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Victory! Neighbors Triumph Over Developers -- For Now

The Mississippi Avenue Lofts (MAL) developers have been working for months to get a new 4 story development on N Mississippi Avenue approved. After initially being denied a letter of support from the neighborhood, at the last Boise Neighborhood Association (BNA) meeting they were able to eek out a majority. On the record there were 66 votes supporting the lofts, 47 votes opposing, and 10 abstaining.

Their design was also approved by the Bureau of Development Services (BDS). Being in a Conservation District they were required to meet the guidelines for new developments. A diligent neighbor appealed the BDS decision forcing a hearing before the Historical Landmarks Commission which took place today, May 22.

When I arrived at the hearing, 10 minutes late since i had rushed from work on the other side of town, the room was nearly completely packed. I arrived to the hear the Commissions Chair finishing up the rules, guidelines and time limits.

The hearing began with the BDS representative, Justin Fallon Dollard giving an overview of the project and what specifically was up for review. He consistently used the word "we" when referring to the project. I assume this is because he worked with the developers to find ways to get around community guidelines. And I mean get around them, not necessarily address them. One example of "getting around them" is his suggestion (and ultimately an addition to the MAL) of scoring the hanging concrete walls on the north and south. He suggested this to satisy "blending in" to the neighborhood. During the deliberation of the Commission, one of the volunteers scoffed at that addition as a poor attempt to "blend in."

Blending in, and what that means, seemed to be a large part of why these developers went home with frowns on their faces.

After the overview by the BDS, and after a few clarifying questions from the Commission, the hearing turned over to listen to testimony from people AGAINST the project. I am unsure of the exact number, but around 13 concerned neighbors took the stand to testify against the development and how it doesnt blend into the neighborhood, how the developers sidestepped process issues, and how this new development will affect the qulaity of life in the neighborhood and the overall quality of the neighborhood.

One of the issues was the sidewalk. PDOT has Mississippi listed as a pedestrian corridor and the requirements of that designation is a 12 foot sidewalk. The developers were charged to take space from their building to allow for this sidewalk to exist. One of the Historic Streetcar Era holdovers is the width of Mississippi Ave. It is only two driving lanes and parking on each side of the street, but it is much wider than Hawthorne or Belmont or NW 23rd because it used to run a Streetcar. The developers found a way to get PDOT to approve reducing the street, the public right of way, by two feet to allow for the sidewalk. Since MAL isnt on a corner this creates an hourglass effect pushing the sidewalk out 2 feet just for their 150 ft development. Cyclists would especially be affected by this theft of the public right of way.

Another issue was loading. MAL projects their commercial spaces to include a small specialty grocery and a credit union. Two things that Mississippi Ave could benefit from. For a development their size they are required to have a designated loading zone on their property. This didnt fit into their plan, so they drew up their development and asked BDS to allow a temp. loading zone on Mississippi Ave, this was denied and their loading zone ended up in the alley. Many of the resident on the other side of that alley use it frequently and were unhappy of having a frequent loader (grocery) in the alley, thus reducing their use of it.

Other issues included the mass of the building, inadequate off street parking, and other historical aspects. A resident of the neighborhood since 1928 came and testified that there were never any 4 story buildings on Mississippi. The developers have been citing "historical" 4 story buildings as their model...but no photos or evidence of those building existing on the street have ever appeared. Blending, as previously stated, was a large issue. The Commission reviewed their plan and the materials that they planned to use, and concluded that horizontal flats do not blend with the traditional shiplap and the stained wood doesnt blend with the traditional colored wood. IT was summe dup that the MAL would dominate the street instead of blend into it.

One person stated that the appeal of the Mississippi Corridor was its quaint charm, approachabilty and qualtiy of life. This development would be eroding each one of those things.

Once all of the testimony from the Apellants were heard the Commission Chair noted the 6 or so other comments on record from folks attending that did not wish to speak. Then it was time for the supporters to testify. The only person speaking in support of the project was one of the developers, Peter Wilcox.

