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Stopping one giant casino in Cascade Locks made simple

Here it is. Simple step to make your thoughts known to the BIA and Gale Norton, schmuck. Or, would that be Schmuckette? Whatever, webform here to make your thoughts known. Let's Move!
One way to stop a large casino from locating in the Gorge Scenic Area
3 views since posting on Sun, September 18, 2005 - 9:50 PM
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Date & Time: Sunday, September 18, 2005 - Saturday, October 15, 2005
11:00 PM
Location: Cascade Locks, Oregon
Portland
More Info: www.gorgefriends.com
Here's where to make your comments.

 http://www.gorgecasinoeis.com/co/comment_form.html

A good place To get talking points, donate money and learn about the upcoming (tomorrow) public hearings.
 link to www.gorgefriends.org

Text of that page follows. Please help spread the word and take this simple action to keep the Gorge scenic and keep people off the gambling drug. We've got more important things to do with our lives, more fun.

SpiceRack. Feel free to copy and paste this and send it to people who live on this planet. Anyone can comment. Let's send a clear message. Back to Leftover Salmon, Live on nugs.net

You are here: Home ? Get Involved ? Take Action ? Tell the BIA to fully study impacts of proposed Gorge casino
Tell the BIA to fully study impacts of proposed Gorge casino

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Your participation is critical! - Please attend a public NEPA scoping meeting and/or submit written comments to the BIA



The Bureau of Indian Affairs of the Department of Interior has scheduled five public hearings in the Gorge and Portland beginning Sept. 15, to solicit public comments on the proposal for 500,000 sq. ft. mega-casino in the heart of the Columbia River Gorge.

The purpose of the meetings is to gauge public concerns about Oregon's first off reservation casino, as well as define the size and scope of the environmental impact statement (EIS) that will assess the impacts of the casino and all its related development on the environment. Click here for a list of talking points, a sample letter, and instructions on how to submit written comments.

The adverse impacts of a development of this size in the heart of a National Scenic Area would be massive. The potential impacts include degraded water and air quality as well as harms to endangered species, fish and wildlife habitat, wetlands, and scenic values. Population growth and increased development, urban sprawl, traffic, congestion, and expansion of I-84 are very likely to accompany a massive development of this nature.

The purpose of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) which requires this public process is to insure that all impacts of a proposed development, including cumulative effects, are considered and proper measures are put in place to avoid negative impacts.

It is critical that we pack every meeting with casino opponents and that we make sure that any EIS addresses all environmental impacts of the casino and its related development. We also want to send the message to the Department of the Interior that Oregon and Washington residents overwhelmingly want to keep this mega-casino out of the Gorge!


Please plan to attend at least one of these public meetings:

Cascade Locks: Thursday, Sept. 15, 6:00-8:30 pm
Port of Cascade Locks Gorge Pavilion, Marine Park
355 Wa-Na-Pa Street, Cascade Locks, OR
Presentations: 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm

Cascade Locks: Saturday, Sept. 17, 9:30 am-Noon
Port of Cascade Locks Gorge Pavilion, Marine Park
355 Wa-Na-Pa Street, Cascade Locks, OR
Presentations: 10 am and 11 am

Portland: Monday, Sept. 19, 5:00-8:00 pm
Benson High School, Cafeteria
546 NE 12th Ave., Portland, OR
Presentations: 6 pm and 7 pm

Hood River: Wednesday, Sept. 21, 6:00-8:30 pm
Hood River Inn, Gorge Room
1108 East Marina Way, Hood River, OR
Presentations: 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm

Stevenson: Wednesday, Sept. 28, 6:00-8:30 pm
Rock Creek Community Center
710 SW Rock Creek Dr., Stevenson, WA
Presentations: 6:30 pm and 7:30 pm

Talking Points:

This is your chance to tell the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) to make sure the following impacts are fully studied:

