic shape framed against the equilateral arch of a maharaja's abode. It is not just the physical presence of the jewels that give the paintings an embossed look; it is the Moulins Papier d'Arches paper, "pure cotton, produced by a company of 1492 vintage". Van Cleef has found in this a material that has a mind of its own: "making a very special contribution to the painting as it soaks up the colours". For some artists it may have been nightmarish but Van Cleef has found a way of making the paper cooperate with his fingers, which choose to do a bit of calligraphy now, or again some delicate stone placement or even engaging in some careless dabbing of paint on paper, and then, when the fingers want to shock deliberately they just pick up chocolate paper, snipping it into infinitesimal bits to be scattered over the easel; carefully carelessly. Van Cleef does not know what he will paint; his soul takes over as he devotes about a 100 hours to each work.

Bejewelled Fireflies is more than special because it is a tribute to the city that Van Cleef loves more than any other: its spirit encompassed by the Howrah Bridge that connects everyone and everything "without any sense of stratification; like a soul that is set free".

It is this sense of freedom that Van Cleef is seeking ; freedom from the complexities of his mind that snatch his sleep over endless nights; freedom to lose himself in his world of jewels and gems; and in the colour of crushed lapis lazuli or simple sindur that adorns the forehead of the Indian woman.

http://www.olafvancleef.org
Hotel La Promenade Pondicherry. India