After the supporter spoke, the Commission moved to close the record and deliberate. I was thinking that they would leave the room and talk but they just closed the record and started deliberating with everyone in the room available to hear. To be honest I was nervous. The BDS with Justin Fallon Dollard were clearly supporting the developers at the expense of the neighbors and there wasnt any clear signs from the commission. But then they deliberated.

One commission member started addressing the Loading, stating that she was against it being in the alley and would rather see it on Mississippi or on site. Then to the massing, because the area where this development is proposed isnt fully developed (there are two empty lots near it and across Mississippi are mostly small homes) the MAL would clearly not blend in. She stated that sheer size in a conservation district is a large issue and that step downs to break up the block could assist in reducing the mass. Another commission member was quoted saying "the design has not yet gone far enough in reducsing the mass." And noted that the front facade required further breaking down to reflect existing businesses (further down Mississippi.)

At this point I was feeling much more confident. Especially since the commission member were slipping in compliments to the neighbors for coming out and stating that they hadnt seen a larger turnout for a review in a long time. Then one of the commission said very clearly into her microphone "Bravo!" to all the neighborhood folks who came out today, and to note that she is struck by the uniqueness of the neighborhood. And another member said that the community reaction is due to the MAL taking alot away from the neighborhood and offering nothing back while developments like The Rebuilding Center, Pistils, the Rexall Building, and the Mississippi Commons were offering gathering spaces and open community green spaces.

Another suggestion was to use a variety of blocks at varying heights and setbacks, adding in that a 4 story development in this neighborhood, while approved by code, is pushing the envelope. And it poured on, with a commission member even stating that they disagreed with the BDS that the building was a streetcar era likeness. And something that wasnt talked about widely but addressed by the commission was the width of the development. At 150ft, it would be the longest starkest tallest front on the street and it was suggested to break that up a bit. Finally it was summed up "all these little things add up to a non-historical building."

The developers were then offered a choice: they could walk away denied by the commission and have to start from square one, or they could plea for a continuance. The continuance would give them a chance to meet with the community and to redesign their buidling to address the commissions concerns and the neighbors concerns. Ultimately they have the task of taking a four story building with a huge mass and nothing similar around it and making it blend.

They have until June 12th to do this. This is a huge victory for the neighbors, this helps to affirm neighbors and reminds us all that the power is in our hands we just need to gather our energy to remind the people in power that their power is afforded by our satisfaction. The Commission moved to re-hear this issue with modifications on the 12th. They suggested that the developers meet with the neighbors and do their best to address the concerns. The neighbors are planning two meetings with the developers before the 12th. Stay tuned for more information.

Something I don't understand 22.May.2006 23:05

? for bht

bht, aren't you the co-chair of the Boise Neighborhood Association? If so, then why weren't you one of the main people to appeal and testify in opposition?

Also, why wasn't the project's incompatibility with the Albina Plan ever discussed?

Shame on Peter Wilcox! 22.May.2006 23:09

Architecture friend

Peter Wilcox, the supposed advocate of neighborhood-friendly buildings, designing this pure crap! Shame on him!

Good for you! 23.May.2006 00:03

overwhelmed westsider

Congrats! It undoubtedly took a lot of effort for people concened about the impact of the proposed development to show up to the meeting and make their concerns known to the commission. This is what it takes. The loft developers recognize the enormous effort it takes to do this, and hope to use it, as developers routinely do, to their personal gain, at the expense of a community. If nobody had showed up to object to their plans because of the great effort and inconvenience that it takes to do so, approval would quite possibly have received commission approval and steamed ahead as so often happens.

Increased citizen resident involvement in planning is crucial to avoid quality of life deterioration that occurs as a consequence of development proposals conceived by individuals indifferent to existing neighborhood character. It's quite likely the developers will adjust the configuration of the their building to meet the character of the avenue, because the alternative, bailing out of a promising new district over quibbles about a profit margin less generous than hoped for would be just stupid.

