portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article reporting global

animal rights | corporate dominance

Stop the United States of Goldman Sachs

Goldman Sachs: invested in war, slaughterhouses,
deforestation
Goldman Sachs, major investor in slaughterhouse and meat companies,
dominates the US government. Henry Paulsen, CEO of Goldman Sachs, has now been nominated to be the Secretary of the Treasury. As chairman of the board of Nature Conservancy he has steered NC into allowing slaughterhouse bound animals on its 'wilderness' tracts. The most devastating of environmental impacts is caused by the animal agriculture industry.
This week Goldman Sachs along with Maurice Greenberg's AIG bid to control the Canadian energy market by attempting to take Kinder Morgan's 43,000 miles of pipelines private, with a 13.8 billion dollar bid. Private equity firms
have dealings hidden from the public. Many Americans are
calling for the nationalization of American pipelines and energy
and utility companies, so important to national security.

War profiteering has been privatized in many cases as well. One
example is the Carlyle Group, cofounded by David Rubenstein,
which has attracted the private investment money of George H W
Bush, former UK PM John Major, and others. These men profiteered from
the sale of obsolete howitzers to the military. Gerald Ford rose
to billionaire status through the help of Sanford Weill of Citibank.
Republican presidents whose ascendancy to power has been
fraudulent, have descended from power with stolen monies.


Jon Corzine, governor of pharmaceutically dominated NJ, is a former CEO of Goldman Sachs. Goldman Sachs is also a major promoter of the war in Iraq and has many ties to Israeli capital. Israeli capital is also illegally
controlling ABC Disney through an extra-US holding company deceptively
called "Shamrock."
While NPR twice reported the Bush nomination as if it were a done deal, it is not.

US senators can turn down the nomination.
 http://www.senate.gov

homepage: homepage: http://www.public-integrity.org


apologies for misspelling Henry Paulson 31.May.2006 18:07

Sathya Spreads

apologies for misspelling Henry Paulson

Goldamn Sachs and 9-11, pretty key as well 31.May.2006 21:49

more

Could this be added to the "9.11 investigation" category as well?

Very interesting, given that it was Goldman Sachs that did the financing for the 9-11 Silverstein deal of the WTCs. Later Goldman Sachs bought up "the other 110 story building" in the U.S., the Chicago Sears Tower, quietly and quickly in 2003..

They are also involved in the gold price fraud issues in the commodity markets (holding it down "artificially" for political purposes), reportedly.

The guy who sold Silverstein the WTCs was...previously of Goldman Sachs as well. This was an Eisenberg, placed on the Port Authority from 1995.

Other Eisenbergs are Bilderbergers.

Their father was an international Israeli arms dealer, Shoul Eisenberg, who was a co-invester in Israeli Corporation, a 30 year tax-free vehicle for the Eisenbergs, Warburgs, and Rothschilds and others to "invest" (buy up) collectively in almost everything within Israel as a glorified tax dodge holding company of note.

More on Goldman Sachs ranchification of wilderness tracts 05.Jun.2006 11:53

Sathya Spreads

didn't realize that Goldman Sachs funded Silverstein, who has made billions
on the people's property managed by the NY Port
Authority thank you
----------------

More on Goldman Sachs' Henry Paulson and the ranchification of "Nature
Conservancy" which does not seem to use recycled paper in its
'environment' magazine

nature.org the NC magazine claims that buying ranches which cause
desertification is a way to save wetlands as claimed in the following article:

Saving Wetlands and a Way of Life on the Plains

It's 26 miles to town, and the chores never end. But for ranchers
Shane and Kristi Daniels and their four daughters, the Horse Creek Fen
Ranch, deep in the Nebraska Sandhills, is home-and a dream come true.
"It took a miracle to get us started," Shane says, "but this is
where we'll be when we're old and gray."

The miracle in this case is The Nature Conservancy's Beginning
Rancher Program, prompted by the organization's 1997 purchase of the
3,240-acre ranch, including 20-some critical downstream acres of Horse
Creek Fen. Set like a jewel in the wind-carved and semiarid Sandhills,
the fen holds deep peat soils that nourish a mix of moisture-loving
plants, small fish and the globally imperiled Blanding's turtle.

"All we really needed to do was protect that fen," says Jim
Luchsinger, the Conservancy's project director for the region. A
conservation easement (a voluntary protection agreement) was
established for the wetland, but something else in the region needed
protection: family ranches. Such ranches have been disappearing as
young people leave and the land is consolidated into huge operations.
"The reason this land is in good condition is because ranchers have
given it such good stewardship," says Luch-singer. "We want to see
that continue." He adds: "Conservation and agriculture can and
should work together."

The desire to foster that cooperation prompted talks with the Sandhills
Task Force, a nonprofit conservation and ranching group, and the talks
led to the Beginning Rancher Program. The groups looked for a ranching
family that was willing to trade a lot of sweat equity for the chance
to own the Horse Creek Fen Ranch. The Daniels, who have family roots in
ranching, were chosen from five applicants. During a five-year lease
agreement, the couple has the option to buy the ranch at its 2005
appraised value, minus the price of the easement (which the Conservancy
retains).

The couple, who are building a herd of cattle, say they want to set the
standard that demonstrates how well the Beginning Rancher Program can
work, as the Conservancy looks to replicate the model with other
ranching families. Says Shane, "We're going to set the bar high."

Goldman Sachs' Insider Trading 09.Jun.2006 09:07

Sathya Spreads

In 1987 partners of Goldman Sachs were deciding on whether or not to fire
Robert Freeman, convicted of insider trading.

The crime at Goldman Sachs is in being caught.
A group of foxes decide whether or not to convict another fox
of being in the chicken coop.

(All of us abuse humans and animals whether by driving a car, using wood
and paper, eating unorganic or machine harvested food, swatting mosquitoes
etc. God open the hearts of all of us.)