* The adverse impacts to fish, wildlife, plants, wetlands, water quality, water quantity, air quality, scenic, cultural and historic resources and natural resourced-based recreation (the casino site is adjacent to the mouth of Herman Creek, one of the best salmon-bearing streams in the Gorge).
* Impacts on your community as a result of 3 million gamblers traveling through the Gorge each year, creating traffic jams, decreasing public safety and causing more air pollution.
* Impacts of modifying or expanding I-84, Bridge of the Gods, The Historic Highway and SR 14 to accommodate millions of casino patrons.
* Impacts of population growth, affordable housing shortages, pressures on local schools, and projected expansion of the urban growth boundaries of Cascade Locks and surrounding communities into the Scenic Area.
* The air quality and visibility effects from 3 million annual visitors throughout the gorge and surrounding Wilderness Areas, including Mt. Hood and Mt. Adams, which are designated as protected "airsheds."
* The precedent of allowing an off-reservation casino in the heart of the Gorge that opens the door to even more casinos in the Scenic Area.
* Consideration of all viable alternatives. The feasibility of siting the casino on the Warm Springs Reservation must be considered as a viable alternative.
* Extension of the comment period to 45 days. This proposal is so controversial that the BIA should honor its prior commitment and extend the comment period to 45 days.


Instructions on how to submit written comments:

These will not be formal hearings but statements made at each event will be recorded. Be sure to bring written copies of your comments.

If you cannot attend the hearings please submit a written comment by visiting www.gorgecasinoEIS.com or by mailing or faxing a letter to: June Boynton, Bureau of Indian Affairs, 911 NE 11th Ave., Portland, OR 97232; Fax: 503-231-2201.

The deadline for written comments is currently September 30, 2005, though there is a chance this will be extended to October 15. Please check this website for current information, or contact Katy Daily at  katy@gorgefriends.org or (503) 224-4011 x110.

Sample letter (please edit and include your own concerns):

June Boynton
Environmental Protection Specialist
Bureau of Indian Affairs
911 NE 11th Avenue
Portland, OR 97232
FAX: (503) 231-6791

Re: Scoping comments - Columbia Gorge trust acquisition, casino and resort proposal

Dear Ms. Boynton:

Please include these following comments in the official record for review of the proposal for a trust acquisition, casino resort and highway expansion within the Columbia River Gorge in Cascade Locks.

General Comments

I am opposed to the proposal for an off-reservation casino, resort and highway expansion due to its potential to adversely affect the environment and also the precedent with it will set by opening the door to more casinos and an explosion of inappropriate development with in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area.

Comment Period

The 30-day comment period is insufficient considering the overwhelming public concern and opposition to this proposal. The BIA and the casino consultants told the public that it would have a 45-day comment period for scoping. It should honor these statements and extend the comment period.

Environmental Impacts

The proposal for a 500,000 square foot casino and expansion to I-84 is likely to cause significant and irreversible adverse impacts to fish, wildlife, plants, wetlands, water quality, water quantity (groundwater and surface water) air quality, scenic resources, cultural resources, historic resources and natural resource-based recreation. The massive scope of the proposal and all of its associated development would result in the expansion of the urban growth boundaries of surrounding communities and the loss of forest land and agricultural land due to the need to expand infrastructure, create housing and services for the projected 1,740 employees. The environmental impact statement (EIS) must consider all of these potential effects.

Connected Actions, Cumulative Actions and Similar Actions

The EIS must include complete analyses of all of the impacts caused by the casino resort proposal, its connected actions, its cumulative effects and all similar actions. These include but are not limited to all development that may result from the proposal, including population growth, residential development, commercial development, industrial development, transportation infrastructure expansion (expansion of I-84, the Historic Columbia River Highway, State Route 14, and the Bridge of the Gods), projected expansion of the urban growth boundaries of Cascade Locks and surrounding communities.

Air Pollution

The traffic resulting from the casino resort would likely cause adverse affects to air quality and visibility in the Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area, Hatfield Wilderness Area, Mount Hood Wilderness Area and Mount Adams Wilderness Area. Mount Hood and Mount Adams are designated as Class I airsheds. The EIS must consider the proposal and all related and likely future development and its cumulative effects on air quality within these areas.

Alternatives

Siting the proposed casino within the Warm Springs reservation or on other suitable locations outside of the Columbia River Gorge must be considered as viable alternatives to the proposal. Siting the casino near Hood River should not be considered as a viable alternative because federal law and site-specific impediments prohibit it.

Thank you for considering these comments.