Mississippi ave citizens, stay the course. Make history by allowing new development that will sustain the character of this wonderful neighborhood. It will require more sacrifices of your time as it did to attend this meeting, but it will worth it for many more than yourselves, and that is the real payoff.

Don't celebrate just yet! 23.May.2006 07:14

experienced

I wouldn't celebrate just yet. Developers and their lawyers have extremely wily ways of getting in to even the seemingly most progressive of commissioners to get their projects done the way they want them. The usual tactic is a form of extortion: "If you don't approve this project the way we want it, we won't do it at all." That, to city commissioners, planners, and design commission members, is akin to being delivered the death sentence. For some reason, people in positions of political or bureaucratic power feel that their livelihoods and very existence are threatened by no new developments, particularly large ones, as the presence of untrammeled fields and trees in the city appears worse to them than a slum. Developers exploit these fears to get their ways, and they do pretty much get their ways every time. Preventing the MAL developers from getting their way will set a precedent. What they want is not to improve the neighborhood or to help the city transition into bringing its population and consumption down within the limited carrying capacity of the Columbia-Willamette Watershed, but to enrich themselves through the gimmick of politically-correct "sustainable" growth. The needs of the neighbors are their very last concerns.

So, ride on this latest victory, but consult with other neighborhoods on their successes and failures in this arena, particularly the Northwest District Association, which gets assaulted more than any other neighborhood with huge, ungainly, neighborhood unfriendly projects in their historic district.

one answer 23.May.2006 09:04

bht

"bht, aren't you the co-chair of the Boise Neighborhood Association? If so, then why weren't you one of the main people to appeal and testify in opposition? "

i am not a co-chair of the neighborhood. i am a co-chair for the land use position in the neighborhood. the other chair of land use is David Yoho, one of the Mississippi Avenue Lofts Developers.

i have been scrutinzed for overlapping my role as a neighbor and as a land use chair, and accused of using my position to gain leverage. The BNA board members (and past board members) that did testify make a clear distinction that they were board members but speaking for themselves.

i was unprepared to give a statement because i was unsure if i could make the hearing. i work a day job (like most people) and this was too short of a notice for me to request the day off. i got off work early to rush down to the BDS for the hearing.

i did leave a comment on record that addressed the sidewalk extension. i stated that if this development was going to take public right of way, the neighborhood should be included in that decision. One of the things we hope to look at in the next three weeks is the sidewalk extension, whose idea it was and why this wasnt brought to the neighborhood for approval.

another answer 23.May.2006 11:21

lupin

the reason we didn't use the albina community plan was because justin fallon-dollard(BDS) had told us that, the plan was not law only used to consider and because of this we couldn't use it to argue whether the project met the criteria or not... I am still confussed about this since I had been told the Albina Community Plan was interpretted as a law. and, in retrospect we should have used it because wilcox used it over and over (along with his stating his tired record of working many years on affordable housing in the ne and doing this and that blah blah blah. like his working in the ne for years ought to give him carte blanche to do whatever the hell he wants now?).

bravo! 23.May.2006 12:25

emily

I'm still grinning from ear to ear about last night's victory. Boise neighbors have worked tirelessly to bridge the gap between developers and residents. Over the course of my term as co-chair for the Boise neighborhood association, I've been told by fellow board members, city officials, and corporate media representatives that we are simply wasting our time. I cannot say how many times I've heard the threats: "You must not give developers a hard time, or else none of them will want to work with you." or "You should be so lucky that sustainable developments are coming into the neighborhood rather than corporate chains." We've been accused of being whiners, NIMBYs, and lawless radicals. For the critics, I urge you to attend our meetings. Witness the diversity that exists among us. See for yourself that not only are we whiners, NIMBYs, and radicals... we are also homeowners, renters, business owners, young, old, united by the passion to preserve the space we call home.

