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FITZGERALD'S OPENING MOVE? indicting of Sun-Times-Hollinger David Radler,of Novak/Plame...

Indictments starting on the outside, and working 'in' toward the White House, Richard Perle, Robert Novak? "US Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who is also the special prosecutor in the Valerie Plame-CIA leak, has indicted David Radler, ex-publisher of Black's Chicago Sun-Times, charged with criminal fraud....Black has not been charged yet, but US Attorney Fitzgerald said that Radler plans on pleading guilty and testifying at a criminal trial against his former boss [Bilderberger Conrad Black]." Thus wider information, more indictments, snowballing, etc. "The net may also tighten around the Neo-Con propagandist, war profiteer and fellow Bilderberger Richard Perle, who was also a former Hollinger board member and was cited in a 2004 SEC report on fraudulent financial activity at Hollinger. Plus, Plame-outer Robert Novak was syndicated by Sun Times of Chicago, owned by Hollinger....]

Get the picture?

Expect prosecutors to begin working on former Hollinger directors to turn against Black and act as witnesses for the prosecution. 'Flipping witnesses,' as its known, has been particularly successful in securing
convictions against executives of Enron, the energy firm suit that snowballled into one of America's biggest scandals.
next? [Conrad Black, Hollinger]
next? [Conrad Black, Hollinger] "How dare you! Look at my Masonic ring!"*
then...? [Richard Perle, neocon parasite, bills Hollinger for daily groceries]*
then...? [Richard Perle, neocon parasite, bills Hollinger for daily groceries]*
then...? [Plame Outer Robert Novak, syndicated by Hollinger's Sun Times]
then...? [Plame Outer Robert Novak, syndicated by Hollinger's Sun Times]
then...? Henry the K. [of Hollinger, which has lots of Pentagon neocons]*
then...? Henry the K. [of Hollinger, which has lots of Pentagon neocons]*
then...? [Rove, long connection to Sun-Times's Novak, and White House]
then...? [Rove, long connection to Sun-Times's Novak, and White House]
then...? [Cheney: no one on earth deserves an orange suit more.]
then...? [Cheney: no one on earth deserves an orange suit more.]
* = Bilderbergers

summary:
-------------------------

US Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who is also the special prosecutor in the
Valerie Plame-CIA leak, has indicted David Radler, former publisher of
Black's Chicago Sun-Times, charging him with criminal fraud...

David Radler, who was president and chief operating officer of Hollinger,
in-house attorney Mark Kipnis, and Ravelston Corp. Ltd., Black's insolvent
Toronto-based holding company, were charged in a seven-count indictment of
federal fraud for diverting more than $32 million through a complex and
secret series of transactions from Hollinger International. The Ravelston
Corporation Limited was another Conrad Black controlled entity that in
turn controlled Hollinger International through Hollinger, Inc. (Hard to
keep track of all these corporate entities? That's exactly the point.)

Ravelston was a privately-held company with 98.5 percent owned by officers
and directors of [Hollinger] International and Hollinger, Inc.

"Lord" Conrad Black was Ravelston's controlling shareholder as well as the
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Hollinger International and
Hollinger, Inc.

Black has not been charged yet, but US Attorney Fitzgerald said that
Radler plans on pleading guilty and testifying at a criminal trial against
his former boss.

...

RICHARD PERLE, OF HOLLINGER: The net may also tighten around the Neo-Con
propagandist, war profiteer and fellow Bilderberger Richard Perle, who was
also a former Hollinger board member and was cited in a 2004 SEC report on
fraudulent financial activity at Hollinger.

...

ROBERT NOVAK, PLAME 'OUTER' OF HOLLINGER CONNECTIONS: Black's wife,
Barbara Amiel Black, a strongly pro-Israeli columnist for [her husband [Conrad Black/Hollinger's owned] Telegraph and Maclean's and a former Vice President of Hollinger [herself], was cited in a class action lawsuit brought by Canadian investors in Hollinger...The CHICAGO SUN TIMES SYNDICATES ROBERT NOVAK, the first journalist to reveal in his column Valerie Plame's CIA identity and that of her Brewster Jennings non official cover company. That leak is at the center of Fitzgerald's probe of Karl Rove, Lewis 'Scooter' Libby, and others in the Bush administration for violations of national security laws.)"