Your Name
Address

homepage: homepage: http://www.gorgefriends.org


pretty gorge 19.Sep.2005 00:06

northman

i know..to get a better perspective on this..read some history about The Dalles Dam and the eventual flooding of Celilo falls--for electricity for a aluminim plant(no longer around?)..or a dam further upriver so some arid land could be irrigated and farmed(white-guys given almost free land!)..this great river has a history that is the oldest around and change has been a constant in my 60 years of carousing, mostly from Umatilla to Astoria..peace.

it's their gorge 19.Sep.2005 04:08

they can put a casino in it if they want to

How about this:

(a) are you an Indian?

if yes, then engage the process any way you want. go to town.

if no, then

(b) ask the tribe nicely if they could put their casino somewhere else

(c) listen politely to their answer

(d) shut up, go home, and mind your own business, white man

spider 19.Sep.2005 05:37

sovereign Indian Nation

Those people that oppose the Native American use of their land to build a casino are confused as to the relationship of this country with the sovereign Indian Nation. The indigenous people of this land have never relinquished their sovereignty. The right of ownership of land by European Americans is a temporary claim that may be altered if the future brings justice to this land. Land acquisition by the white invaders was done through war, broken treaties and legal chicanery. Future courts may recognize that these were illegal acquisitions and return the land to its legal owners. So instead of complaining what autonomous people do with their own land, be appreciative of living in a time when your illegal and immoral possession of that land is recognized.

question 19.Sep.2005 12:28

Questioner

So if Native American tribes start clearcutting in the Cascades, we aren't allowed to complain?

I agree 19.Sep.2005 13:27

me

with questioner. Indians have a right to land ownership, but that doesn't excuse anyone from abusing the land, white or non white. I also don't believe, in fact I know, that many indians do not support gambling casinos as a source of revenue for tribes. Seems like a stereotype industry and while, Indian tribes should not stoop to the desires of white men, they should listen to their inner hearts. So, you don't think that Indian Nations can make unwise decisions? That's PC crap. The same PC crap that tribal names for sports teams are derogatory. Some are, but many are positive and complementary. Speak to Indians around the country and you will not find two that agree on every issue.

forever more 19.Sep.2005 15:20

weight

It's true that people from other continents came to this one now referred to as the United States, methodically and ruthlessly demolishing the culture and residency of people who had likely been native to it for many, many centuries, but this fact does not justify the notion that native americans own this land any more than other people do.

It's not possible to own something that cannot be owned. People, human beings cannot own the earth and sky and all that occupy them. Ownership is a human notion. Human beings are guests residing on this galactic component we call earth, with it's wonderful mountains, prairies, oceans, and rivers.

Human beings, because of their capability of being aware of the consequences of their actions, and because, given the nature of their being, their potential for great destruction of the very earth they reside on, are custodians of all their consciousness connects them with.

Human beings have destroyed, desecrated and defaced so much of the earth, particularly in the last 200 years, establishing a miserable precedent and a horrific legacy for generations of human beings to follow, not to mention other living creatures and biological life forms that have a right equal to that of human beings to exist on earth.

Injustices have been made against native americans and while gradually efforts are beginning to be made to correct them, they should continue to be redressed. Anything courts may decide regarding notions of ownership or sovereignty of a part of the earth or any other galactic component by one people or another, should not excuse human activity that is a desecration of the earth.

Gambling casinos, resorts, or any other human construction not dedicated to the respect, appreciation and enjoyment of the natural wonder that is the Columbia Gorge system, are exactly that kind of desecration.

As fellow custodians of this earth, do not allow petty human squabbles about silly notions of ownership begin to methodically gnaw away at the majesty of the Columbia River Gorge system.

Click on the link to The Columbia Gorge Casino Resort Environmental Impact Report, and make your feelings known for all time.

"Native" is relative 19.Sep.2005 16:14

Brother

Even Indians are not technically native to America. Indeed they immigrated here 10-15,000 years ago from Asia and we ALL (modern man) emigrated out of Afric around 50,000 years ago. Just because they got here first doesnt give them or anybody else the green light to desicrate the land or the REAL natives, the native plant and animal species of America.

yikes! 19.Sep.2005 20:30

northman

My people emerged from Mt Shasta some 25,000 years ago(it was a dark and rainy night)..regret the misunderstanding of our origins. Peace.

gambling 20.Sep.2005 08:29

spider

If you oppose Indian casinos but have done nothing to
oppose the state lottery then your efforts stink of racism.

As long as gambling is legal in Oregon the sovereign Indian
Nation has a right to engage in this activity.