I can now confidently say that last night's decision by the Historic Landmarks Commission speaks loud and clear: Neighborhood involvement pays off.

I commend the Commissioners for their regard of the Design Guidelines, as well as for their recognition of a strong community that will not be silenced. Also to all of the neighbors who took time last night, or who have devoted their time over the past several months, BRAVO. We are only a piece in the unfinished history of the Boise neighborhood.

Thankyou and congratulations 23.May.2006 16:04

Grateful neighbor

"The developers have been citing "historical" 4 story buildings as their model...but no photos or evidence of those building existing on the street have ever appeared".

I think it is also important to note here that the developers did supply the commission with photos from the era,showing 4 story buildings, but as the commission noticed, pretty quickly, none of the photo's were of North Mississippi. They actually brought era photos of North Albina and Williams, but did not make that fact to the commission till questioned ?

Also it's good to note ,that there was 1 person who had signed up to speak in support of the Mississippi Lofts, and that was Koniko Kurisu, who with her brother are in the planning process for yet another proposed 4 story development on the community pocket park, north of NAYA and across from the Fresh pot coffee shop and Mississippi Records . But when called to speak, she had left.

Schedule for Special Land Use Meetings 23.May.2006 22:26

resident

Hello.

At the Historical Landmarks Commission on May 22nd, the Mississippi Avenue Lofts were granted a continuation until June 12th to revise their development to address the concerns of neighbors and the commission. The commission recommended that the developers meet with the land use committee of the Boise Neighborhood Association.

Due to the lack of time to discuss these issues more formally, I have scheduled two meetings to work with the Mississippi Avenue Lofts Developers and Architects before the June 12th deadline.

The first meeting is scheduled for Tuesday May 30th, 7pm at Albina Youth Oppurtunity School (AYOS). This meeting will be a public participation meeting. I ask the developers to take the recommendations from Monday's hearing and come to the meeting on the 30th with revised plans to present to neighbors and then hear concerns and critiques.

The second meeting is scheculed for Tuesday June 6th, 7pm at AYOS. This meeting will be open to the public but be more sturctured. A small group of neighbors and the developers will sit down to work through specific issues and find points where each can concede. Participation in this meeting will be restricted to those deliberating, however anyone can attend the meeting.

A public information campaign will take place the weekend before the first meeting with the intent of flyering all residences in the neighborhood to alert them to the meetings and offer them a chance to extend their voices. If you are able to assist with this effort, please come by the Black Rose Bookstore between 12pm-8 on Friday-Sunday.

Thank you,
Brian Bailitz (bht)
Land Use Co-chair

the visual mass of the MALformed Project 23.May.2006 22:29

Jeff

When I first heard about the project I was surprised about the scale of this beast. When I started to look more closely at the existing buildings in our neighborhood, I wondered how it would compare visually.

I spent a good chunk of Sunday (just before the appeal) running around the neighborhood, shooting buildings and taking measurements so I could place the buildings to scale next to the proposed development--As I assembled the images in Photoshop I couldn't believe my eyes, and furthermore I had to triple check most measurements -- I didn't want to be biased either way, I simply wanted an objective way to understand how big this building would be.

Look for yourself - I think you will be surprised! presentation.pdf

And if you're wondering, no, I didn't get to show this whole thing--I didn't know that I had to supply my own projector for my laptop, fortunately I brought along 4 copies of a few key prints from this presentation.

The support was great, and next time (assuming we have an unreasonable proposal) it'd be great to have more people!

