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The End of Sex?

Pornography is changing the nature of physical affection.
In 2006, it seems impossible to write with any certainty about most things: the changing balance in international relations; the precise implications of global warming; who will win this summer's World Cup finals in Germany. But one thing does appears concrete: pornography, for so long a relatively unrecognized and unimportant phenomenon, appears to have become the industrialized world's number one cultural product.

If that strikes you as surprising, then the following information should be instructive. Pornography is now globally worth $57 billion, with the United States - porn's spiritual home - accounting for $12 billion (by comparison, Hollywood is worth a mere $10 billion). In the United States, a conservative estimate of new pornographic movie production is 50 new movies a day, and more than 500 million porno films are rented every year. The latter figure of course excludes telephone sex - 250,000 Americans pay for this daily - and Internet porn, which is estimated to be worth at least $1 billion globally and generates an astonishing 70 percent of all revenues earned by online content providers.

Add into the mix all the pornography available on television, mobile phones, in "table-dancing" clubs - these are extremely popular in the United States and the United Kingdom, with there being around 700 such bars in Manhattan alone - and it seems that porn is beyond ubiquitous. One American cultural commentator recently concluded that the Western world has become "pornified"; with hardcore material easily procurable from the kiosks of Athens to the humble desktop in Cambridge, it is very hard to argue with this contention.
But what does this actually mean? Is this mushrooming of manufactured sex a positive or negative development? What significance, if any, does it have for sex itself?

In fact, the pornographization of both public and private space has consequences so profound that it arguably already has changed the very nature of sex in five key ways.

Firstly, porn has seeped into the rest of popular culture, significantly altering how people think about sex. For example, an average hour on the three major American television networks - ABC, CBS and NBC - yield some 15 sexual acts, words and innuendos, or one every four minutes. Globally popular teleseries such as Sex in the City and even teen dramas such as The O.C. feature footage and/or storylines clearly influenced by pornography.

Strippers and prostitutes are featured with regularity in video games such as Grand Theft Auto. Overt sexual imagery is now used to sell everything from cars to alcoholic beverages. Arguably the most famous pornographic logo of all, the Playboy bunny, has now become a favorite of girls in their early teenage years and younger, who sport the logo on official badges, satchels and clothing.

The most obvious consequence of this is that women, and girls in their teens and twenties in particular, are regarded by many - including themselves - as little more than extras on a porn movie set. They are expected to be permanently sexually available in a way that renders any concern over the issue of consent to secondary importance. For example, as the pornography industry started to explode in the mid-1990s, a survey of U.S. college girls showed that 69.8 percent of them had been "verbally coerced" into having "unwanted sex"; in the United Kingdom in 2006, 33 percent of all women say that they have been forced into sex.

In other words, rape has been normalized, a trend which is reflected in ever more lenient prosecution and sentencing procedures. Moreover, women are increasingly expected to agree to practices - such as anal sex and faux lesbianism -which the vast majority of them find of no pleasure or even profoundly repulsive.

Secondly, pornography has made sex more violent. In a study detailed in David G. Myers's authoritative tome "The American Paradox: Spiritual Hunger in an Age of Plenty," Illinois psychologist David Duncan randomly selected 50 pornographic movies from a local video store, and broke them down by scene. The average movie contained 18 scenes, 20 percent of which contained violence and 30 percent of which contained "acts of degradation."

On the Internet, things are even more extreme. A search for "sex + toys + torture" in Google yielded 4.85 million results. Journalist Lila Rajiva and academic Susan L. Brison are just two of many to have noted that a large number of the pictures that were flashed round the world from American-run prisons in Iraq were virtually indistinguishable from hardcore pornography, a fact that has not been lost on many commentators in the United States, from Rush Limbaugh to Frank Rich of The New York Times.

A Denmark-based sex site vaunts pages with titles like "needle torture," "pregnant bondage" and "drunk from the toilet"; a favorable review of products available from UK high street sex shop chain Ann Summers observes that "some of them look like instruments of torture...some of them are." In a relatively recent issue (Dec. 15-22, 2004), Time Out, a London listings and lifestyle magazine, enthused about the latest sexual practices going on in the suburbs of Britain's biggest city, including the rubbing of thorns into genitalia, the insertion of pre-freezed human feces into the anus and other similar trends whose relation to torture seems much stronger than to sex as conventionally understood by most people.

Thirdly, there has been a substantial shift in women's perceptions of self as a result of pornography: increasingly, they are unhappy with their most obviously female biological features, and are resorting to plastic surgery to change them. Breast augmentation is now the third most common surgical operation in the United States, with 291,000 operations carried out in 2005, despite concerns over the safety of such procedures; in the United Kingdom, the number of breast enlargement operations carried out rose by 51.4 percent in one year to 5,655 in 2005.

There has been a pronounced rise in the number of surgical interventions in the labial region, too: the hunt for the so-called "designer vagina" has been almost entirely fueled by pornography, as a specialist in this area, Dr Ronald Blatt, medical director of the Manhattan Centre for Vaginal Surgery, matter-of-factly explained to MSNBC.com in June 2005: "People have suggested that they've looked at Playboy or Penthouse...They come in and say, 'Make it look like that.'"

This reflects a frightening level of insecurity amongst women about some of the most essential parts of their being, but it is a result that is not surprising given the results of another study by Texas A&M researcher Wendy Stock (1995). In a survey of 500 women who had recently viewed pornography, 42 percent said they felt bad about their bodies, 33 percent said that they felt sexually inadequate and 25 percent viewed sex as if it was a performance.

Fourthly, sex has been sped up beyond all recognition. An oft-quoted mid-1990s paper by Hans Bernd-Brosius found that sex in pornograhic movies of the 1980s generally lasted around five and a half minutes from first touch to graphic orgasm. In the era of the Internet and mobile telephony, porn has reduced sex to clip-size, something to be downloaded from server to wireless device, increasingly on the move: McSex.

This is not just unrealistic, but again, fatal to women's sexual fulfillment. As most cultures around the world have long known, the overwhelming majority of women thrive on sex that is focused, gentle and replete with physical and verbal stimulation, including kissing, caressing and conversation. In many Eastern cultures, including Hindu, Japanese and Islamic, foreplay - yes, that word - is not just recommended: it is a religious requirement. But pornography is turning thoughtful, loving intercourse into an historical curiosity.

Given all this, the fifth consequence of the massive and unprecedented pornographization of the developed world does not come as too much of a shock: there is a lot less of the real article about. We live, as the Swedish academics Jonas Ridderstrale and Kjell Nordstrom have acerbically summarized, in an era in which Viagra is literally more valuable than gold: the drug for men who cannot otherwise get an erection costs $11,766 per pound, while gold is a merely $4,827 (at 2000 prices). The Guardian (23 April 2006) reports that a new generation of drugs, due to hit world markets in three years, promises not just sexual arousal, but a feeling of eagerness and enthusiasm about sex; apparently, this too is something that now needs to be manufactured.

In fact, those doing research in this area cannot fail to notice the glut of surveys which report almost uniformly that people are not interested in sex: they are too tired, disillusioned and insecure about sex to enjoy it. And many of these people are now coalescing into what is a very new social category: that of the "asexual." Asexuality - the condition was the subject of an October 2004 edition of New Scientist - is where an affected person feels no inclination to interact sexually. With anyone. Ever. And if that sounds extreme, then it should be noted that asexuals have come from nowhere to occupy their own distinct and growing place in the sexual continuum: estimates in the United Kingdom and the United States show that between 1 percent and 3 percent of the population is now asexual.