...

[Black was]...accused of running a corporate kleptocracy. A 500-page
internal report commissioned by his former company, Hollinger
International, alleged that Black and others siphoned off $400m in an
aggressive looting of the publishing companys assets.

The cash taken by Black, his former deputy David Radler and their
associates including Blacks wife Lady Barbara Amiel-Black, represents
95.2% of Hollingers entire adjusted net income during the period
1997-2003, claimed the report. Alongside the big numbers, the report is
studded with a glittering trail of outrageous expense claims. Between 2001
and 2003, Black and company spent $23.7m on private jets. Blacks corporate
expense reports charge the company for items such as handbags for Mrs BB
($2,463), jogging attire for Mrs BB ($140), exercise equipment ($2,083), T
Anthony Ltd leather briefcase ($2,057), opera tickets for C&BB ($2,785),
stereo equipment for the New York apartment ($828), silverware for Blacks
corporate jet ($3,530) summer drinks ($24,950), a happy birthday, Barbara
dinner party at New Yorks La Grenouille restaurant ($42,870), claimed the
report.

KISSINGER, KRAVIS: Shareholders and Hollinger want the money back and are
pursuing Black for more than $1 billion in the American courts. Also at
risk are his former friends and directors, including Henry Kissinger,
American defence adviser Richard Perle and Marie-Jose Kravis, wife of
billionaire Henry Kravis. They stand accused of standing idly by as Black
raided the piggy bank. Their bill for failing to stop Blacks excesses
could run to hundreds of millions of dollars.

WHATEVER the final outcome for Black, he and his former colleagues now
look set for years of legal skirmishes. To date Black faces:

* An investigation by the SEC that could lead to fines and a lifetime ban
from holding corporate positions;
* Investigations by the Illinois secretary of state, assisted by the FBI,
that could lead to a criminal investigation headed by Illinois's attorney-
general [Lisa Madigan]. A conviction could end in a prison sentence;
* A racketeering suit brought by Hollinger International, Blacks former
company, claiming $1.2 billion;
* A $300,000 writ against Black and former directors from Cardinal
Capital, an American shareholder;
* Claims against Hollinger and Black from other shareholders including the
Louisiana Teachers Pension Fund and the Washington Areas Carpenters Fund;
* Potential investigations by British and Canadian authorities into Blacks
activities outside America.

The legal fallout from the debacle will have a wide impact and take years
to settle, said Columbia University professor John Coffee, an authority on
white-collar crime. Blacks case, he said, reminds him of the trial of
Dennis Kozlowski. The former boss of Tyco is awaiting a retrial on charges
that he looted $600m from the conglomerate. Like Black he enjoyed a
lavish, company-funded lifestyle, spending $1m on his wife's birthday bash
and $6,000 on a shower curtain for his Manhattan flat.

...

He expects prosecutors to begin working on former Hollinger directors to
turn against Black and act as witnesses for the prosecution. Flipping
witnesses, as its known, has been particularly successful in securing
convictions against executives of Enron, the energy firm that imploded in
one of Americas biggest scandals.

...

Black talked world affairs with Henry Kissinger and Richard Perle, the
former Pentagon defence adviser. A good lunch followed the short meetings
and never did the board query Black or his spending. Black and Radler
bought newspaper titles from Hollinger, sometimes for as little as $1, and
added them to their own private companies. The board appears to have
failed to ask if this was as good a deal for Hollinger as it appeared to
be for Black.

According to Breedens report, Black contributed to his board members
charities and invested in businesses they were tied to. In the case of
Perle, who at one point sat on Hollingers compensation committee,
Hollinger awarded him millions in bonuses and even picked up his grocery
bills--at least until Black started querying Perle's expenses.

In May 1985 came an opportunity that would change Black's life.

At the Bilderberg meeting at Arrowwood, outside New York, Andrew Knight
told Black that The Daily Telegraph was undergoing severe financial and
managerial strain. The paper was the English-speaking world's
largest-circulation conservative broadsheet. It dated from 1855, the time
of the Crimean War. Black's great-grandfather Robert Thomas Riley was the
son of one of the founding shareholders....