When the lottery was being formed in the 80s I could find
no allies that would help with stopping this travesty.
Now that the Indians want to profit from these laws those
that have profited from the lottery are up in arms.

Redirect your efforts towards ending the State's love
affair with the Lottery.

A Point 20.Sep.2005 11:39

Questioner

I don't think that people are objecting to Indian casinos - I think that they are objecting to putting them in the Gorge.

If the Oregon State Lottery proposed putting a big building in the Gorge, I'd object to that to.

our legacy 20.Sep.2005 13:00

weight

As an Oregonian for nearly 50 years, I have never, ever bought an Oregon lottery ticket, or participated in any other of its gambling revenue producing schemes. I voted against gambling in Oregon whenever it was on the ballot. I wish I'd been in a position to do more, as many Oregonians have.

Quite possibly, hopefully, there are many more Oregonians who feel similarly about gambling in Oregon, particularly where it concerns siting an anamolous structure dedicated specifically for that purpose squarely in the Columbia Gorge. Still, Oregon voters have elected to have gambling continue to expand as one of our budget supporting revenue sources, a reality that threatens to irreparably diminish our sense of those principle values that define us as people surrounded by wonder and beauty.

Those Oregon residents who have elected to have and participate in gambling in Oregon, let them do so, but not in the Columbia Gorge, not at Timberline Lodge or anywhere on Mt. Hood, not at Crater Lake, not at Fort Rock, not on the Alvord desert, the Snake River Canyon, or any other identity defining feature of the state of Oregon.

Gambling is as old as man, and opportunities are available to participate in it in many locations, but Oregonians of all ethnic origins should have the common sense not to allow gambling to be established in a sprawl promoting, expansive, resort casino that would be a contemptuous desecration of the magnificence of the Columbia Gorge.

As the water slowly rose and effectively destroyed Celilo Falls with construction of the Dalles Dam, so will Casino Resorts slowly begin to nibble away at the irreplaceable wonder and beauty of the Columbia Gorge. Once it's done, it's done. Cave in to the greedy demands of those who insist upon a casino resort operation in the gorge and we will begin to see other pieces of the Columbia Gorge likewise forfeited.

At this time, we can still reach for the true vision that will conserve the Columbia Gorge for generations to come.

I am totally 20.Sep.2005 13:02

me

with you spider. All these hellholes of smoke should be banished. They are the bane of working class citizens. Talk to your governor who seems to be a big supporter of this crap.

Original posting had opp for you to comment to the BIA 20.Sep.2005 13:27

Albert Kaufman

That's kind of key. If you agree or disagree, they're taking your comments.

cultural imperialism rearing its head in activism again? 20.Sep.2005 22:28

GRINGO STARS

Yes, all humans are "brothers and sisters" - true. YET it is white privilege and its distinctly white "colorblind" creed which can come to the inference that race doesn't REALLY matter. Which is BS. Because race DOES matter. Not to white people so much because white people are on the top rung.

American Indians should be able to do ANYTHING they want to do on their OWN land. For white people to come and try to tell Indians what to do or what not to do disgusts me personally.

a mistake to stop the casino 21.Sep.2005 01:51

sport

Dont stop the casino everybody!! Gambling is kind of fun if you don't get too careless. It helps schools doesn't it? You know, the tribe is going to make a really nice building for the casino. It won't show too much from the river and the hiking trails. It really is the indians land and they should be able to do whatever they want with it. White people have done so much much wrong to native americans in the past, so letting them build this casino could be a way to make up for some of that messy busines.

There's a lot of space along the river and plenty of places left over to look at pretty things if thats what you're interested in. People need ways to blow off steam and they want to have fun. Things are going to change I'll bet, because people get used to things that bother them at first. Bet there will be herb and ladies for hire in the future some time because those are other great ways to make money, and people will get used to them just like they are going to get used to the casino. Money for schools will be rollin in. Good days are ahead for Oregon.

indians have had much more than enough 21.Sep.2005 04:37

of white people telling them

what the "wise" thing to do would be

if you're worried about the state of the Columbia River

come preach to the natives when the whites aren't poisoning it any more

or better yet

getcher ass back to Europe and tell THEM where they can't build a building

or are they exempt from this interesting fixation on "wilderness" amongst the settlers

around here

Plane Tickets To Europe Are Cheap This Time Of Year 21.Sep.2005 06:17

Questionier

I don't know why Gringo Stars and "indians have had much more than enough of white people telling them" haven't already bought plane tickets back to Europe.