In his much-misunderstood tome, "The End of History and the Last Man," Francis Fukuyama recounts that Alexandre Kojeve, whom Fukuyama regards as Hegel's greatest interpreter of the 20th century, believed that once humankind had reached the promised land of material satisfaction, they would essentially revert to a stage of animality, where they "would indulge in love like adult beasts." Thanks to porn, it would appear that we have surpassed this stage. Modern sex is increasingly coercive, violent, demeaning and empty. And for this, all of us - men and women - are paying a scarcely imaginable price.

some thoughts 04.May.2006 22:41

a person who has some thoughts

I would agree with a few pieces of this article (that pornography and some (not all of, just some) associated sex practices and some of the pressures people may face may not be healthy (but then I am only speculating because our society has yet to discover what healthy expressions of sexuality are), but I fundamentally disagree that pornography is the problem. Pornography is just a symptom of a more fundamental illness: the repression, judgement, and shaming of our sexuality and our bodies in our culture.

What I have to say are generalized observations. There is so much diversity that it is hard to say anything about sexuality that applies to all, so keep that in mind....

Our sexuality is a powerful and personal force within us. We focus a lot of energy there. It is intimately associated with our being.

Our bodies are also powerful aspects of ourselves. It is right there. We deal with it all the time. It is a form of physical bridge between our inner personal selves and the outer world we interact in.

Yet in our culture, our sexuality, and our bodies have been made to be shamed and judged. We hide them. We wear clothes. We close the door to the bathroom when using the toilet. We hide our sexual fantasies because we have been taught that they are shameful. We are taught that we must be "normal", whatever that is, or else we are shamed. We are also taught to strongly associated our bodies with our sexuality.

I feel that these cultural treatements of our bodies, and our sexuality (two different but often associated things) are the root of many of the problems you speak of. Men judge women's bodies so strongly because we don't see them, yet we find them very interesting because we are sexual beings. It is normal for us to develop exaggerated expectations of what we do not see. For example, if a woman is perceived as generally attractive, our kinky little minds fantasize that those parts of her body we do not see are the most succulent, delicious, absolutely yummiest beyond comprehension objects that we can ever experience tasting and touching and feeling and merging with. On the other hand, if she is seen as "unattractive", we will imagine those parts of her body to be disgusting, stinky, awful, horrible. This is normal human behavior under these circumstances. Just think about other examples (not necessarily sexual) where there is something rumored about: people develop crazy expectations that increasingly exaggerate their expectations. If something is rumored to not be so great (yet it is held in mystery), people will spread increasingly negative rumors about it, for example. If something is rumored to be great, it will be increasingly exaggerated as a magical wonderful amazing solution to whatever it is suppose to be for.

I don't fully understand rape. This is just my theory and I suggest others contribute their thoughts as well. No one who has experienced it has shared their experience with me, so I look out in the culture, think about it, and come to my own personal conclusions. But I believe it goes like this. Our culture has so incredibly privatized our bodies. Only very special, priviledged people are allowed to see our touch us in the most personal ways (especially charged for women). So, the rapist --an angry being-- is thinking along the lines of "I am going to really get you in a way that pierces through to the core of your being!!!" "I am going to show you -***I***- am in control!!!!!" And our culture has set up that invading her body is the ultimate act of invasive, dehumanizing control. And further, because our culture has so shamed our bodies, and we have developed such an intense insecurity around our bodies and our sexuality, rape has been charged to be an especially powerful form of personal attack. If our culture lacked this shame and judgement of our bodies and our sexuality, then (a)- potential rapists would be less motivated to do this, (b)- the magnitude of personal assault would be less (no, I am not saying it would be ok or not hurtful, just that the intensity of the personal harm would be to some degree not as powerful), and (c)- potential victims would be more comfortable and prepared to handle it and protect themselves from such an attack.

I believe that the shame and judgement of our bodies and our sexuality has caused a lot of harm in our culture, that it forces people to hide and repress significant portions of who they are. Something within us yearns to come out and say "I am here!!!!". Modern technologies have made pornography and some forms of sexual expression more easily available that may not necessarily be healthy (I am reluctant to pass too much judgement here, but some of it seems not the healthiest expression of ourselves). But I believe this is because that part of our inner being is screaming "LET ME OUT!!!!". It knows that it is sexual in nature, and pornography is something our culture has developed associated with getting our sexuality out, but this part of our being hasn't fully discovered just what it is yet because it has been living in suppression.

Now, imagine if we lived in a culture that was very different. We did not tie our bodies and our sexuality together. We have bodies, and we have varying forms of sexuality that often involves our bodies, but they are not in and of the same. Imagine if nudity was normal and commonplace (e.g. if the weather is really nice, you might just go to work naked). Imagine if bathrooms did not have locks on the doors, public restrooms were not marked "men" and "women" but "people", and that we never learned that anything we do in there is shameful, unmodest, or otherwise to be hidden.

Also imagine if our sexuality was open and non-judged. Children were not scolded when they touch themselves or each other. People masturbate in the park. People have sex in the park. Children see this and develop an understanding of the human-ness of sexuality so that when they become sexual beings themselves it is not a "wierd" or embarrasing thing left to privacy and crude jokes with their peers, but something they understand and can comfortably deal with, and have support from their parents and community as they discover this part of themselves and continue to grow up, rather than privatizing it to such a stress-inducing extreme that we do when we become horny teenagers. People openly express their unique sexual thoughts and feelings because there is nothing in our culture that would shame or negatively judge one for having sexual thoughts that were not "normal".

I think if our world was like this, we would have a much more holistic and healthy community. People would see more of the divine human-ness in each other. We would relate and connect on another level, understanding and seeing the human-ness in each other. The pressures you have described that are especially connected with women (judgement/expectations of their bodies, strong association with sexuality at the cost of their whole human-ness, etc.) would be significantly reduced. Rape would be virtually unheard of. Humans would have a more natural association of supporting one another, because we would "see" each other more.

And, back to pornography, there would be less pornography (except perhaps other more highly developed forms that are more nourishing to our beings; we have so suffocated our sexual development in judgement and shame that it is difficult to fathom just what healthy sexuality might be). People would understand their sexuality more. They would strive for healthy, most nourishing expressions of their sexuality and their relationships. We wouldn't be inserting frozen feces in our anuses (unless, through more advanced sexual development, we discovered something good about this that I currently do not understand). It would be more difficult to view Iraqi people as disposable lesser or inferior beings that we can just casually kill off by the thousands.

So as far as I'm concerned, regarding pornography and other aspects of sexuality mentioned on the above article that we assume are not the most healthy forms of sexuality: great! Let it out! Let people stick that frozen poop in their anuses! This is the first stage in a process that, I believe, will lead to new levels of discovery and enrichement that may not be expressed in its current form. If we let porn go free, people will get bored with it. But then we will have been so exposed to sex in the community that it would be hard to push it back under the rug. People will start asking questions of themselves. They will be more use to letting their "kinky" parts out. They will discover parts of themselves. This will lead to greater things.

No, I am not an expert on anything. I am just a person who has some thoughts, and these are my some of thoughts on this matter. I hope this serves as some fuel to get others to express their thoughts on the matter, regardless of whether they agree with anything I say or think I am the most insane being on earth.