-------------------------




Conrad Black Hollinger Fraud:David Radler Indicted
by URI DOWBENKO

Conrad Black Hollinger Fraud:David Radler Indicted (PHOTO: International
Con Man Conrad Black)

Even his fictitious "nobility" and Bilderberger credentials may not be
able to protect notorious con man "Lord" Conrad Black.



The noose tightens even more around international racketeer "Lord" Conrad
Black as Chicago-based US Attorney Patrick Fitzgerald, who is also the
special prosecutor in the Valerie Plame-CIA leak, has indicted David
Radler, former publisher of Black's Chicago Sun-Times, charging him with
criminal fraud in stealing $32 million from the paper's parent company,
Hollinger International.

In its heyday, Hollinger International owned more than 100 newspapers,
including the Chicago Sun-Times and Jerusalem Post.

David Radler, who was president and chief operating officer of Hollinger,
in-house attorney Mark Kipnis, and Ravelston Corp. Ltd., Black's insolvent
Toronto-based holding company, were charged in a seven-count indictment of
federal fraud for diverting more than $32 million through a complex and
secret series of transactions from Hollionger International.

The Ravelston Corporation Limited was another Conrad Black controlled
entity that in turn controlled Hollinger International through Hollinger,
Inc.

(Hard to keep track of all these corporate entities? That's exactly the
point.)

According to the seven count indictment, Radler and Kipnis sold various
newspaper publishing companies, in order to skim off money for corporate
insiders (read: Black) by funneling payments disguised as non-competition
fees to a company they controlled, as well as to themselves.

The money trail and network of Black controlled corporate entities ended
in Ravelston Corporation Limited, a Canadian company which is now in
Canadian bankruptcy proceedings.

Ravelston was a privately-held company with 98.5 percent owned by officers
and directors of [Hollinger] International and Hollinger, Inc.

"Lord" Conrad Black was Ravelston's controlling shareholder as well as the
Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of Hollinger International and
Hollinger, Inc.

Black has not been charged yet, but US Attorney Fitzgerald said that
Radler plans on pleading guilty and testifying at a criminal trial against
his former boss.

"The investing public has a right to expect that officers and directors of
publicly traded companies are managing, not stealing, the shareholder's
money," Fitzgerald said. "And they have a right to expect that payments to
insiders are being reviewed, not hidden from their view. Sadly, the
indictment charges that the insiders at Hollinger, whose job it was to
safeguard the shareholders, made it their job to steal and conceal."

According to Reuters, "Between January 1999 and May 2001, the defendants
sold six separate newspapers and a trade publication for a total of $753
million dollars that included American Trucker ($75 million, sold in May,
1998); Community Newspapers Holding, Inc. ($472 million, sold in Feb..,
1999); Horizon Publications, Inc. ($43.7 million, sold in March, 1999),
which was owned by Radler, Kipnis and other Hollinger International
executives; Forum Communications, Inc. ($14 million, sold in Sept., 2000);
PMG Acquisition Corp. ($59 million, sold in Oct., 2000); and Newspaper
Holdings Corp. ($90 million, sold in Nov., 2000)."

The corporate insider self dealing involves Radler, the former Sun Times
publisher who negotiated the terms of each transaction, and Kipnis, his
in-house attorney, who drafted the deals. The closing documents for each
sale included a non-compete agreement, used to enrich the corporate
insiders. Radler and Kipnis did not disclose their payments to Hollinger
International's audit committee.

The net may also tighten around the Neo-Con propagandist, war profiteer
and fellow Bilderberger Richard Perle, who was also a former Hollinger
board member and was cited in a 2004 SEC report on fraudulent financial
activity at Hollinger.

Wayne Madsen reports that "Black's wife, Barbara Amiel Black, a strongly
pro-Israeli columnist for the Telegraph and Maclean's and a former Vice
President of Hollinger, was cited in a class action lawsuit brought by
Canadian investors in Hollinger... The Chicago Sun Times syndicates Robert
Novak, the first journalist to reveal in his column Valerie Plame's CIA
identity and that of her Brewster Jennings non official cover company.
That leak is at the center of Fitzgerald's probe of Karl Rove, Lewis
'Scooter' Libby, and others in the Bush administration for violations of
national security laws.)"
(www.waynemadsenreport.com)

Will Conrad Black's frauds protect him? Not if his former employee Sun
Times publisher David Radler "sings."

