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DOW (Agent Orange, Napalm, Bhopal) Wants To Spray Fluoride On Your Food, contact EPA here

EPA PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD ENDS AUGUST 4th. PLEASE SIGN TODAY!!

DOW Chemical has been lobbying the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow it to spray a new fluoride-based pesticide (sulfuryl fluoride) on hundreds of foods prepared in the US.

If DOW gets its way, sulfuryl fluoride will become a major new source of fluoride, making it even more difficult for consumers to avoid fluoride in their daily lives. What's worse, the levels of fluoride allowed to be sprayed on food will be shockingly high: 70 ppm for processed foods, 130 ppm for wheat products, and 900 ppm for dried eggs!

Dow is the world's largest producer of plastics; with its 2001 acquisition of Union Carbide, it has become a major player in the petrochemical industry as well, out of which comes deadly pesticides and herbicides.
this just in...
this just in...
DOW Wants To Spray Fluoride On Your Food
From POWA
7-28-2006

DOW Chemical has been lobbying the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to allow it to spray a new fluoride-based pesticide (sulfuryl fluoride) on hundreds of foods prepared in the US.

If DOW gets its way, sulfuryl fluoride will become a major new source of fluoride, making it even more difficult for consumers to avoid fluoride in their daily lives.

What's worse, the levels of fluoride allowed to be sprayed on food will be shockingly high: 70 ppm for processed foods, 130 ppm for wheat products, and 900 ppm for dried eggs!

To voice your concerns about the use of sulfuryl fluoride on food, please take a few seconds to sign the personalizable ONLINE LETTER to EPA Administrator Stephen Johnson, produced by Fluoride Action Network (FAN) at:

 http://actionstudio.org/?go=2367

If you wish to submit letters on your own, you can find instructions at the Organic Consumers Association (OCA) link:

 link to www.democracyinaction.org

THE EPA PUBLIC COMMENT PERIOD ENDS ON AUGUST 4th. PLEASE SIGN TODAY!!

Thanks for your help with this important issue!!

Please tell your friends!

The POWA Folks


BACKGROUNDER ON DOW: Corporations like this are completely unrequired for sustainability and should be shut down.



Dow Chemical Company (NYSE: DOW TYO: 4850 ) is an American multinational corporation. Headquartered in Midland, Michigan, it is the largest chemical company in the world measured by market capitalization, followed closely by DuPont.

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History

The company originally sold only bleach and potassium bromide, achieving a daily bleach output of 72 tons a day in 1902.

Early in the company's existence, a group of British manufacturers attempted to drive Dow out of business by cutting prices. Dow survived by cutting prices in response and, although losing about $90,000 in income, began to diversify its product line.[10] Even in its early history, the company set a tradition of rapidly diversifying its product line.

Within twenty years, Dow had become a major producer of agricultural chemicals, elemental chlorine, phenol and other dyestuffs, and magnesium metal.

In the 1930s, Dow began production of plastic resins, which would grow to become one of the corporation's major businesses. Its first plastic products were ethylcellulose, made in 1935, and polystyrene, made in 1937.

In 1930, Dow built its first plant to produce magnesium extracted from seawater rather than underground brine. Growth of this business made Dow a strategically important business during World War II, as magnesium became important in fabricating lightweight parts for aircraft. Also during the war, Dow and Corning began their joint venture, Dow Corning, to produce silicones for military and later civilian use.

[So it was out of the war economy we got silicone breast implants....]

Bhopal

Main article: Bhopal disaster

In 1984, a chemical factory operated by Union Carbide, an American company, leaked lethal gases into the surrounding environment, which caused almost 3,000 deaths within a few days and thousands more thereafter, ongoing.

Dow Chemical had no affiliation with Union Carbide at the time of the disaster; however, in 1999, Dow purchased Union Carbide, which is now a wholly-owned subsidiary. Dow currently denies legal liability for the disaster, since it did not own or operate the Bhopal factory and Union Carbide reached "a legal settlement" with the government of India in 1989. [14][15]
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Breast implants

A major manufacturer of silicone breast implants, Dow Corning was successfully sued in 1977 for damages arising from a woman whose implants ruptured; it was the first such successful suit, and Dow Corning paid $170,000 in a settlement. During the 1980s, Ralph Nader's Public Citizen Health Research Group publicised its belief that the implants were cancer-causing; in December of 1990, an episode of Face to Face with Connie Chung addressed the dangers of silicone implants. More lawsuits, as well as Food and Drug Administration reviews, Congressional hearings, and scientific studies took place in the ensuing years; as of December 1991, 137 individual lawsuits were filed against Dow Corning, a figure that would rise to 3,558 in December 1992, and 19,092 by December 1994. Amidst the flurry of lawsuits in May 1995, Dow Corning filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection; several judgments against Dow Corning and Dow Chemical were handed down in lawsuits.
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Napalm

During the Vietnam War, Dow became the sole supplier of napalm to the United States military.

Napalm, an incendiary liquid used as a weapon in Vietnam, led to human casualties that were widely displayed in the news media. Protests of Dow took place at many colleges (the first taking place in October 1966 at University of California, Berkeley and Wayne State University in Michigan); some were in response to Dow recruiters coming to college campuses. Despite the public outcry, in 1967 Dow's board of directors voted to continue production of napalm (after attempting to persuade the U.S. Department of Defense to accept responsibility for napalm and exculpate Dow's management.)

The napalm controversy caused a major increase in the public's awareness of Dow; ironically, the company's image was not always harmed by the napalm-related publicity, with the number of interviews on campuses increasing.[16]
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Agent Orange

Agent Orange, a chemical defoliant containing dioxin, was also manufactured by Dow for use by the U.S. military during the Vietnam War; the dioxin from the defoliant made its way into the food chain and was linked to a major increase in birth defects among Vietnamese people.

In 2005, a lawsuit was filed by Vietnamese victims of Agent Orange against Dow and Monsanto Company, which also supplied Agent Orange to the military.

The companies argued that no link between Agent Orange and the alleged health problems had been proven, and furthermore that the companies are not responsible for the manner in which their products are used by the military.[17] The lawsuit was thrown out.[18]

In 2006, a court in South Korea did order Dow and Monsanto to compensate South Korean veterans of the Vietnam War and their families for Agent Orange-related injuries.[19]
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Dioxins in Michigan

Starting in the early 2000s, residents living on the Tittabawassee River near the company's headquarters in Midland and nearby Saginaw counties in Michigan filed a class-action lawsuit against the company for dioxin contamination (levels of dioxins were found above those allowed by the Department of Environmental Quality) in the soil on the riverbed and along its shores. As of June 2005, the case is still awaiting class certification. [1]

....


Dow CEO Andrew N. Liveris called 2005 the company's "best year ever" with operating profits of $5.4 billion, a jump of 56.5% compared with the previous year. [20] Net income rose more than 60% to $4.5 billion, on sales of $46.3 billion.

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dow_Chemical