What if...? 05.May.2006 09:44

Well Adjusted Female

So, what if suddenly overnight, women just said, "right, we'll stop dieting, stop believing the advertisers, fashion and body fascists (directly influenced by porn), stop wearing dental-floss and band-aids, stop being a slave to the gym, stop saving our (less than male average) hard-eaned salaries for that longed-for breast enlargement, stop trying to be sex-on-legs all the time and stop looking at what men are looking at and trying to be that?"

What if they just wore nice comfortable clothes like men do, de-sexualized themselves (without losing femininity of course - this is a confusing point for many - you can be feminine without looking like a slut.) What if they stopped believing that looking like a porn star will liberate them and help keep a man?

What if little girls stopped being visually bombarded from day one with images of perfection - not good enought to be thin, you have to have the perfect hair, flawless skin, long legs, pert boobs, immaculate nails, NO bodily imperfections, no body hair, straight teeth, look like Britney, Christina blah blah.

Well, men would still look at the porn-standard images and guess what? They would expect women to conform. And women would feel pressured.

Can't you selfish men understand how destructive porn's influence is? Can't you just sacrifice some of your penis-stimulating crap to help make the world a better place for women, children, love, humanity and just plain goodness?

Pink has started something - Stupid Girls is right - the video is great. Someone should write a song called "Stupid Men".

Well-Adjusted Sex Writer Disagrees 05.May.2006 10:03

Darklady darklady@darklady.com

I haven't had a chance to completely wake up this morning... another morning which will begin with my drinking water, eating an apple, and writer five reviews to go with the five porn videos I watched yesterday... so I can't really deconstruct this oft-repeated litany of supposed sins associated with porn.

However, I would like to point out that it's not pornographers who are building battle plans for attacking Iran. It wasn't pornographers who planned the attack of Iraq. It wasn't pornographers who flew airplanes into buildings and fields on 9-11. It isn't pornographers splashing acid on their women in response to their possibly having been seen by a man they aren't related to. It's not pornographers who are removing the labia and clitorus of young girls. It's not pornographers beating up gays and transsexuals. It's not pornographers who have built an economy on paying women less than men.

I could go on, but I'm going to assume that those of you who are open to a different point of view "get" what I'm saying.

While it serves some agendas to blame pornography for all manner of real and imagined ill, it don't make it so. While it serves some agendas to insist that all pornography features impossibly "beautiful" women, it don't make it so. While it serves some agendas to jump into the ice cold bed of the Right Wing while smelling of patchouli and curry, it don't make those views valid.

There are areas of the adult industry -- which I have worked in for more than a decade -- which need adjustment... just like any other business. And there are videos that make me extremely uncomfortable -- but they aren't defined by whether there's BDSM activity involved (which is what the writer above seems so upset about). But the solution to our social ills does not exist in the institutionalized victimization of women by the Left or the Right Wing. It does not exist in the condemnation of a huge industry slam packed with diversity -- especially by people who know nothing about it except that they feel uncomfortable about some aspects of it.

Nothing that the writer claims above can be supported by actual evidence. Porn didn't invent rape, it didn't invent sexism, it didn't invent insecurity, and it didn't invent the fact that even the youngest of girls is judged on her appearance before anything else.

And, finally, I would take it as a person favor (as, I suspect, would millions of other women) if other people would stop telling me what I prefer sexually, especially when it uses a big ignorant understanding of pornography, human nature, and psychology in order to back itself up. Just because 1) you haven't seen enough porn to realize that there's kissing and snuggling and "foreplay" and caressing and conversation doesn't mean it doesn't exist. And just because 2) many women AND men enjoy those things doesn't mean we can't also like to have our hair pulled, out butts slapped, our wrists held to the bed (or against the wall or...), and a cock up our ass once in a while.

If anyone wants to learn more about how to make porn a balanced part of your life, they're free to contact me. And anyone looking to add more porn to their library might want to attend one of my big, sex-positive parties since I had out many DVDs. Somehow, in spite of all that porn, my guests kiss, hug, snuggle, make emotional connections, engage in "foreplay," sometimes get tied up, flogged, pierced with needles, and continue to lead emotionally fulfilling lives where sex in many of its wonderful flavors is celebrated and enjoyed with increasingly minimal amounts of guilt.


Cause, Effect, and History 05.May.2006 12:49

Female Student of Psychology erishkiegal@aol.com

The very first thing I would like to point out is that co-occurrence does not always indicate causality. While the increase in pornography does mirror the increase in other ills one could also notice that less plausibly causative occurrences such as increased gas prices, an increase in the average American's expendable income, cultural globalization, increased population, or something as improbably related as the ongoing drought in the Dakotas, could also be said to have occurred along with the rise in current sexual image standards for women and the prevalence of violent sexual practices. Sharing a moment in time, however, does not make these things the cause. It is worth noting, as Darklady mentioned, that it is more than possible for the increase in pornography, sexual violence, heightened occurrences of surgical body modification in America, and what the author of the above article perceives to be the abnormally high sexualization of Western Culture, are all caused by confounding variables that we are unaware of. This is why it is difficult to form an experiment of any statistical significance outside of the laboratory; confounding variables abound and cause and effect can never be satisfactorily established.
It could further be debated that none of these trends are new or unusual. The practice of violent sexual activities is ancient and, if one wants a well-documented account of historical sexual torture that far exceeds most modern practices, one needs only study some of the accounts of the Roman royal orgies during the time of Caligula, or take note of some of the barbarisms performed in the Coliseum; not all of which where reserved for armored men engaged in fair combat. I will not cite the indignities perpetrated upon slaves and Christians here, as they are extreme and disturbing, but suffice it to say that those acts listed in the article, while bizarre to some, are mild in comparison and at least consensual in nature.
As for rape, it can hardly be argued that rape is new. Humanity was likely committing rape before it discovered the use of tools (any person familiar with the behaviors of chimpanzees will understand where this notion comes from) and to try to blame it on something as recent as pornography is not only ridiculous but intellectually insulting.
Extreme body modification for the purpose of sexual desirability is also nothing new under the sun. The only new development is that now women are undergoing their cosmetic alterations under the scalpel in relatively sterile environments. A good and fairly recent example of a time when women were expected to modify their bodies and appear always sexually available (and yet, oddly, expected to always be "chaste" and "pure") would be Elizabethan era Europe. Women strapped themselves into corsets so tightly that their lower ribs would reconfigure themselves and force the internal organs to rearrange in order to accommodate this painful restriction. They were powdered and primped and bewigged and bejeweled on shoes that could be better called stilts. Paraded for male eyes they were expected to blush and faint with complete modesty and pliability whenever a male made advances on them. If they were sold to a husband they were expected to make themselves sexually available to him whenever he chose but refrain at all other times. Then, of course, there are the rather extreme practices of clitorectimies practiced in some countries that go beyond beauty modification into the realm of branding and disfiguring for the purpose of control and ownership. I doubt this practice arose as the result of pornography. Many native cultures also underwent extreme tattooing, both male and female, that was supposed to make the individual more desirable to a mate. Necks have been stretched, lips extended, ears pierced, noses pierced, hell everything's been pierced. Both men and women have undergone painful rituals of scarification and mutilation in order to prove their worth as a potential mate. Plastic surgery is simply a new variation in a very old game. It should also be noted that while a large portion of pornography conforms to the dominant ideal of beauty in our culture much of it does not. There are an overwhelming number of sites devoted to "large" girls and women with small breasts or copious body hair. If you can think of a body type, or a physical characteristic, chances are that out there, somewhere, there is a site strictly devoted to folks who find that characteristic attractive. So, while one could use porn as a way to marginalize and find fault in his/herself one can also use it as a reassurance that there are enough people specifically attracted to whatever socially dictated "flaw" one is insecure about to merit a site devoted to it. In simpler terms: whatever your shape or size there are people who think that's sexy.
Now, when I watch the average pornographic movie I do feel somewhat ill at ease. It frequently does represent a very shallow and strictly physical interaction in which the female participant is mostly acting while the male takes at least some amount of pleasure. I generally don't find the participants or the scenarios particularly attractive and am frequently more inclined to laughter than arousal with occasional interjections of nausea. It seems to me very unlikely, however, that the pornography itself is the originating cause of its own shortcomings. Porn is what the consumers make of it. If this sort of film did not sell then it would cease to exist. There is a growing market of individuals who seek representations of brief, physical interactions between uninvolved partners and I doubt that removing the product will remove the demand or the need that fuels it. It is more important to my mind to understand why representations of such shallow interaction are generally preferred over deeper and more intimate intercourse. Is it a sign of a cultural tendency towards discomfort with intimacy? Is it to keep the viewer from becoming too emotionally attached to the characters on screen so s/he doesn't feel like s/he's "cheating" or somehow being "soiled" by the acts observed? I do not know the answer to this question but believe it merits further study.
Lastly it should be noted that I believe very strongly in personal freedom. I decide what I do with my body, my mind, and my time so long as what I do does not directly harm others. Legal pornography does not directly harm anybody. Our culture has put a number of hurdles in front of it to insure nobody sees any explicit imagery unless they desire to. I still have free will and I make my choice to either conform to the social standards of beauty or not. This choice, as all others, comes with consequences either way. I choose whether words and the desire of another are enough to pressure me into sex I do not wish to have. I choose whether or not I wish to be promiscuous or asexual or anywhere in-between (though I may not be able to choose my body's sexual drive). I choose whether or not I desire to watch porn, make porn, emulate porn, or avoid porn. I choose whether I raise my children with a focus on inherent self worth or conformity to external expectation and whether I involve myself in their life and help them question the stimulus they are exposed to or allow the television to play nanny. These are my personal responsibilities as well as my personal right and I, not pornographers or any other external force, make those decisions and bear responsibility for their consequences.
Thank you for your time