After all, how can you live with yourself, squatting on land that really belongs to the Indians in SE Portland?

because... 21.Sep.2005 08:06

GRINGO STARS

My partner is an Indian. I know Indians. Not one of them has ever asked me, or asked white people in general, to leave for Europe, or for anywhere else. But your question seems more like polemics than an earnest question.

Western technology 21.Sep.2005 11:48

Erik

Forget race. Its Western civilization and technology that is the thing we are talking about. The "Native Americans" learned from the white man how to desecrate the land. They learned from the the white man to exploit lower class for white man money. Its all bad karma especially when you are talking about a sacred place like the gorge.

yes, let's talk "karma" as long as we're appropriating non-European beliefs 21.Sep.2005 14:46

GRINGO STARS

White men all but destroyed tribes and granted (imposed) sovereign ghettos to Indians to stay away from "decent" US society. Now that Indians are taking white peoples' money, white people complain bitterly. As spider said above: where was this complaint when the Lottery was established? The lottery is implemented by the ruling class and acts as a tax on the working and the poor, essentially.

That land is for Indians to do with as they please. Establishing a precedent that non-Indians can continue to tell Indians what to do is karma in and of itself. If you want to speak of karma, consider the Indians' track record of how to live with nature. Now consider white Americans' track record. Karma indeed.

"Forget race" some say, conveniently - White privilege is the privilege of forgetting race. It becomes much harder to do so when you do not enjoy white privilege.
 http://uts.cc.utexas.edu/%7Erjensen/freelance/racearticles.htm

White people's burden
 http://alternet.org/rights/24745/

The Fears of White People
 http://www.zmag.org/content/showarticle.cfm?SectionID=30&ItemID=8698

who cares 28.Sep.2005 04:17

george

who cares about america anyway

Indian Gambling at Cascade Locks 200 Years Ago 12.Oct.2005 07:32

Even Steven mccluresteven@yahoo.com

There is clear historical precedent for the Warm Springs Tribe's resort and casino in Cascade Locks. The Tribes were gambling in huge cedar lodges at the site of the present city when Lewis & Clark passed through 200 years ago. The Corps of Discovery reached the Cascades of the Columbia, after which the mountain range was named, on October 30th, 1805. William Clark's map indicates 6 "houses" on the south side of the head of the "Great Shoots or Rapids," the exact location of Cascade Locks today. The Corps encamped near another village on the north side then, as only that side allowed portage. Returning east almost 6 months later, however, they found most of that village's multi-family lodges had been moved to the south side. On April 13th, 1806, Captain Meriwether Lewis with "two canoes and some additional hands passed over the river above the rapids to the Y-eh-huh village in order to purchase one or more canoes. I found the village consisting of 11 houses crowded with inhabitants; it appeared to me that they could have mustered about 60 fighting men then present. They appeared very friendly disposed, and I soon obtained two small canoes from them for which I gave two robes and four elkskins." The largest lodge Lewis & Clark reported in that area was about 160 by 45 feet, with double-wall insulation. The upper Chinookan inhabitants of these magnificent dwellings enjoyed a rich culture that included games and gambling. Alexander Ross reported in 1849: "When not employed in war or hunting, the men generally spend their time in gambling." (Cited in Culin's "Games" below.) According to Carolyn Gilman in "Lewis and Clark Across the Divide" (2003), gambling could be big business: "Trade and gifting were not the only ways wealth changed hands. Huge quantities of goods were redistributed through gambling, which accompanied most fairs, potlatches, and ceremonies. It was a team sport, with officials and rules, played by one village against another; some professional gamblers were sponsored by village leaders. Gambling luck was granted by one's guardian spirit, and the victor had the honor of giving out the winnings among his or her friends and family." William Clark described a mystifying game played by passing a hidden marked bone piece back and forth between hands while chanting, ending with the opponent guessing which hand held the prize. It was common throughout the region and he observed it neat Fort Clatsop on December 9th, 1805, and The Dalles on April 18th, 1806. Stewart Culin also describes this "hand game" and others of the Chinookan people in "Games of the North American Indians" (1907/1975). The upper Chinookan people at the Cascades are identified by Gary E. Moulton, editor of "The Definitive Journals of Lewis & Clark" (1991/ 2002), as Wishram-Wasco. Unfortunately, they faced a familiar scenario of disease and displacement: "Archaeological testing indicates that the occupation at this locality began about 500 years ago and continued at least until 1855, being abandoned after an Indian uprising in 1856. . . . With the decline in the native population and subsequent amalgamation into fewer groups, the identity of this and other Chinookan bands was gradually lost, with the survivors becoming known simply as the Cascades Indians." (Volume 7, page 114.) Today the mighty Cascades are inundated by the reservoir behind the Bonneville Dam. And, while the entire environment has been altered by a bridge, freeway, railroad, airport and city, the fact remains that the Tribes once gambled in great lodges at Cascade Locks.

