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Pit Bull information

Here is a good site for learning about pit bulls.
On the ASPCA site this morning, I found this web page which is full of information about pit bulls. Check out the "are you responsible" section for sure. And check out the pictures!

 http://www.badrap.org/conference2006/index.htm
very good 06.Oct.2006 14:30

site

Check out the "pros and cons" page. Headlining one section is "Dod on dog aggression is common", further down another heading reads {The golden rule of pitbull management says "Never trust a pitbull not to fight"}. Another admonition reads, Leaving pitbulls alone together unattended, no matter how much they "love each other" is inviting disaster.

I was unaware that pitbulls have a special accessory, called a break stick, used for prying open clamped down jaws. My hands always seemed to suffice with my "allegedly" just as dangerous 110 lb. Golden retriever. In fairness, I would imagine this accessory is used with other breeds being attack trained as well.

From the Monster Myths page, One heading reads; Dont pitbulls have to be trained to fight? (Obviously) No, just as we have breeds like the Jack Russel terrier that was selectively bred to do battle with Badgers, Foxes and other animals, the bull breeds have been selectively bred to fight other dogs.

BTW, an earlier poster claimed even the CDC had no data on the potential dangers of pitbulls, I guess they missed this.

 http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/00047723.htm

Scroll down to table 1.

More great websites 06.Oct.2006 14:56

mh

Thanks Olwen, I hadn't seen that site. And I also appreciate you pointing out the section about being a responsible owner.

When we first adopted Petey, I did a lot of research on the breed, and after reading spots like that, I understood that I had the duty to not only be a responsible pet owner (as I always have been), but I had the extra duty to be especially so.

Not because I feared that my dog was an armed weapon that could snap at any time as some people think (if you saw Petey, you'd have to laugh at that). But as Cat mentioned in another post, because if anything at all happened, Petey would be blamed, even if he wasn't at fault.

We, as pit bull owners, owe the breed the duty to be extra vigilant simply because we have to battle bad press and near-hysterical pre-conceived notions. And every pit bull owner I personally know, understands that.

Here's some more good websites:

 http://www.forpitssake.org/
 http://www.happypitbull.com/
 http://www.workingpitbull.com/ (This is Diane Jessup's site)
 http://www.pitbullpress.com/
 http://www.realpitbull.com/

Research 101 06.Oct.2006 19:49

mh

You know, you can prove any point you want to, if you resort to selective reading.

First of all, the earlier poster - me - DID NOT claim "the CDC had no data on the potential dangers of pitbulls."

What I did say, and what the very report you reference in your link ALSO says is this, and I quote from your cited report:

======
"The findings in this report are subject to at least two limitations.

First, because death-certificate data were not available, the two sources used for case finding in 1995-1996 probably underestimated the number of DBRFs and may represent only 74% of actual cases.

Second, to definitively determine whether certain breeds are disproportionately represented, breed-specific fatality rates should be calculated. The numerator for such rates requires complete ascertainment of deaths and an accurate determination of the breed involved, and the denominator requires reliable breed-specific population data (i.e., number of deaths involving a given breed divided by number of dogs of that breed). However, such denominator data are not available, and official registration or licensing data cannot be used because owners of certain breeds may be less likely than those owning other breeds to register or license their animals.

Three categories of strategies can be considered for preventing dog bites:

1. Owner and public education. Dog owners, through proper selection, socialization, training, care, and treatment of a dog, can reduce the likelihood of owning a dog that will eventually bite. Male and unspayed/unneutered dogs are more likely to bite than are female and spayed/neutered dogs. Educational and prevention efforts should be directed at parents and children. Veterinarians and pediatricians should address strategies for bite prevention, including the need for appropriate supervision of children. Other strategies include dissemination of information on preventing bites (see box(Table_B1)), school-based educational programs on bite prevention and canine behavior, and educational programs regarding responsible dog selection, ownership, and training.

2. Animal control at the community level. Animal-control programs should be supported, and laws for regulating dangerous or vicious dogs should be promulgated and enforced vigorously. For example, in this report, 30% of DBRFs resulted from groups of owned dogs that were free roaming off the owner's property. Some of these deaths might have been prevented through more stringent animal-control laws and enforcement. Although some breeds were disproportionately represented in the fatal attacks described in this report, the representation of breeds changes over time (Table_1). As a result, targeting a specific breed may be unproductive; a more effective approach may be to target chronically irresponsible dog owners.

3. Bite reporting. Evaluation of prevention efforts requires improved surveillance for dog bites. Dog bites should be reported as required by local or state ordinances, and reports of such incidents should include information about the circumstances of the bite; ownership, breed, sex, age, spay/neuter status, and history of prior aggression of the animal; and the nature of restraint before the bite incident."
=====

OK. Did you catch that? Too much mumbo jumbo for you? I'll boil it down:

* To definitively determine whether certain breeds are disproportionately represented, breed-specific fatality rates should be calculated. The denominator of this rate requires reliable breed-specific population data (i.e., number of deaths involving a given breed divided by number of dogs of that breed). However, such denominator data are not available.

* Although some breeds were disproportionately represented in the fatal attacks described in this report, the representation of breeds changes over time (See your Table_1).

In still simpler words, AS I SAID BEFORE, there is no way to really tell if pit bulls cause more fatalities than any other breed. And even if we use the imperfect data we have, the "most deadly" breed changes over time.

THEREFORE, the CDC does not recommend breed-specific legislation!!!!!

Seriously, if you're going to cite "proof," is it too much to read the whole thing?

if u love them as much i do 05.Nov.2006 13:16

me aman_dieslike_abutterfly@hotmail.com

 link to pic6.piczo.com



if u love them as much i do. ull comment. how do u see a killer in her

great pitbull site 19.Dec.2006 06:08

Miki Asenoc

I found today new pitbull related site Pitbull DOg Site