The naturalness of porn 05.May.2006 14:31

CoolAunt

"It knows that it is sexual in nature, and pornography is something our culture has developed associated with getting our sexuality out, but this part of our being hasn't fully discovered just what it is yet because it has been living in suppression." Yes, waking to porn is only natural. I'll share with you a response I read elsewhere. Not only is it true, it's quite humorous as well. Hear, hear. And when I see the word "natural" attached to this whole, tired argument and I just can't help but laugh... "Natural". Like squatting out our offspring in the dirt with barely a pause in our constant foraging for edible roots and tubers... And foregoing any sparkin', spoonin', romance or even foreplay and just jumpin' and humpin', wild and nasty on any potential donor of complimentary genetic material that smells right and will hold fairly still for the duration. Not to mention having our bowels and bladders let spray whenever and wherever we happen to stand - 'cause that's how we're built. Yay "Nature". If it's "natural" - well, it must be good for you. And this whole "porn" thing? Oh, sad ladies - this entire misunderstanding is just the result of the genetic coding and hereditary tendencies of the male of the species... Don't take all that slobbering and leering to mean that their *own* women are any less adored and cherished... these poor products of nature (and - dare I say - modern media?) are simply more "visually" oriented. And, of course, by "oriented" I mean "hopelessly enslaved". Happily, some of us have had opportunity to evolve. And while evolution doesn't preclude us from wanting to see butts and boobs and other fleshy delights it does present us with a desire to acknowledge the human being inside those attributes. So we do odd, "un-natural" things like establish verbal communication, which leads to a repoire. We develop attraction, build trust, maybe even throw in a little mutual respect and consideration. There's a mind and a heart and a lifetime of stories there. We earn our admittance to a total experience. Otherwise we really aren't *entitled* to share those erotic treasures. Consider all the "natural" tendencies and behaviors we've been able to expand beyond -(y'know, this whizzing on our own feet,eating raw carrion,praying to the sun, cringing at thunder,sleeping in the dirt, etc.- although some try and fight the forward motion at even the slightest hint of any inconvenient prohibition...) and then explain to me how slapping an open porno mag on your girlfriend's back mid-screw,or twitching and moaning over "Girls Gone Drunk and Stupid" and then rolling playfully ("Tah-DAH!" over onto your sleeping wife doesn't relegate either of them to the simple and pathetic status of *hand towel-with t!ts*. No hard feelings, though. It's "nature". Oh, pulllleeeeeeeeeeeeze! How "natural" is it,really, to take the greatest mental,spiritual and physical bonding experience two human souls can have and water it down with a pay-per-view interlude of some anonymous actresses' wooden dialog, fake tits and scripted moans? "Natural". Like living in trees and eating bugs if you can't promptly nail a gazelle in the skull with your rawhide slingshot. Or "natural" like wanking away to the combined efforts of three producers,two directors,four writers,five cameras,nine personal assistants,a score of financial backers,a cast of twelve (including the mule) and a sordid assortment of makeup artists,wardrobe consultants,set builders,dialog coaches, foley artists,fluffers,gaffers,editors,union reps, caterers and someone from legal, and either airbrushed, retouched,color corrected and glossy printed into magazine format duped flawlessly among thousands of other copies on VHS or DVD and shipped to your friendly,neighborhood adult entertainment emporium or streaming across 2,000 or so miles of coaxial cable twined neatly and at roughly the speed of light into your plasma TV or personal PC? Oh well - whatthehell ever... Let's see where we're at in another million years or so. As to "visual" stimulation; try having sex with a significant other while LOOKING at him or her. Or go yank off in private with an eye chart.

end of sex no problem 05.May.2006 21:03

malthus

the last thing this planet needs is more human babies; so reduced libido and fertility are intrinsically good and meantime there is a flood of humanity migrating to the "good life"...with ever more traffic and
"45awl...+

make your own porn 05.May.2006 22:47

beast info@porn-off.com

I appreciate all this debate about porn. I think it's good for all of us to continue to think critically about pornography and its role in our culture.

Those of you who think you CAN make non-commercial, creative, liberating pornography, please submit it to the PORN OFF. Join the porn dialouge, participate in a grassroots community event by showing your indepedent porn and viewing others' films too at a private screening!

www.porn-off.com


More about the PORN-OFF! 05.May.2006 22:57

Squirrelly info@porn-off.com

The website is still under construction, and a more diverse set of images should be up in the next week or so to reflect a full spectrum of body types and gender expressions. : )

Here is a full statement of what we are about.

xoxo,
Squirrelly


PORN-OFF MISSION STATEMENT:

"The Portland Organization for Radical Naughtiness On Film Fest (PORN-OFF) is an opportunity for amateur filmmakers to showcase their erotic films in a private screening event. We are dedicated to challenging the mainstream perspective of porn as commercialized sexuality; we support its creation as a non-commercial art form that empowers us in our bodies and honors the diversity of each person's unique erotic expression. The PORN-OFF welcomes adult participants of all ages, sexual orientations, ethnicities, gender identities, abilities, lifestyles, and backgrounds. We intend to provide a safe space to share and celebrate all kinds of sexuality on film, manifest a supportive community, and have a fabulously delicious time!"