Indian Gambling at Cascade Locks 200 Years Ago 12.Oct.2005 08:40

Even Steven mccluresteven@yahoo.com

There is clear historical precedent for the Warm Springs Tribes'
resort and casino in Cascade Locks. The Tribes were gambling in
huge cedar lodges at the site of the present city when Lewis &
Clark passed through 200 years ago.

The Corps of Discovery reached the Cascades of the Columbia,
after which the mountain range was named, on October 30th, 1805.
William Clark's map indicates 6 "houses" on the south side of
the head of the "Great Shoots or Rapids," the exact location of
Cascade Locks today. The Corps encamped near another village on
the north side then, as only that side allowed portage.
Returning east almost 6 months later, however, they found most
of that village's multi-family lodges had been moved to the
south side.

On April 13th, 1806, Captain Meriwether Lewis with "two canoes
and some additional hands passed over the river above the rapids
to the Y-eh-huh village in order to purchase one or more canoes.
I found the village consisting of 11 houses crowded with
inhabitants; it appeared to me that they could have mustered
about 60 fighting men then present. They appeared very friendly
disposed, and I soon obtained two small canoes from them for
which I gave two robes and four elkskins."

The largest lodge Lewis & Clark reported in that area was about
160 by 45 feet, with double-wall insulation. The upper
Chinookan inhabitants of these magnificent dwellings enjoyed a
rich culture that included games and gambling. Alexander Ross
reported in 1849: "When not employed in war or hunting, the men
generally spend their time in gambling." (Cited in Culin's
"Games" below.) According to Carolyn Gilman in "Lewis and
Clark Across the Divide" (2003), gambling could be big business:

"Trade and gifting were not the only ways wealth changed hands.
Huge quantities of goods were redistributed through gambling,
which accompanied most fairs, potlatches, and ceremonies. It
was a team sport, with officials and rules, played by one
village against another; some professional gamblers were
sponsored by village leaders. Gambling luck was granted by
one's guardian spirit, and the victor had the honor of giving
out the winnings among his or her friends and family."

William Clark described a mystifying game played by passing a
hidden marked bone piece back and forth between hands while
chanting, ending with the opponent guessing which hand held the
prize. It was common throughout the region and he observed it
near Fort Clatsop on December 9th, 1805, and The Dalles on April
18th, 1806. Stewart Culin also describes this "hand game" and
others of the Chinookan people in "Games of the North American
Indians" (1907/1975).

The upper Chinookan people at the Cascades are identified by
Gary E. Moulton, editor of "The Definitive Journals of Lewis &
Clark" (1991/2002), as Wishram-Wasco. Unfortunately, they faced
a familiar scenario of disease and displacement:

"Archaeological testing indicates that the occupation at this
locality began about 500 years ago and continued at least until
1855, being abandoned after an Indian uprising in 1856. . . .
With the decline in the native population and subsequent
amalgamation into fewer groups, the identity of this and other
Chinookan bands was gradually lost, with the survivors becoming
known simply as the Cascades Indians." (Volume 7, page 114.)

Today the mighty Cascades are inundated by the reservoir behind
the Bonneville Dam. And, while the entire environment has been
altered by a bridge, freeway, railroad, airport and city, the
fact remains that the Tribes once gambled in great lodges at
Cascade Locks.

Indian Gambling at Cascade Locks 200 Years Ago 12.Oct.2005 10:04

Even Steven mccluresteven@yahoo.com

Please read my comment to the BIA below.