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Venezuelan Labor Leader Speaks on Radical Unions and Democracy - Sunday!

Venezuelan union leader Luís Primo will speak Sunday March 19th, 7 PM at the United Brotherhood of Carpenters Local 247 (2215 N. Lombard). Sr Primo is the former president of the Caracas Transportation Workers Union and a leader in the new radical labor federation, the National Workers Union (UNT). He will share information about the Venezuelan Labor movement, Democracy, and novel ways the Bolivarian Revolution is fighting corporate globalization.
March 15, 2006
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact:
Dan Denvir, Coordinator 503.236.7916

Building Power for Organized Labor:
The Union Movement and Revolution in Venezuela

Portland, Oregon (March 15, 2006) - Venezuelan union leader Luís Primo will speak Sunday March 19th, 7 PM at the United Brotherhood of
Carpenters Local 247 (2215 N. Lombard). Venezuela is undergoing radical changes under the leadership of President Hugo Chavez. While U.S. officials like Donald Rumsfeld compare Chavez to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, people throughout Latin America have increasingly followed
Venezuela's lead in pushing back against Washington-backed economic orthodoxy and bringing the long-marginalized poor into the political
process. While Chavez and Bush's public sparring grabs most U.S. headlines, a variety of social organizations and movements are responsible for having pushed Chavez into power and fueling what they call their "Bolivarian Revolution." Venezuelan union leader Luís Primo will speak to what is going on behind the headlines, specifically with regard to the labor movement's role in transforming Venezuela.

Labor has played a significant role in building a new Venezuela. When Chavez came to power in 1998, the Venezuelan labor movement was
entirely controlled by the old guard Confederación de Trabajadores Venezolanos (CTV; The Confederation of Venezuelan Workers). In the
1980s and 90s, the CTV collaborated with the government in passing new U.S.-backed, and deeply unpopular, economic "reforms". These pushes to weaken workers' power—including labor flexibilization laws that weakened job security and lowered wages and retirement benefits-led to a massive uprising in 1989 and finally, in 1998, Chavez's rise to power and the collapse of the two major parties. Venezuelan rank-and-file workers, upset with the CTV's participation in the 2002 coup and the 2003 lockout, formed a new union federation in 2003 called the Unión Nacional de Trabajadores (UNT; National Workers' Union). The UNT now represents over 90% of unionized private sector workers.

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The Portland Central America Solidarity Committee (PCASC) is a local non-profit whose mission is to support movements for social and
economic justice in Latin America. PCASC is part of a national movement to oppose Bush Administration intervention in Venezuela. To do so, we build ties between unions, artists and Portland community members and their counterparts in Venezuela. Luís Primo will also speak earlier in the day at the anti-war demonstration. All events are free and open to the public.

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homepage: homepage: http://www.pcasc.net
phone: phone: 503.236.7916
address: address: 616 E Burnside, Portland OR

Full Press Release.... 17.Mar.2006 00:58

PCASC/CBLOC info@pcasc.net

The full press release...


March 15, 2006
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Media contact:
Dan Denvir, Coordinator 503.236.7916

Building Power for Organized Labor:
The Union Movement and Revolution in Venezuela

Portland, Oregon (March 15, 2006) - Venezuelan union leader Luís Primo will speak Sunday March 19th, 7 PM at the United Brotherhood of Carpenters Local 247 (2215 N. Lombard). Venezuela is undergoing radical changes under the leadership of President Hugo Chavez. While U.S. officials like Donald Rumsfeld compare Chavez to Nazi leader Adolf Hitler, people throughout Latin America have increasingly followed Venezuela's lead in pushing back against Washington-backed economic orthodoxy and bringing the long-marginalized poor into the political process. While Chavez and Bush's public sparring grabs most U.S. headlines, a variety of social organizations and movements are responsible for having pushed Chavez into power and fueling what they call their "Bolivarian Revolution." Venezuelan union leader Luís Primo will speak to what is going on behind the headlines, specifically with regard to the labor movement's role in transforming Venezuela.

Labor has played a significant role in building a new Venezuela. When Chavez came to power in 1998, the Venezuelan labor movement was entirely controlled by the old guard Confederación de Trabajadores Venezolanos (CTV; The Confederation of Venezuelan Workers). In the 1980s and 90s, the CTV collaborated with the government in passing new U.S.-backed, and deeply unpopular, economic "reforms". These pushes to weaken workers' power—including labor flexibilization laws that weakened job security and lowered wages and retirement benefits-led to a massive uprising in 1989 and finally, in 1998, Chavez's rise to power and the collapse of the two major parties. Venezuelan rank-and-file workers, upset with the CTV's participation in the 2002 coup and the 2003 lockout, formed a new union federation in 2003 called the Unión Nacional de Trabajadores (UNT; National Workers' Union). The UNT now represents over 90% of unionized private sector workers.

The Portland Central America Solidarity Committee (PCASC) is a local non-profit whose mission is to support movements for social and economic justice in Latin America. PCASC is part of a national movement to oppose Bush Administration intervention in Venezuela. To do so, we build ties between unions, artists and Portland community members and their counterparts in Venezuela. Luís Primo will also speak earlier in the day at the anti-war demonstration. All events are free and open to the public.
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http://www.pcasc.net
503 236-7916
616 E. Burnside