The PORN-OFF is a special event that showcases the work of independent erotic filmmakers and brings diverse porn-enthusiasts together to meet, create community, and celebrate the joy of sex on the video screen--all in an atmosphere free from the commercialization, commodification, and oppression of our diverse and beautiful sexualities by the pressures of mainstream porn production.

We hope to bring together a collection of short films that have been created for private viewing and sharing among friends and lovers, not for sale and profit. These films will be reviewed by the members of our collective, and those that comply with our Submission Guidelines will be entered into our event submission pool.

All approved applicants (including cast, crew, and anyone who directly contributed to the making of a film) will be invited to attend our Private Screening Party where participants will have a chance to meet and celebrate each other's creativity, passion, and sexiness.

No films will be in any way reproduced or screened outside the event except with the express permission of the filmmakers, and all submissions will be returned to applicants after the event unless they desire to archive their film in the PORN-OFF film archive.

No film will ever be commercially sold, and in fact any film that has in any way been sold or generated a financial profit will be barred from entry to our event. We want to build a community of empowered artists and passionate porn-lovers that are able to manifest their pleasure apart from the realm of consumer porn.

So what are you waiting for? Pull out your video camera and send us your submissions today!

www.porn-off.com
 info@porn-off.com


The Penetration Cause is still Colonial-Racist 06.May.2006 01:28

Queers against Heterosexism

This debate occures another equalization of what is called violent penetration for a psychosis trauma of the white society in anchor modern times to make wander capital, for the penetraitor: the white Hetero, domained with a lot of analyses in fascist marketing offensives of preparing Ghetto's for infantilistic-libidinal sexist structures of the militant-left, will arbitrait the porn into a phenomenon of still believing in acts of bitterment the snapshot to bolster asexuality....


Don't Want it in my Life 06.May.2006 04:02

Seen Too Much

"However, I would like to point out that it's not pornographers who are building battle plans for attacking Iran. It wasn't pornographers who planned the attack of Iraq. It wasn't pornographers who flew airplanes into buildings and fields on 9-11. It isn't pornographers splashing acid on their women in response to their possibly having been seen by a man they aren't related to. It's not pornographers who are removing the labia and clitorus of young girls. It's not pornographers beating up gays and transsexuals. It's not pornographers who have built an economy on paying women less than men."

I think you will find that many of those men in fact do use porn. Why does the war in Iraq always seem to come into a discussion about anything? Porn is just another way of terrorising women. All of the analytical academics cannot logically deny this. Even if not, does all the aforementioned evil make porn right? It's funny, many women who say they are pro-porn and personal choice invariably say at some point that certain aspects or types of porn make them uncomfortable.

"It does not exist in the condemnation of a huge industry slam packed with diversity -- especially by people who know nothing about it except that they feel uncomfortable about some aspects of it."

Wrong again. I am not right-wing, I have no religious affiliations. I have been involved in many aspects of the "adult" industry, have also been a victim of extreme male violence and I am qualified up to my eyeballs to comment. What concerns me these days is the absolutely nowhere-to-hide prevalence of porn. It is sexualising children which is wrong, wrong. Wrong.

Where is the message saying "it's ok to not be sexy, it's ok to not have sex"? The original article basically is saying that many people are now just so fed up with the over-sexualization of society that they are opting out.

Yes we all have a sexual aspect to our being, but we also have an emotional side that goes with that and porn does not address this at all, in fact it is de-humanizing.

I personally have heard stories of women who became so ashamed of their bodies (they and partners used porn) that they did stop having sex. Ok, blame the women again. One of the above writes says that if you look, you can find all sorts of other body images that are desirable. That's just it - it's not obvious, it's not on the magazine covers, and you have to search it out as an almost freak fetish, and just another item on the flesh menu. I have known many men who use porn who are not ok and do want that "porn-standard" look. Trust me. I know many women who feel pressured into conforming. It's a problem and it's not going to go away.

less sex no problem 06.May.2006 20:41

malthus

the last thing this planet needs is more human babies; so reduced libido and fertility are intrinsically good and meantime there is a flood of humanity migrating to the "good life"...with ever more traffic and sprawl in the concrete jungles and oil wars to be fought to keep it up.

let's not mix this up with "down with the sodomites" hysteria 06.May.2006 22:40

thank you

> Moreover, women are increasingly expected to agree to practices - such as anal sex and faux
> lesbianism -which the vast majority of them find of no pleasure or even profoundly repulsive.

I don't see that the author -- apparently a man of Middle Eastern descent, not necessarily participant in a culture with particularly enlightened or even factually accurate attitudes about women -- has presented any credentials leading readers to accept him as an authority on what "the vast majority of women" find pleasurable or repulsive.

Pro-porn, Pro-Profit 07.May.2006 02:16

Seen too Much

"Nothing that the writer claims above can be supported by actual evidence. Porn didn't invent rape, it didn't invent sexism, it didn't invent insecurity, and it didn't invent the fact that even the youngest of girls is judged on her appearance before anything else."

I have evidence - I have spoken to many women, I am a woman who has lived with violent rape and it's resulting trauma, sexism, insecurity and I see every day the early indoctrination of very young girls into the world of porn, just by going about their daily lives i.e., seeing the covers of men's (and women's now) magazines, the articles in little girls magazines that are full of "sex education and advice columns". Surely, you cannot think this is ok?

No, porn may not have invented the issues you mention, but it is not addressing them either, it's making them far worse because it is so in-your-face. It's influence has exploded over the last few years due to technology.

I take it that you make a profit from your CDs and DVDs and sex parties (yes I have been to sex parties too and found them sad and depressing) so you are not going to criticise porn. I too was like this at one time. I thought "if you can't beat them, join them" and tried to be ok with porn. It's just EASIER as a woman (and probably as a man too) to NOT fight and NOT argue about porn. It's easier not to be criticised as going against the flow and trying to fight men. It takes courage to speak out.


The porn makers are trying to infiltrate all aspects of media and brainwash women into actually thinking that they are to be what porn wants them to be. Not only that, but they are to call themselves liberated and enlightened. This is one of the biggest cons to be perpetuated I think the world has ever seen. But we are not all buying it by any means.

Go on keep making your money and being a part of the problem, and not the solution. Keep lying to yourself. I did it. Maybe you will have a wake-up call one day, or maybe, like me, you will have a slow realization that now, when it's been affecting children, it's time to say enough is enough.

>Moreover, women are increasingly expected to agree to practices - such as anal sex and faux
> lesbianism -which the vast majority of them find of no pleasure or even profoundly repulsive. "

"I don't see that the author -- apparently a man of Middle Eastern descent, not necessarily participant in a culture with particularly enlightened or even factually accurate attitudes about women -- has presented any credentials leading readers to accept him as an authority on what "the vast majority of women" find pleasurable or repulsive."