In that case, "Lord" Conrad Black has better stay in a non-extraditable
jurisdiction for the rest of his life.

SEE PREVIOUS STORY
The Noose Tightens:Richard Perle's Hollinger Caper by URI DOWBENKO
 http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/channel.cfm?channelid=2&contentid=1075

* URI DOWBENKO is the author of "Bushwhacked: Inside Stories of True
Conspiracy" and "Hoodwinked: Watching Movies with Eyes Wide Open." He can
be reached at  u.dowbenko@lycos.com His website is UriDowbenko.Com For more
information on Dowbenko's articles and samples of chapters from his books
Bushwhacked & Hoodwinked"


MORE ON CONRAD BLACK:

A black future: Canada's top Bilderberger faces jail

September 05, 2004 - The Times

 http://business.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,8209-1246866,00.html

After last week's damning report into Hollinger International accused Lord
Black of Crossharbour of looting the company of $400m, the former
Telegraph owner faces a welter of lawsuits and the prospect of a criminal
inquiry that could lead to jail. Dominic Rushe reports from New York

AS a top bodyguard, James Hyslop saw some of the worlds most powerful
people at their most vulnerable. Working in security for the Bilderberg
Group, Hyslop came into close contact with the statesmen and leading
businessmen that make up the right-wing think-tanks membership.

Conrad Black, peer, former Telegraph boss and Bilderberg member, always
impressed him, said Hyslop. He didnt need someone around the way other
people on the world stage do--the bodyguard as a status symbol.

Hyslop acted as Black's bodyguard, accompanying him on his private jet and
attending functions. He has nothing but fond memories of a man he
describes as generous, warm, witty and intelligent.

Last week Lord Black's former colleagues painted a very different picture
of the disgraced peer one that could land him in jail. In a phrase
reminiscent of Black's own famously florid oratory, he was accused of
running a corporate kleptocracy. A 500-page internal report commissioned
by his former company, Hollinger International, alleged that Black and
others siphoned off $400m in an aggressive looting of the publishing
companys assets.

The cash taken by Black, his former deputy David Radler and their
associates including Blacks wife Lady Barbara Amiel-Black, represents
95.2% of Hollingers entire adjusted net income during the period
1997-2003, claimed the report. Alongside the big numbers, the report is
studded with a glittering trail of outrageous expense claims. Between 2001
and 2003, Black and co. spent $23.7m on private jets. Blacks corporate
expense reports charge the company for items such as handbags for Mrs BB
($2,463), jogging attire for Mrs BB ($140), exercise equipment ($2,083), T
Anthony Ltd leather briefcase ($2,057), opera tickets for C&BB ($2,785),
stereo equipment for the New York apartment ($828), silverware for Blacks
corporate jet ($3,530) summer drinks ($24,950), a happy birthday, Barbara
dinner party at New Yorks La Grenouille restaurant ($42,870), claimed the
report.

Shareholders and Hollinger want the money back and are pursuing Black for
more than $1 billion in the American courts. Also at risk are his former
friends and directors, including Henry Kissinger, American defence adviser
Richard Perle and Marie-Jose Kravis, wife of billionaire Henry Kravis.
They stand accused of standing idly by as Black raided the piggy bank.
Their bill for failing to stop Blacks excesses could run to hundreds of
millions of dollars.

As the report makes clear, the claims against Black may well bankrupt the
peer, but money could be the least of his worries. The Securities and
Exchange Commission (SEC), Americas top financial watchdog, the state
authorities and the FBI are investigating various aspects of the Hollinger
case. A criminal lawsuit is a strong possibility and, in the current
environment, conviction would almost certainly mean jail.

Black and Radler are strongly protesting their innocence. A statement from
Ravelston, a company controlled by Black, dismissed the report as
exaggerated claims laced with outright lies. Radler described it as: a
highly inaccurate and defamatory diatribe written more like a novel than a
serious report. He said KPMG, Hollingers auditors, repeatedly reviewed and
approved the now controversial payments.


