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Violent Cops REWARDED with FREE COFFEE: James P. Chasse Jr.

Portland Police Union fosters and reinforces an US vs. THEM mentality that condones police on citizen violence. The Police Bureau itself silently accepts the mocking tone of the police union and its insensitivity to the families of innocent victims. My question is; "are these cops really untouchable?" Why does Portland, a progressive city, living in the 2006...the 21st century for goodness sakes...allow the police to practice violence against minorities. When I read these reports and look at the history of Portland I am reminded of the deep south of the 1940's. The city is populated with a silent majority that condones by remaining silent the lynching of minorities. The city quietly accepts the slander and innuendo of minorities by the secret society. The population permits the secret society to behave violently in public and they are unrestrained by either legal or political means. The secret society mocks the public because they know that they own the public. Portland's greatest problem is that it is living in the past; it is retarded by its unrelenting deferance to its own backward-ass police force.
Portland Police Union fosters and reinforces an US vs. THEM mentality that condones police on citizen violence. The Police Bureau itself silently accepts the mocking tone of the police union and its insensitivity to the families of innocent victims. My question is; "are these cops really untouchable?" Why does Portland, a progressive city, living in the 2006...the 21st century for goodness sakes...allow the police to practice violence against minorities. When I read these reports and look at the history of Portland I am reminded of the deep south of the 1940's. The city is populated with a silent majority that condones by remaining silent the lynching of minorities. The city quietly accepts the slander and innuendo of minorities by the secret society. The population permits the secret society to behave violently in public and they are unrestrained by either legal or political means. The secret society mocks the public because they know that they own the public. This largely over-looked report in the Portland Mercury, November 6, 2006 demonstrates a callous disregard for the public that hasn't been seen since the days of "Smoke 'em don't Choke 'em". For those who missed it, last Tuesday's Portland Tribune featured a scoop listing the Portland Police Bureau's most frequent users of force. Well, this week those officers named in the article will receive $10 Starbucks gift certificates from Robert King, head of the Portland Police Association. King said that thanks to the recent controversial in-custody death of James Chasse Jr., as well as a report on racial profiling and now the Tribune article, his union members have been victims of a "media frenzy" that unfairly portrays them. "I want them to keep their chins up and keep taking care of business," he said. "It's an honorable profession and the people need us, no matter what they read in the paper or hear politicians say." http://www.portlandtribune.com/news/story.php?story_id=116285955475462700 What is the public to conclude from the fact that Head of the Police Union Robert King only rewarded Portland's top 10 most violent police officers? Hasn't the entire police force suffered from this "media frenzy"? Don't they all deserve coffee? Perhaps Mr. King is chiding the other officers for doing their jobs without resorting to violence and racial profiling? Or, perhaps he wanted to reward Officer Humphries alone but that would be too blatant so he simply rewarded all top ten violent officers for "taking care of business". In fact, this honor for the top 10 violent cops is a sick joke that mocks the life and brutal death of James P. Chasse Jr., it mocks his family, and it mocks the public public as a whole. The act of presenting this "Coffee Award" says publicly; "we're violent and there is nothing the public can do about it; we're above the law itself because we are the law". To fully appreciate the joke the public must appreciate the context. Following the violent beating of James P. Chasse Jr. the officer credited with inflicting the greatest damage; Officer Humphries, is photographed returning, with coffee cup in hand, to the scene where Mr. Chasse lay on the ground dying. In summary; Officer Humphries beat a man unconscious and then casually went for a cup of coffee while his victim lay hog-tied and dying. Here's the photograph so everyone can appreciate the great humor of this joke: http://www.mentalhealthportland.org/Marquez.htm Robert King, head of the police union, granted the coffee award award to "keep their chins up..." to be proud of the job that these men do and he picked a very public means for doing so. Clearly, Mr. King feels that Officer Humphries is a shining example for all the police force and he chose a fitting reward to emphasize a public image of Officer Humphries while mocking the public. The "coffee award" draws from and reinforces a public image of Officer Humphries that depicts a Police Officer as cool and casual following a brutal beating; this is the shining example that Mr. King reinforces with his coffee awards. It is reminiscent of the Godfather; "Leave the gun, take the canollies". Callous and cool. This is not the first inside police bureau/police union joke in history. It is not the first insensitive joke that mocks the public, family, and public. Portland's Police have a long history of insular behavior that demonstrates an US vs. THEM mentality. The men in blue against all the scumbags. It is a mental emotional process that desensitizes police and further separates them from civil society. It is a process that threatens the public because it allows the police to become "free-agents" accountable only to their fellow officers rather than the public or political authorities to which they are accountable. My question is; "are these cops really untouchable?" Why does Portland, a progressive city, living in the 2006...the 21st century for goodness sakes...allow the police to practice violence against minorities. When I read these reports and look at the history of Portland I am reminded of the deep south of the 1940's. The city is populated with a silent majority that condones by remaining silent the lynching of minorities. The city quietly accepts the slander and innuendo of minorities by the secret society. The population permits the secret society to behave violently in public and they are unrestrained by either legal or political means. The secret society mocks the public because they know that they own the public. the Old South silently condoning violence against minority populations. Starbucks has made no public comment to the news that their product is used to reward and reinforce police violence. The end: Below are other historical links relating good clean police fun which demonstrate the insular behavior that separates police from the public. Along the way some cop somewhere believe these acts were good ideas and the police union defended them. Below are other shining examples of police conduct which were supported and condoned by the police union when police officers were "taking care of business". Historically, the police union has defended all of these officer because that is simply what the police union is supposed to do. Defend, protect, and advocate on behalf of officers. Consider the following incident from 1985: On the very day Stevenson was buried, officers Richard Montee and Paul Wickersham sold as many as 30 T-shirts in the East Precinct parking lot, depicting a smoking gun and emblazoned with the slogan "Don't Choke 'Em, Smoke 'Em," indicating that they--and the officers who bought the shirts--believed Pantley and Barbour hadn't erred in killing Stevenson but had erred only in their method. http://www.wweek.com/html/25-1985.html You're two young police officers working the Northeast precinct. Between radio calls, duty can get pretty dull. So what do you do? Toss four dead opossums in front of a black-owned Northeast Portland restaurant and touch off one of the most contentious disputes between the police force, the city and the public in years. http://www.wweek.com/html/25-1981.html