Again, I am a woman, I have spoken to other women, some who feel that they have no right but to go along with men's requests, and I know that many women fake being bi-sexual for the man's pleasure and also to be talked into anal sex. I have had nothing but bad things to say about anal sex - I don't like it, it has caused infection every time I've tried it, it hurts and I just say no now- also, it's not natural for a woman for a start, because women do not have a prostate. Many men think mistakenly that a woman will have the same sensations from anal sex but, no prostate, no pleasure. So, ironically, it's men who are more pleasured by anal, hence gay men liking this. A lot of men selfishly just want to use the anal hole as it's tighter, and they don't necessarily care about the risks of infection or any lack of pleasure to the woman. The woman thinks that she must be seen to enjoy it, and the lie is perpetuated even more.

As for the faux lesbianism, that is also true. If you look at a lot of escort ads, many of them claim to be bisexual just to make money, but they are not truly this way, they just want the money. Doesn't take Einstein to work all of this out. So, women in relationships will feel insecure that their man will go elsewhere to satisfy the curiosity awakened by what he has seen on the internet (he will probably do it anyway), and so give in. Society has fostered a lot of sexual slavery in women. Again, don't need to call Einstein to see this.

Anyway, back to the point of the article, it seems to me that in some respects the answer for many women, and for them to feel they are not being ripped-off emotionally and physically is either to charge a lot of money for sex, or forego it altogether. I for one am sick of the saturation and the pornification of culture.

Porn is for those without mature feelings... 07.May.2006 08:12

Pravda or Consequences

Porn is sex without commitment. It is recreation.

Therefore it has no real human value because it does not inspire valid solutions for real human pain and suffering.

There are sex therapists for those who need it, but porn will never be a healthy outlet because it ignores the importance of love and how that builds and connects society.

Brick Wall, This is Reason, Can We Talk? 07.May.2006 11:05

Darklady darklady@darklady.com

"Nothing that the writer claims above can be supported by actual evidence. Porn didn't invent rape, it didn't invent sexism, it didn't invent insecurity, and it didn't invent the fact that even the youngest of girls is judged on her appearance before anything else."

I have evidence - I have spoken to many women, I am a woman who has lived with violent rape and it's resulting trauma, sexism, insecurity and I see every day the early indoctrination of very young girls into the world of porn, just by going about their daily lives i.e., seeing the covers of men's (and women's now) magazines, the articles in little girls magazines that are full of "sex education and advice columns". Surely, you cannot think this is ok?

Having been the object of violence does not make you an expert on pornography. It makes you an expert on your experience. And that means all of the women you've spoken with. I've been raped, too. And I was pretty abused as a kid. None of it had to do with porn. It had to do with control.

The anti-male attitude of the anti-porn message on this board is ghastly to read.

No, porn may not have invented the issues you mention, but it is not addressing them either, it's making them far worse because it is so in-your-face. It's influence has exploded over the last few years due to technology.

1) Why is it porn's job to address acts of violence that have nothing to do with it? When did porn suddenly become the Big Brother of the Western World and inherit the responsibility of everyone who refuses to behave properly to one another? These are thing parents are supposed to be teaching their kids.

2) I'm far more offended by the copious amounts of religious propoganda that arrives in my Inbox than I am by the porn. And there are filters that mature, responsible adults can use to limit what gets to them online. But many adults would rather wring their hands and play the eternal victim than take responsibility for their lives. It's always somebody else's fault, isn't it?

I take it that you make a profit from your CDs and DVDs and sex parties (yes I have been to sex parties too and found them sad and depressing) so you are not going to criticise porn. I too was like this at one time. I thought "if you can't beat them, join them" and tried to be ok with porn. It's just EASIER as a woman (and probably as a man too) to NOT fight and NOT argue about porn. It's easier not to be criticised as going against the flow and trying to fight men. It takes courage to speak out.


Having been to "sex parties" isn't the same as having been to MY sex parties any more than having had a relationship with a woman is the same as having had a relationship with me or any other woman you've never been involved with. I've been to some pretty sad sex parties, too. That's why I started hosting my own. Well, that and the fact that I found out people were having sex at my parties even before they were sex parties...

Yes, I am a professional writing about sex, which includes porn. I imagine you have a job... or maybe you're just letting me support you with my tax dollars. Either way, I'm very comfortable with what I do for a living. Saying that I won't "criticise porn" since I work in the industry just shows how utterly unqualified you are to speak on this subject. You have no objectivity, only tons of unresolved issues. I am plenty critical of things I believe need to be changed. But that doesn't mean that I agree with you.

I'm sorry that you've had such a lack of will and personal identity in the past. That's never been my situation. I have always been a fiercely independent person; it's what kept me alive during years of abuse. I have stood my ground even when that meant I would be struck or insulted. And that means meeting women and men in the sex industry since I had been raised with VERY negative views of it. The more people I met, the more I was able to understand what was going on both on screen and off screen. There are very fucked up people involved with porn... and working at McDonalds, and teaching school, and becoming parents, and working at OHSU, and posting on this board, and everywhere. There are also wonderfully enlightened people doing all of these things, as well. The entertainment industry in general attracts young people who don't have much good sense about taking care of themselves but, because we're a guilt-based society, we single out those who work in sexuality for our scorn and our hostile jealousy.


The porn makers are trying to infiltrate all aspects of media and brainwash women into actually thinking that they are to be what porn wants them to be. Not only that, but they are to call themselves liberated and enlightened. This is one of the biggest cons to be perpetuated I think the world has ever seen. But we are not all buying it by any means.

Bullshit. Pornographers are people like the rest of us and they got their training from the same society that the rest of us got it from. If you want to blame something for messing with our minds, go to religion. And if you believe women are so stupid that pornography has managed to "brainwash" them then you've got a very low opinion of women, indeed. Your obvious issues with sexuality that expands beyond your own is painfully obvious. Your utter refusal to accept that some women DO like some of the things shown on porn is distressing. Your bigotted view that only your opinions can result from enlightenment is representative of what is wrong with the feminist movement when it addresses sexuality. Fortunately, your views are not representative of most modern feminism. And, finally, if "we are not all buying it" then what's your beef?


Go on keep making your money and being a part of the problem, and not the solution. Keep lying to yourself. I did it. Maybe you will have a wake-up call one day, or maybe, like me, you will have a slow realization that now, when it's been affecting children, it's time to say enough is enough.

Don't quit your day job to become a psychic, ok? Cuz you don't know me at all. But then, I don't think you know yourself, either. If you did, why would you feel so compelled to dismiss and belittle me?

BTW -- I just watched an amateur video from Homegrown before breakfast. Fabulous video featuring hirsute women. It dispells all of your claims. Real women really enjoying real sex. If watching a poreless princess from Vivid isn't your style, don't watch her. Pick up something from Filmco or Totally Tasteless or Homegrown or any of the other companies that present real amateurs, real fat women, real 40+ women, real couples, real swingers, or any of the other person-next-door videos that are enormously popular and reflect the realities of everyday people's bodies. I doubt you'll look for these titles, however, because the truth doesn't appear to be what you're looking for. Sob sisters who'll share in your never ending pain seems more your style at this point in your development.


What propmted this author to make these assumptions 07.May.2006 21:56

Miss Happenis

My goodness. Why would the author put together an article with this point of view? One can only wonder.

What does the End of Sex have to do with a billion dollar industry? One person's porn is another person's erotica. It is just people doing a natural act, however some have bad acting or filming.