Hyslop said that Black should be treated as innocent until proven
otherwise. But if the worst came to the worst and Black was sent to jail,
I think he would thrive. He can adapt to any situation. At least wed have
a far more intelligent prison class.

WHATEVER the final outcome for Black, he and his former colleagues now
look set for years of legal skirmishes. To date Black faces:

* An investigation by the SEC that could lead to fines and a lifetime ban
from holding corporate positions;
* Investigations by the Illinois secretary of state, assisted by the FBI,
that could lead to a criminal investigation headed by Illinois's attorney-
general. A conviction could end in a prison sentence;
* A racketeering suit brought by Hollinger International, Blacks former
company, claiming $1.2 billion;
* A $300,000 writ against Black and former directors from Cardinal
Capital, an American shareholder;
* Claims against Hollinger and Black from other shareholders including the
Louisiana Teachers Pension Fund and the Washington Areas Carpenters Fund;
* Potential investigations by British and Canadian authorities into Blacks
activities outside America.

The legal fallout from the debacle will have a wide impact and take years
to settle, said Columbia University professor John Coffee, an authority on
white-collar crime.

Blacks case, he said, reminds him of the trial of Dennis Kozlowski. The
former boss of Tyco is awaiting a retrial on charges that he looted $600m
from the conglomerate. Like Black he enjoyed a lavish, company-funded
lifestyle, spending $1m on his wifes birthday bash and $6,000 on a shower
curtain for his Manhattan flat.

The Kozlowski case began with an investigation by the SEC. It then passed
its findings to Manhattans district attorney Robert Morgenthau, who
brought criminal proceedings against Kozlowski and other former Tyco
executives.

Black is already being investigated by the SEC and by authorities in
Chicago, the city Hollinger lists as its headquarters. The two will work
in tandem and the SEC is almost bound to bring legal action against Black,
said Coffee.

The Hollinger Chronicles, as the report is known, was compiled by Richard
Breeden, a former chairman of the SEC, and contains such damning
accusations that the SEC, I am sure, will proceed against him, said
Coffee.

Should Black be found guilty, the SEC can fine him, demand he repay money
and ban him for life from holding office in an American company. But the
watchdogs powers are civil, not criminal.

It will ultimately be up to Illinois's attorney-general, Lisa Madigan, to
decide whether criminal charges will be brought against the peer.
Kozlowskis trial will weigh heavily on the mind of any prosecutor. In
almost all respects this is a case that is similar to Tyco, said Coffee.
And that one started unravelling all over the place the minute it got to
court.

Kozlowskis trial was heralded by headline-grabbing examples of his excess
and gross spending sprees. The trial proved far less spectacular, with the
jury worn down by mindnumbing and complex arguments.

I think this report could well result in indictments, but its not a slam
dunk, said Coffee. He expects prosecutors to begin working on former
Hollinger directors to turn against Black and act as witnesses for the
prosecution. Flipping witnesses, as its known, has been particularly
successful in securing convictions against executives of Enron, the energy
firm that imploded in one of Americas biggest scandals.

James Cox, law professor at Duke University, said Breedens report looks
too damning for Black to escape criminal prosecution. If Breeden is right,
then it seems that this was not a question of poor judgment, but of
scheming and design, he said. He reckoned that prosecutors would identify
one or two areas where they believe the evidence is strongest and attack
Black on those charges rather than going to trial with a long list of
accusations, as happened in the first Tyco case.

Last April, that case ended in mistrial after six months in court and two
weeks of jury deliberation. Prosecutors are to bring the case back to
court and are expected to trim down their charges after the successful
prosecution of two other fallen business stars.

Complexity was a potential problem in the trial of Frank Quattrone, a
former star banker at Credit Suisse First Boston. Quattrone was the
biggest banker of the dotcom era and made millions for his clients from
share sales in companies that subsequently collapsed, costing the
investing public and pensioners billions in lost savings. Prosecutors
side-stepped getting involved in a complex securities case and instead
pursued Quattrone, successfully, for obstruction of justice. Martha
Stewart, the media queen, was also convicted on obstruction charges after
an investigation of insider-dealing charges--something that is very hard
to prove.

Hollinger and Black's affairs are about as tangled as they come. The peer
controlled the Telegraph empire through a network of holding companies,
had significant operations in Britain and Canada as well as the United
States, and banked many of his most controversial payments in Bermuda.