Jeff

acronyms say alot 23.May.2006 22:38

mississippi neighbor

acronyms are extremely interesting things. whoever thinks them up must have a vibrant subconscious that spells out the truth that is trying to be hidden. like Operation Iraqi Liberation (OIL) which was the original acronym or Operation Iraqi Freedom.

the Mississippi Avenue Lofts acronym is MAL. which is spanish for "BAD." with immigration protests and Bush taking a hard line stance against latinos, largely spaish speaking, this ties in to the current events.

and the final message is this: "MAL" still translates as "BAD"

image 23.May.2006 23:08

from jeffs presentation

this is a better updated idea than the current feature pic.
48 feet 9 inches, Mississippi Avenue Lofts
48 feet 9 inches, Mississippi Avenue Lofts

another image 24.May.2006 10:50

from craigslist

the developers have listed their building on craigslist -- even though they are one hair away from being denied. here is the image they include there. notice how they didnt include the house to the south of their building, perhaps that house would reveal the scale of the building?

also, in this photo you can see the scored concrete south wall, a poor attempt to blend into the neighborhood.
mississippi lofts wothout the wych elm house
mississippi lofts wothout the wych elm house

from craigslist 24.May.2006 14:17

i saw this on craigslist

Title: (real estate for sale) re: New Green Lofts on North Mississippi Avenue

reader note: this ad New Green Lofts on North Mississippi Avenue is a sham!

the developers are consistently denying to work with the neighborhood and creating an unwelcome space. new residents and businesses of this building, if approved, could be subject to neighborhood resentment based on the developers lack of care for those around them.

read this article on the near denial of this project from the Historic Landmarks Commission.

these developers, like most, are looking out for their own interest and may be setting up potential buyers with an unhealthy situation. there are community and city meetings discussing this project noted in the above link.

4138 N Mississippi at Skidmore


actual height 24.May.2006 16:15

Jeff

It should be noted that
  • "official" height is measured from the highest elevation from the lot when the grade drops less than 10' (as in this case)
  • the developers use the mid-point of the roof (which slopes up towards the front on Mississippi Ave) as the 45 foot marker, so the actual height at the "short" end according to their drawings is 46' 8.75"
  • the actual height on the tall end - i.e. the south end - (given the grade) is 51' 8.79" (again from their drawings)
  • in the hearing, Justin stated it was approx 45' at the north end and 48' at the south end (I think he needs a refresher course on basic math)
  • FYI, the reference of 16'3" is my personally measured height of the existing structure (on that south end, I read the N. end at 13'3") so as you can see in the picture the proposal calls for more than trippling the height (!!)

some facts 25.May.2006 09:34

lupin

after some validity checks(by-law voter critera, sign in sheet correlated with ballots) the actual count for BNA letter of support was: 63 yes; 47 no ; 10 abstain -- not a sweeping majority on any counts. Interestingly if you take out the business/property owners(such as the likes of Billy Grippo(who facilitated ousting the long, long time business the t-shirt shop) and brian wannamaker then here's how it pans out:

38 yes; 43 no ;9 abstain

also, and I don't have the exact numbers here(emily, could you post them?), there was a significant number of yes votes coming from failing st and south ... I'd also be curious to see how it breaks down for number of years residing in boise. and another thing there were a lot of folks against the design that were unable to come to the meeting.

Class and Cultural divsions exist- Do we sweep it under the rug ? 25.May.2006 11:02