We are essentially a young nation going through puberty. We have many alternatives for our sexual expression and our appetites are as varied as our menu choices.

More thoughts on this topic please.
Miss Happenis

pornography users know what the real deal is 09.May.2006 11:27

Sam

Why anyone is paying serious attention to the pornography profiteer whose greater income depends on the greater acceptance of fuckumentaries, but this radical leftist trusts the profiteering libertarian absolutist for the fuckumentary industry's opinion on pornography as much as she trusts that other profiteering libertarian absolutist Dick Cheney's opinion on Halliburton.

We're not talking about Iraq, Iran, or 9-11 here, we're talking about pornography's effect on how people are conditioned to respond to sexual stimilus. All bringing up such unrelated abuses of power does is suggest women aren't as important as Iraqis, Iranians, or the people who died in the World Trade Center. Bad things happen in the world, but the bad thing being discussed here is the saturation of pornography into all aspects of our culture and the effects it is having on people's sexual desires, relationships with others, personal body image, and social circumstances.

"Then, of course, there are the rather extreme practices of clitorectimies practiced in some countries that go beyond beauty modification into the realm of branding and disfiguring for the purpose of control and ownership. I doubt this practice arose as the result of pornography."

You doubt the skyrocketing of labiaplastic surgeons and women requesting pussy cosmetic surgery in America has to do with presentation of perfectly tight & trim pussies in pornography? I thinmk a very good case can be made for breast surgery and labioplasty being technologized versions of "beauty modification into the realm of branding and disfiguring for the purpose of control and ownership."

How much clearer than then third most commonly performed surgery in the US being slicing open breasts to sew sacks of chemicals inside that results in loss of actual sexual sensation implants can pornography's effects be? Women are going into doctor's offices with pornography in their hands and asking for their vaginas to be sliced and stitched to make it more visually appealing while suffering loss of sensation. The valuing of sexual looks over sexual performance is a pornographic trope, and women who never felt they had ugly breasts or unsightly vaginas before are increasingly disgusted with themselves as the porn-using men in their lives say they find them less attractive and they measure themselves against surgicalized, airbrushed bodies presented constantly on the Internet, magazine racks, email spam, television, music videos, movies, billboards for lacrosse teams & car washes, strip club flyers on telephone poles, strippercize classes, etc.

"It should also be noted that while a large portion of pornography conforms to the dominant ideal of beauty in our culture much of it does not."

I don't know who you think you're fooling with this, but it ain't those of us who have been pornography users for years. Maybe the trite line "pornography is just pictures of people fucking" would still work on your grandma or someone who think Playboy=pornography, but those of us who know pornography know the line about how "diverse" porn media is to be not an accurate statement regarding this 57,000,000,000 dollar each year global corporate industry. TimeWarnerAOL is the world's largest distibutor of porn and the amount of "hairy leg" or other fetish porn is as significant as a lemonade stand in a Wal-Mart parking lot. As former pornstitute Sharon Mitchell says about the direction pornography has taken, "It's multiple penetrations, it's fisting, it's all about unprotected anal sex. A few people still do vanilla regular sex, but for the most part it's as kinky as they can get and as much as they can push it as possible." Again, to people like myself who used porn for years this is not new news and trying to tell us otherwise makes you lose credibility.

"Porn is what the consumers make of it."

Actually, it's what porn makers make of it as with any media product (the Bush pResidency is what FOX News made of it), but in principle I agree with you. That's why it concerns me when the best-selling porn video of 2004 is "Gag Factor 4" and the most widely viewed porn image on the internet a few years back was of a woman getting a horse's massive cock jammed into her vagina. I'm worried by the perennial popularity of Max Hardore's Cherry Poppers series, wherein men are given step-by-step instructions on how to rape a schoolgirl and get away with it by threatening to show the porn pics taken of her to her friends at school if she tells anyone.

Here's a little taste of Max Hardcore for anyone unfamiliar with the extremely popular pornographer who led the way to the current crop of gonzo humilitainment pornography. This was taken from a review in the leading porn magazine in the world, Adult Video News:

**In this scene, actor-director Hardcore is having rough sex with Cloey Adams, who is pretending to be underage. "If you're a good girl, I'll take you to McDonald's later and gt you a Happy Meal". Hardcore then proceeds to piss in her mouth. Addressing the camera, Cloey Adams says, "What do you think of your little princess now Daddy?" Turning to the crew, he calmly says, "I'll need a speculum and a hose." One of Max's favorite tricks is to stretch a girl's asshole with a speculum then piss into her open gape and make her suck out his piss with a hose.**

"Our culture has put a number of hurdles in front of it to insure nobody sees any explicit imagery unless they desire to."

Oh thanks, I haven't had a belly laugh that good in a while. The Child Online Protection Act failed a few months ago because a judge determined internet porn providers having to confirm the over-18 age of viewers with a credit card was an unfair obstruction to free speech. DO you think verifying the age of internet porn users is unfairly restricting pornographer's rights? The biggest group of Internet porn consumers are aged 12-17 (Boston Globe, 2005).

Here are some quotes by porn-using men in a recent book on the subject, "Pornofied". I know from personal porn use that the emotions and need for ever-increasing stimulus happens with pornography use, and while I know one anecdote is not evidence, a thousand anecdotes is compelling data.

"I used to view porn online , but I began to find it more difficult to to stay aroused when having sex with a real woman." -28 year-old man in email to book's author

"I've noticed the naked images that used to arouse me don't anymore. I found that I was getting numb to basic images, I needed to keep progressing to more explicit stuff." -Dave
"There are times when I've been so utterly bored while having sex with a woman I'll think of porn to hasten things along." -Sandeep

"I find that I look more for women who have the attributes I see in porn. I want bigger breasts, blonder hair, curvier bodies in general. Just better-looking overall." -Harrison

"At first I was happy just to see a naked woman. But as time has gone on, I've grown more accustomed to things. I look for more and more extreme stuff. Seeing women demeaned is somehow a turn-on. Recently I've found that I like to see a guy pissing on a girl. I didn't think I would like it, but I can get into it." -Tyler

Maybe Tyler was born wanting to watch women get pissed on, or maybe helearned to like watching women get pissed on from misogynist men like Max Hardcore, one of the most popular pornographers in the world, putting sexually arousing images directly next to images of peeing onto women in a way that fuses the two together in a masturbating man's mind such that they become synonymous? Ring the bell during mealtime enough and the dog salivates when there is no food, such is conditioned behavior.

Many more quotes can be found for anyone looking at the collected data on men who use pornography and what they really think about it. Our pornified media environment has an effect on us because all media has an effect on us. At first thought maybe seeing porny t&a makes one want to get it on, but after a long day's worth of pornographers, producers, and advertisers screaming hypersexualized messages at our libidos and playing that one note as hard as they can has effects on on, and from the looks of it those effects are damanging intimacy and respect between sexual partners as well as the self-image of girls unable to compete with men's demands for Jenna "two sacks of tit implants" Jameson or Pamela "two sacks of tit implants" Anderson.

I'm in Oregon's medical marijuana program. While marijuana is good for a short-term appetite stimulus, it results in my appetite getting depressed when I'm not smoking. The munchie chemicals that marijuana releases into my brain create a 'coming down' like most drugs because I was not meant to be perpetually hungry and my body compensates for the overstimulated appetite that marijuana brings by swinging the other way when I'm not stoned.

