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Obrador's "parallel government" and economic boycott to oppose Calderon coup for 6 years

"This is the firm and honorable response to those who have converted our political institutions into a grotesque farce," Lopez Obrador said.

1.2 million people came to the Zocalo for a "National Democratic Convention" Saturday afternoon, where they voted to swear in Obrador as the "legitimate president" on 20th of November--eleven days BEFORE Calderon is "officially" implanted on December 1, 2006. This is a symbolic "parallel" government, complete with its own Cabinet, to spend the next six years opposing the rule of Mr Calderon. Convention delegates will boycott major national/international companies that they say supported Calderon, toward formation of a "Progressive Front".

On Friday, Fox actually moved Mexican Independence Day celebrations out of the Mexican capital--amid security fears since vote fraud protesters still occupied the Zocalo. There for seven weeks, they agreed to disband the tent city for good ahead of Saturday's parade where outgoing PRI Party's President Fox reviewed thousands of military personnel in the Zocalo--the very next day. Then, only hours later, Obrador was back in the Zocalo for the 1.2 million vote, done by a show of hands in the packed Zocalo square to form the parallel government and long term boycott. This massive parallel government meeting shows the huge illegitimacy of Calderon; this vote took place just hours after Fox conducted a massive military parade celebrating supposed "Mexican democratic independence"...
Obrador, Parallel President, starts 6 year political economic boycott campaign
Obrador, Parallel President, starts 6 year political economic boycott campaign
The
The "National Democratic Convention" for the parallel government, 1.2 mil...
...held only hours after massive military parade in same place by Fox & Co.
...held only hours after massive military parade in same place by Fox & Co.
One supporter, Lidia Alvarado, said: "It is going to be very rough for Calderon. Wherever he goes, we'll be there to remind him he became president through fraud."

Antonio Romano Hernandez, a 56-year-old baker from Mexico City, said: "This convention is the most palpable proof of how the people of Mexico feel."

The well-known newspaper journalist and political analyst Pablo Gonzalez Casanova...accuses Washington of openly supporting a massive electoral fraud perpetrated by the government and party of President Vicente Fox, "the former chief of Coca Cola".

Manuel Mejido, in El Sol de Mexico, is uneasy...and calls on the ruling sectors in Mexico "to take seriously" many of the issues raised by Obrador "because they represent the poor, the majority and marginalised bulk of society. Sixty eight million hungry Mexicans."

Fox and Calderon, a member of Fox's conservative National Action Party, reviewed the Saturday military parade as about 200 supporters of Lopez Obrador waved posters that read "Fox, traitor to democracy".

But just minutes after the parade left the Zocalo, leftists moved back in, carrying the large yellow flags of the Democratic Revolution Party and preparing for the massive open-air meeting.


1.

Mexico Election Saga Intensifies
Posted on Sep 16, 2006

Mexico's election crisis took an interesting turn this week, when supporters of election fraud defeated candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador elected him head of a symbolic "parallel" government. Obrador and thousands of protesters have demanded a full recount of votes cast seven weeks ago, but Mexico's electoral court ruled that Obrador's rival, Felipe Calderon, won...[despite egregious vote fraud that calls the whole Mexican neoliberal policy framework into question].

BBC:

The campaign hopes to spend the next six years opposing the rule of Mr Calderon.

Some commentators say the "election" of a parallel administration will help reduce the possibility of radical street demonstrations.

One supporter, Lidia Alvarado, said: "It is going to be very rough for Calderon. Wherever he goes, we'll be there to remind him he became president through fraud."

Link
 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5353074.stm

2.


Mexican political crisis deepens

Mr Obrador's supporters filled Mexico City's main square

Enlarge Image
A mass rally of supporters of defeated Mexican presidential candidate Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has "elected" him head of a parallel government.

Hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in Mexico City's main square, the Zocalo, for the show of hands.

Mr Lopez Obrador and his supporters have said his defeat by less than 1% of the vote was fraudulent.

However, the highest electoral court has backed the result, giving power to conservative candidate Felipe Calderon.

'Legitimate president'

The demonstrators had flocked to the square after an earlier military parade to mark Independence Day that was overseen by outgoing President Vicente Fox.

It is going to be very rough for Calderon
Lidia Alvarado,
Lopez Obrador supporter

Mr Lopez Obrador's supporters had been told to come for a National Democratic Convention.