X

Back on April 19th, I had the pleasure of attending a community discussion on the Gentrification issue- Gentrification: A Restorative Listening Circle. At the First AME Zion Church on the North east corner of Skidmore & Vancouver. I heard from my elders about the North,Northeast neighborhoods and the caring communities and homes they had made for them and their families, and the struggles to create and sustain diverse communites with tools being used against them such as redlining by local banks (a process of not giving home loans to black and poor whites to buy homes), the flooding by outside forces of alcohol and drugs into poor & working class communties, which is a national tool, which as has been proven by people like Michael Ruppert, an ex LA- cop, who found evidence of government agencies involvement in the South Central & Compton drug trade, as well as the involvement in the drug trade by racist Italian and eastern european gangs and militant white power gangs, who before seeing the profitability of flooding and controlling the drug supply, had a more sinister ethnic cleansing motive . The constant destruction and relocation of black residents and business communties by the city of Portland. Just doing a little historic research and talking to our elders will make you think and question. I heard a lot of concern and frustration in that Church setting of "But What Can We Do", John Canda from the Northeast Coalition Of Neighbors, held up the Boise Neighborhood Assication and it's board as a way for people to get involved. I had looked forward to seeing the presence and hearing the concerned voices at the last Boise Neighborhood Meeting of those people that spoke out about the negative aspects of the gentrification process in Boise and the rest of North & Northeast, the pastors that spoke of rallying their congregations and talked of the churches failure of addressing and taking part in the issue. Their voice was truly missed, and I realize we have so many years and years of healing to do. It is our responsibility to make space and bring our diverse community to the table. This will mean facing up to , recognizing and responding to uncomfortable traditions of power structures and perceptions of domination. If we do not reach out to heal the cultural and economic divisons, the response will be more frustration, anger and ultimately violence. I urge the Northeast Coalition Of Neighbors and the Office Of Neighborhhood Involvement to facilitate bringing our diverse communties to the table...

in the interest of all 26.May.2006 00:36

westsider

Naturally, developers would seek to stack the deck in their favor by strategies such as loading the neighborhood association letter of support with members of the business community aligned with their ambition regarding the loft project. It would be a serious mistake to confuse the results of such a strategy favoring those ambitions, with the will, and best interests of community residents.

Mississipi Street, the business quarter of the neighborhood, is a key component of the neighborhood, whose design realization rightfully belongs to all residents of the neighborhood, with due respect to business owner property rights.

The proposed lofts occupy the west side of the street. When the building goes the up, the sun goes away. The proposed building lacks the character of older structures, because simulating the kind of stylistic ornamentation and detailing of historic structures on them in newer construction obliged to meet modern codes, is extra money. Developers go for the cheapest design that will bring the greatest return. That's why the loft design has the bleak, stripped down, industrial modern design that looks so cheap next to the handcrafted houses and brick built buildings on the street.

Developers, planners, and architects with vision, who build as much for pride and heritage as they do for money, seem to be increasingly rare as the decades pass. Not like in the early decades of last century where such people made efforts to invest visual inspiration in even the most modest structures.

Re; the scored concrete. Hard to tell exactly from the pic earlier in this thread, but it looks mostly pathetic. Scored walls can be very artistic though. Case in point, and a possible suggestion for the developers: North wall of the South Park Apartments....between S.W. Park and 10th on Clay if I remember right. The brick is carved with two large panels suggesting naturally grown trees.

The proposed loft is too tall. It's too long. Take 20' out of the middle, create a private, brick fenced play area, garden space for residents. That will break up some of the monolithic character of the loft structure, and allow a little sunlight to continue lighting the street.

Updated Land Use / Developer Meetings 26.May.2006 13:04

bht

due to scheduling conflicts, the meetings times dates and places have altered a bit. i am extremely sorry for any inconvenience.

the first meeting will be WEDNESDAY MAY 31st @ AYOS from 7-9pm AYOS is located on the corner of Mississippi and Beech. this meeting is still open to the public, however participants may only comment on the design of the building and how to make the building blend in more. this is not about approving or disapproving of the development.

the second meeting is still Tuesday June 6th. it has been moved to Michael Willis Offices at NW 9th and Glisan from 3-6 pm. This will be a strategy and design meeting with a small group of neighbors (aka the land use committee) and the architects.

again i apologize for the inconvenience and hope to see many neighbors at the May 31st meeting.