Applied to our extraordinarily pornified culture, I can see a definite case being made that the strong commercialized sexual stimuli advertisers shove at us constantly, firing off the chemicals that sexual arousal does in our bodies the whole day long, makes our bodies compensate for the overstimulation with a depressed appetite afterwards and the need for stronger stimulus once they get acclimated to what's arousing them and it becomes ineffective. I used to be a pornography user who bought videos in Times Square so I know the truth of, "Q. How many videos does the average porn user have in their collection? A. One less than they need."

Voice of Reason to Porn Profiteer 11.May.2006 01:14

Seen too Much

Obviously a few raw nerves were hit with my comments. I did not realise that this would result in a personal attack. You say that I don't know you, then you go on to tell me what I'm all about huh? "Lack of will and personal identity", also "unresolved issues", all because I have seen the negative effects of porn, it's effects, and dare to speak out? But this is usual for pro-porn-profiteers. Don't ever criticise porn. Put all the labels on the person who dares to criticise. Oh, and absolve culture and society - parents must do all the work.

I did not say that porn must be the answer to any problems. I said that it is making them worse.

Disliking porn has nothing to do with insecurity or "hostile jealousy" . Those are old and tired arguments that don't wash. I'm saddened that someone who says that they have experienced rape and abuse, is embracing porn. As I said, I am no stranger to porn and have used it in my life. It's not as if I don't know what I'm talking about. Your comment about my "development" is your view - my view is that you have not developed far enough, indeed it is you who has the unresolved issues. After all, I have used porn. Have you ever tried backing off from porn for awhile, really listening, and have tried to see the bigger picture on porn's effects, and the people who have been damaged as a result of porn? Including children? Until you can speak from both experiences, and are not profiting from porn, I will not accept your views as balanced. And you tell me that being qualified to speak on porn and it's related issues is invalid because I am only an expert in my own experience, then you go on to relate your own experiences as justification for your views.

Calling someone a sob sister who has the guts to stand up against porn is just puerile. Sob sisters are not sobbing they are stating facts. And it's very depressing that you would take the view that the many who have been raped and nearly murdered, do not have the right to express emotion and if they do, they are "sob" sisters. It's disgusting. It's not about blaming someone or not accepting responsibility for yourself - that's bullshit. Oh, but yes, for the want of a better argument, reduce the criticism to playground level and start name-calling. Particularly when someone is critical of something that makes you money. Yes I have rape and violence issues, but it is the experiences I have had that have helped to open my eyes and to search for ways of dealing with these issues. If I had had no experiences, you would say that I have even less evidence to support my views. No win situation, so it's really pointless talking to someone like you. However, I will soldier on... ..

As I said, I am not religious or political, even if I were, these would be separate from my stand on porn.

And again, it's just easier to accept porn and not fight it, particularly when you are making money from it. And as for your "real women having real sex" well good for them. I am a real woman who has real sex, but I'm not going to let anyone film me - yeah, personal choice, but I'm not going to feel guilty or unenlightened for NOT doing it just cuz some jumped-up, self-proclaimed "normal" expert says that I'm sexually and generally fucked-up for not doing it. You have made assumptions about my and me and my sexuality - outrageous - you don't know me either. Again, porn is NOT about sexuality and love.

Your agreement that many sex parties are sad was heartening. (Must make a note - YOUR sex parties are good - others not.) My reaction to my experience (there's that word again) was not to go to more sex parties, but to look inside myself and ask why was I doing this and where was it taking me? At best, it was taking me sideways, but more likely, was just not making me grow as a human being - quite the opposite. It also opened my eyes - sex-for-profit, in whatever form, does not make you learn about love, sexuality or humanity. One thing I did notice about the parties I attended, the men always hugely outnumbered the women. In fact, the men had to pay a lot of money even to attend - the women got in for nearly free, and STILL they were outnumbered.

The real hardcore pro-porners never talk about porn because they know what unspeakable things are now available. Or if they do comment, they say shit like "I like porn, leave me alone" - oh well, good argument, very articulate, that explains it. . The people who do speak say things like "oh well that kind of porn, yes, is unacceptable, I'm talking about such and such porn". These people turn a blind-eye to the darlest depths of porn that is readily available and accessed by more and more users. Go and review some of this type of porn and then tell me you're still on the path of ulitmate enlightenment. There can be no compartmentalization. It is all part of the whole picture.
Denial is a protective mechanism and helps protect us from reality. Read into that what you will.
There are other accusations/hinted insults in your diatribe (that you might be supporting me with your tax dollars, untrue of course, and the tired old issue about parent responsibility, and others) but no time to reply to those and I don't feel the need for justifying my life anyway - after all, we are meant to be commenting on the original article, not using this as a forum. So I'll stop now.

. 11.May.2006 08:24

.

Porn, like anything else that lights up the brain like Times Square during the holidays, should be approached warily. Users of porn, like users of methamphetamine, require more and more and more to get off.

A boyfriend once told me that he thought that porn was addictive- that men who used it often had some pretty screwed up ideas about what women should look like and how they should perform sexually. I thought that this was a pretty astute observation coming from a person who had seen more than his share of hardcore and "vanilla" type stuff.

I'm not saying that pornography needs to be outlawed but I think that some of the posters need to cut the bullshit and admit that porn isn't some great, harmless way to explore sexuality.

re: person who has some thoughts 16.Aug.2006 00:21

susan 28 susan28@susan28.com

just want to express kudos to "person who has some thoughts" for their vision of the world, i've expressed this very thing but always get looked at like i'm nuts, while i view "moral" modesty as nuts and have never really identified with it. the only reason i wear clothes (except in harsh climates) is because i'd get arrested if i didn't, but i'm quite certain that if it wasn't the
"norm" i'd certainly not have dreamt it up.. i took my bathroom door down to paint it about a year ago, and got too lazy to paint it and just threw it away, and had this friend come over once and couldn't pee because there was no door, and acted like i was remiss for not having one on there, i just shrugged..

i also agree that a less inhibited society would tend to steal the thunder of rapists, or more accurately, circumvent the storn from the outset. it would lose its obsessive appeal to the extent that our bodies became demystified (and de-myhtified). it would be like Dr Evil demanding a 1 million dollar ransom for a world that spent that every half second, just not that threatening..

also, not sure why but i am infact becoming pretty asexual (i'm 44), when i used to be hyppersexual, into extreme kink and still am pretty much only aroused via that avenue but am just kind of over the drama. i think it's more sentient existence in general i'm over, though, perhaps more a function of existential malaise than sexual desensitisation, as i do occasionally get horny and the (self-administered) O is as intense as ever, just doesn't happen as much.

had this bizarre impulse to vote repub in the last election just to make the world end sooner.. no, didn't do it, not that far gone, but i think that without some really transformative paradise engineering (see www.hedweb.com for some serving suggestions) things will soon get pretty redundant as Fukuyama (respect him alot) suggests. i've often been an emotional and intellectual bellwether in the past, i'm a dj and almost every musical vision i have is manifested by the world in the future, along with my social perspectives, so if (non-religious) abandoning of life as a meaningful concept becomes a trend in the future, you heard it here first.. in the meanwhile we might as well dance eh?

susan 28, www.susan28.com, www.5gigawattlizard.net

http://www.susan28.com
palm beach, fl, but would rather be in Portland!