With the successful prosecution of Stewart and Quattrone on simpler
charges, Chicagos prosecutors may be tempted to follow a similar solution,
say legal experts. They say Blacks past behaviour has left him vulnerable
to such an attack one that could avoid the complexities involved in
Breedens report, but could still land the peer in jail.

IN the early 1980s, Black was feeling socially and politically stifled in
his native Canada. A lifelong Amerophile, he set his sights on making his
debut in business across the border. An ideal candidate was found in Hanna
Mining, a company whose largest shareholders were some of Americas most
well-connected families, including the Humphrey family George Humphrey
was President Eisenhowers secretary of the Treasury.

The foray ended in legal action between Black and Hanna. Court documents
relate that the Humphreys were assured that Black's intentions were
friendly and in 1981 the Humphreys approved the sale of 4.9% of Hanna to
Norcen, a company Black chaired.

In filings with the SEC this stake was described by Norcen as an
investment position and purchased for investment. But minutes from a board
meeting described a more aggressive scenario: the ultimate purpose of the
investment was a takeover. Months later, Black launched a hostile bid.
Hanna hit back hard, accusing Black and Norcen of fraud and racketeering.

Black spent 20 hours in the witness box over four days, but despite
impressing both judge and prosecutor with his oratory, he lost the case.
The judge called Black's reading of events strained and unpersuasive.

After an SEC investigation of the case, Black signed a consent decree in
1982 in which he pledged not to break any of the rules and regulations
surrounding publicly traded companies. A consent decree is a court order,
and breaching it is a criminal offence.

Breedens report alleged that Black filed documents with the SEC that
contained false statements, or omitted to include material information on
numerous occasions.

Breeden claimed the SEC was not informed about tens of millions of dollars
paid to Black, Radler and others regarding fees and other forms of
compensation or related party transactions ... For example, the
compensation table in Hollingers proxy statements does not show Black and
Radler as receiving any compensation from Hollinger as their share of
$226m in management fees between 1996 and 2003. In an average year,
Hollinger failed to disclose in its proxy statement as much as 96% of the
compensation the committee believes was received by its top five officers,
reported Breeden.

Piling on the detail, Breeden reported that Black and Radler caused
Hollinger to make $15.6m in non-competition styled payments in 2000 and
2001 to themselves and two associates without any review by or approval
from the Audit Committee or the Board. The Special Committee accuses Black
and others of creating sham transactions, the deliberate backdating of
checks and concealment of the unauthorised payments and says the payments
were not fully disclosed to the SEC.

If the hotly disputed allegations were proven true, Black would be in
clear breach of the consent decree.

FOR Black and his former colleagues the party is over, and the headaches
have only just begun.

Under Black, board meetings operated more like a social club or
public-policy association than as the board of a major corporation,
according to Breedens report.

Black talked world affairs with Henry Kissinger and Richard Perle, the
former Pentagon defence adviser. A good lunch followed the short meetings
and never did the board query Black or his spending. Black and Radler
bought newspaper titles from Hollinger, sometimes for as little as $1, and
added them to their own private companies. The board appears to have
failed to ask if this was as good a deal for Hollinger as it appeared to
be for Black.

According to Breedens report, Black contributed to his board members
charities and invested in businesses they were tied to. In the case of
Perle, who at one point sat on Hollingers compensation committee,
Hollinger awarded him millions in bonuses and even picked up his grocery
bills at least until Black started querying Perles expenses.

Those close ties and the boards silence will come at a price, said Laura
Jereski, analyst at Tweedy Browne, a Hollinger shareholder and the first
to blow the whistle on Black. The company is threatening a lawsuit unless
Hollinger pursues its present and former directors for allegedly allowing
Black to allegedly loot the company.

Cardinal, another shareholder, is already demanding $300m in restitution
from this rich and powerful board. Both Tweedy and Cardinal are likely to
press for a settlement if they dont get one then Blacks former friends
face embarrassing days in court.