They voted to swear him in as the "legitimate president" on 20 November, 11 days before Mr Calderon is officially inaugurated.

The BBC's Duncan Kennedy in Mexico City says the event is largely symbolic but will prove a psychological boost to Mr Lopez Obrador's supporters who believe he was cheated.

The campaign hopes to spend the next six years opposing the rule of Mr Calderon.

Some commentators say the "election" of a parallel administration will help reduce the possibility of radical street demonstrations.


Mass rally for Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador in Mexico City

Developments bemuse press

One supporter, Lidia Alvarado, said: "It is going to be very rough for Calderon. Wherever he goes, we'll be there to remind him he became president through fraud."

The protesters had occupied the Zocalo since the election seven weeks ago but agreed to disband the tent city for good ahead of Saturday's military parade.

President Fox reviewed thousands of military personnel in the Zocalo at the parade.

But small groups of Lopez Obrador supporters held up signs reading "Fox, crook" and "Vote by vote".

Their campaign has been based on a call for a full recount of the vote.

Others at the parade cheered Mr Fox and president-elect Mr Calderon, who is from the president's party.

On Friday Mr Fox moved Independence Day celebrations out of the capital amid security fears.

He gave "el grito" - the independence cry of "Viva Mexico!" - from the town of Dolores Hidalgo, 270km (170 miles) north of Mexico City, where in 1810 national hero Miguel Hidalgo established the movement for independence from Spain.

A government spokesman said the event was moved from Mexico City because of fears of radical groups planning violence.

 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5353074.stm


3.


Mexico developments bemuse press

Supporters of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador at the Zocalo plaza, Mexico City
Hundreds of thousands of protesters gathered in the Zocalo

Newspaper columnists in Mexico have reacted to the announcement that Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has been elected president of an "alternative" government by his supporters with a mixture of bemusement, unease and cynicism.

Writing in La Cronica de Hoy, Juan Manuel Martínez is simply pleased that "at least the institutions haven't gone to the devil".

"However tortuously, they have been able to carry out their work. Nevertheless, we are far from resolving this political dispute."

An editorial in Uno mas Uno describes the latest developments in the Lopez Obrador camp as "a fantastic theatre of chatterboxes" and compares the officially defeated candidate as "like Napoleon Bonaparte in his epoch".

"He has crowned himself 'Legitimate President of Mexico'... and his government will be without any institutions as he has sent them all to the devil."

Commenting in Excelsior, Rene Aviles Fabila accuses the Lopez Obrador camp of "abandoning the dignity of the political struggle and concentrating on the lowest kind of street punch-up".

The writer accuses Mr Lopez Obrador of being "surrounded by crooks and the disaffected," and asks whether he intends to dismantle the old system and replace it with one run by the "corrupt and muddled intellectuals".

'New stage'

Backing for the Lopez Obrador cause comes from Rosa Albina Garavito, writing in the centrist El Universal.

She argues that the latest developments "herald a new stage of peaceful civil resistance to the legal but illegitimate imposition of a [new] president".

"No progress has ever been achieved as a concession from the governing class" --Commentator in El Universal

"In every stage of our history, a people mobilised in the legitimate defence of its interests has achieved the country's social, political and economic progress.

"No progress has ever been achieved as a concession from the governing class."

Manuel Mejido, in El Sol de Mexico, is uneasy about the overall situation, and calls on the ruling sectors in Mexico "to take seriously" many of the issues raised by the Lopez Obrador supporters "because they represent the poor, the majority and marginalised bulk of society. Sixty eight million hungry Mexicans".

An editorial in the leftist La Jornada warns there will be no peace for the incoming government of President-elect Felipe Calderon, which will be "severely wounded" from the outset.

And the well-known political analyst Pablo Gonzalez Casanova, writing in the same paper, accuses Washington of openly supporting a massive electoral fraud perpetrated by the government and party of President Vicente Fox, "the former chief of Coca Cola".

 http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/5353814.stm

4.

Mexican Left Creates 'Parallel Gov't'
By LISA J. ADAMS, Associated Press Writer
10:05 PM PDT, September 16, 2006

MEXICO CITY -- Hundreds of thousands of supporters of leftist Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador elected him the leader Saturday of a "parallel government" opposed to President-elect Felipe Calderon's administration.

The symbolic "vote" -- a show of hands in the packed Zocalo plaza -- was the latest development in Mexico's nearly three month electoral dispute. Lopez Obrador claims fraud and illegal government spending were responsible for Calderon's victory by less than 234,000 votes in the July 2 election, and he has vowed to be the new leader's biggest opponent.