Comparison of MAL to Early Head Start 30.May.2006 22:24

Anonymous

The attached photo compares the MAL project to the Early Head Start building at the corner of Mississippi and Skidmore. It is a contributing structure to the Historic Mississippi Conservation District. For those of you who have not quite grasped the mass of this project, one picture is worth a thousand words. Thanks Jeff.
Comparison of MAL to Early Head Start
Comparison of MAL to Early Head Start

where's the latest news? 01.Jun.2006 22:23

here

Just wondering regarding any news coming out of the wenesday, may 31st meeting. Good, bad, or uneventful, people should know. Checked the BDS site but no news posted there.

meeting update, of sorts 03.Jun.2006 11:18

lupin

I was hoping somebody else would report on the meeting we had with the developers because I did not stay, since it seemed to me to be a sham and a waste of my time. I have heard from several people who reported what happened after I left so I will report on what I've heard.

the developers had a huge drawing of their, unchanged project displayed in the front of the mtg room along with a bunch of other pictures of buildings on mississippi and other surrounding streets(albina for example). One of the architects began his speech that described, yet again, the project and how it's designed and why and how he lives in the neighborhood and how great the building is and on and on and on. After listening to what seemed like hours of this, my neighbors and I began exchanging looks of disbelief and disgust, what we had feared was looking to be true, in the nine days since the historic landmark committee sent them off to redesign their building they had done nothing. even more insulting was that they were taking up so much of our valuable time with a long, long speech on the merits of their building they had been directed to redesign... I interrupted the architect and told him as much and then left.

Those who stayed said that the speech went on for quite some time and then they broke up into 3 groups. Each group had at least one architect at the table and a big drawing of their design. Members of the table drew ideas out for them and exchanged ideas. Most report it seemed productive and even fun. What everybody seemed to have gotten out of the meeting is that the architects seem to get what they have been ask , by the commission and neighbors, to do but the developers are unwilling to reduce the mass, period. One person feels that Peter Wilcox is blinded by the gold LEED certificate he hopes to get and he believes he can not afford it if he eliminates any units(revenue). seems this gold leed business is BIG stuff, very prestigious and very expensive and he is hell bent on having this project, his last swan song(?) , make him a famous man. (while this leed business is certainly noble, I must say that many of us have noble goals but we can't afford them and so, rather than obtain something noble at the expensive of others, we , as adults, settle for what we can afford or save for our goal(delaying gratification)).

other interesting and revealing tidbits gleened from the meeting were that the developers do not own the land, as they've maintained to the BNA for a year. This is also troubling since the developers wife, Bridgett Bayer voted at the BNA meeting to send a letter of support and listed the MAL site as her address... and David Yoho , one of the developers had gotten himself elected to the BNA board as the land use co-chair in november 05.... naughty , naughty. Thankfully, yoho sent an email to the BNA officially resigning his chairship.

I am not very hopeful that we will see any reduction of the mass at our next meeting . I am however confident that the Historic Landmark Commission is not going to be amused by superficial changes and no reduction of the mass.

and, rumor has it that Nicole Williams (past bna chair and current safety chair) and the light buld lady, kay newall are running around like chickens with their heads cut off trying to get the BNA chairs who testified at the landmark commission hearing punished for committing mutiny. Aren't they silly, afterall, and this is taped all of the chairs made it abundantely clear that they were not testifying on behalf of the BNA or as their roles as chairs. gosh, these people need hobbies.

Some more facts 13.Sep.2006 00:37

Billy Grippo

I appreciate all of the discussion and passion to preserve the Mississippi/Albina neighborhood, but also wanted to correct lupin's comment, and comments from others regarding my "facillitating the closure of the T shirt company on Mississippi Ave". My wife and I purchased the property about 4 years ago from a seller that bought it FROM the owner (Ellie) of the T shirt company. That seller bought it from Ellie 10 years ago. Part of their original transaction had been a 10 year lease at 1/10 of the market rent. This lease was a legal binding agreement that went along with the sale of the property to me. When the lease term was fulfilled I offered the T shirt company that right to renew the lease at a very low rate (less than 1/2 of what rents are currently on the street), but more than what she for what she had been paying for the past 10 years.
This information, like all recorded property sales is public record, is available at any title company, and can easily be verified.

I realize that there are many different opinions on the changes that are happening on Mississippi, but it's much more productive for everyone to not to forget to be kind to each other. Thank you.