It was unclear what the "parallel government," complete with its own Cabinet, would entail.

Lopez Obrador supporters said they would travel the country and set up committees to spread Lopez Obrador's message of helping the nation's millions of poor and opposing the elite.

They also said they would continue protests against the government.

"This is the firm and honorable response to those who have converted our political institutions into a grotesque farce," Lopez Obrador said.

Lopez Obrador will be "sworn in" to his new post on Nov. 20. Calderon will be inaugurated on Dec. 1.

"They won't move forward. Today in our country there exists the collective will to stop them," Lopez Obrador said.

Convention delegates also agreed to boycott major national and international companies that they say supported Calderon's campaign, and agreed to support the formation of a "Progressive Front" to replace the former coalition of leftist parties that backed Lopez Obrador in the national election.

Lopez Obrador said the Front's principal objective would be to fight what he called a large right-wing bloc formed by Calderon's conservative National Action Party and the former ruling Institutional Revolutionary Party.

"Two groups will exist in the country: The rightists and the progressives," he said.

Lopez Obrador retains a strong following despite a Federal Electoral Tribunal ruling this month that rejected most of his fraud allegations and awarded the presidency to Calderon.

Organizers claimed 1.2 million packed the Zocalo and surrounding streets.

"This convention is the most palpable proof of how the people of Mexico feel," said Antonio Romano Hernandez, a 56-year-old baker from Mexico City.

 link to www.latimes.com

5.

Mexican left in parallel government

Sunday 17 September 2006, 12:13 Makka Time, 9:13 GMT

Lopez Obrador says he was cheated of the presidency

Supporters of Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador, Mexico's left-wing presidential runner-up [or "winner rejected", by Calderon coup], voted on Saturday to make him the leader of a parallel government.

The vote - which was a show of hands in the packed Zocalo square - was the latest development in Mexico's months-long electoral dispute.

The massive meeting took place just hours after Vicente Fox, the outgoing conservative president, celebrated independence day with a massive military parade in the square.

Lopez Obrador is to be sworn into his new post as "legitimate president" on November 20.

The vote was greeted by applause.

The parallel government plans to spend the next six years trying to keep Felipe Calderon, the president-elect, from governing.

Independence celebrations

Tens of thousands of left-wing supporters celebrated the traditional independence "grito", or cry, in Mexico City's Zocalo square on Friday night after forcing Vicente Fox, the outgoing president, to lead a separate ceremony outside the capital.

But the supporters removed squatter camps from the city centre, which it had blocked for nearly seven weeks in protest at what it says was fraud in the July 2 elections, to allow the military parade to go ahead on Saturday.

Fox and Calderon, a member of Fox's conservative National Action Party, reviewed the parade as about 200 supporters of Lopez Obrador waved posters that read "Fox, traitor to democracy".

But just minutes after the parade left the Zocalo, leftists moved back in, carrying the large yellow flags of the Democratic Revolution Party and preparing for the massive open-air meeting.

The left claims Fox played a part in election fraud which it says cheated Lopez Obrador of the presidency.

Antonio Fernandez, a pensioner, said: "Fox betrayed the Mexican people. That is unforgivable. Lopez Obrador is my president."

The left claims Fox played a role in election fraud.

Mexico's election court rejected the fraud claims and Calderon is due to take office on December 1.

Mexico has also said it is considering breaking off diplomatic relations with Venezuela after its president, Hugo Chavez, echoed the fraud allegations.

Chavez said in Caracas last week that his government had not recognized Calderon's victory because of concerns about alleged irregularities.

He apparently expanded on his allegations Saturday when interviewed by CNN at the Non-Aligned Movement summit in Havana.

A CNN anchor said Chavez accused Mexico's ruling party of stealing the presidential elections, and that he said Calderon had "destroyed" the opportunity for good relations with Venezuela during his campaign.

In a statement emailed to reporters the Mexican foreign ministry said: "The Mexican government regrets this statement by the Venezuelan leader about a subject that pertains exclusively to Mexicans and their institutions."

"In light of these statements, the Mexican government is evaluating the level of relations it will maintain with the government of Venezuela for the rest of this administration."

 link to english.aljazeera.net
Go Lopez Obrador... 18.Sep.2006 15:59

Pravda or Consequences

This is the start of a real revolution.