Jereski said she was impressed with the Breeden report, before adding: Its
one thing writing about what happened. But for me the finger wagging is
less interesting than what gets done about it.

 http://business.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,8209-1246866,00.html

Excerpt from Lord Black: The Biography by George Tombs

 link to www.canada.com
 link to www.canada.com
Windsor Star and Montreal Gazette

September 2, 2004
CHAPTER SEVEN: THE CROWN JEWEL

Conrad Black, by 1985, was a master at hobnobbing with the rich and famous
and the politically powerful. He was an accomplished insider at the
secretive Bilderberg conferences and the Trilateral Commission.

But he did not feel involved in world events. His business interests -
with the exception of his newspaper interests - bored him. His involvement
with grocery stores, mining, petroleum, farm machinery and the like served
only one purpose. "I was in those solely for the reason of making some
money out of them," he says. "Restructuring them, or managing them up and
selling or trading them, or doing something financially 'preferably a bit
innovative' with them."

Ever since Black had run the Eastern Townships Advertiser and the
Sherbrooke Record in the 1960s, newspapers had appealed to him, and he had
picked up a few in provincial Canadian backwaters. But his dream of
becoming a press baron on a grand scale had been thwarted.

In 1979, he had been blocked by Kenneth Thomson in his quest to gain
control of FP Publications, an important Canadian newspaper group.

Over the years, at Bilderberg conferences, Black occasionally discussed
the prospect of investing in a British newspaper with Andrew Knight,
editor of The Economist and a member of the Bilderberg steering committee.
Black had always admired Canadian press barons who made it in London.

Lord Beaverbrook, from New Brunswick, had made a fortune through
newspapers. He'd served as a minister in British cabinets in both world
wars and vigorously promoted the Empire Crusade - an attempt to increase
trade within the Commonwealth. He was even mentioned in the newsreel
sequence of Citizen Kane as a newspaper power to be reckoned with.

Black had closely studied Kenneth Thomson's father Roy, admiring the way
this astute but modest man from northern Ontario watched the balance
sheet. But there was an obvious difference in style between Beaverbrook,
the hands-on propagandist, and Thomson, the cool operator who had made a
fortune in broadcasting and North Sea oil, then used it to subsidize The
Times. Thomson considered the take-over to have been "the summit of a
lifetime's work."

Even to this day, long after Thomson's death, Brian MacArthur, associate
editor of The Times says: "I bless Roy Thomson's name. He hired excellent
editors, spent money, didn't interfere, and let us journalists get on with
it-something like the New York Times, the Washington Post or the Toronto
Globe and Mail. All Thomson cared about was the number of classified ads,
and giving journalists the resources to do their job."

Beaverbrook and Thomson Sr. had been Fleet Street giants, sending
journalists around the world to report on events that mattered, setting a
high standard for eye-witness news-gathering as much as for writing. They
dominated the world's most competitive newspaper market and that
commanding position gave them access to highest royalty and to politicians
from mayors to prime ministers. They were sometimes asked to quietly
smother stories, but also often had a hand in choosing the country's
political leadership. Britain is a country with no written constitution,
where the chain of command within the government - even in the planning of
nuclear war - was subject to interpretation, based on historical
precedents, and there was usually an informal, gentlemanly character to
political decision-making. The press barons were a formidable, articulate
alternative to the government.

Moreover, a strong majority in the British parliament could result in
democratic tyranny. "Particularly in our constitution," said Lord
Carrington, "press barons play an important role in Britain where if you
have a very big majority in the House of Commons, there are no checks and
balances. The House of Lords doesn't matter, and the House of Commons
really doesn't matter, because if you have a big majority, the followers
always go with the premiers - well, nearly always."

"Newspapers influence the outcomes of elections," said Lord Hattersley, a
former minister in the Labour governments of Harold Wilson and James
Callaghan, and a noted journalist. "In a free society, it just happens.
Journalists have to be accepted as part of the democratic process. People
in political office complaining about journalists are like sailors
complaining about the sea."

The British government draws press lords into the circle of power by using
the honours system, the often cynical award of noble titles-one of "the
most potent pieces of patronage in a premier's hands," according to
constitutional authority Peter Hennessy. A peerage transforms newspaper
proprietors into legislators, with the power to debate and vote on bills
sent up to the House of Lords from the House of Commons. This fudges their
role, from the observation of events and the shaping of public opinion to
participation in decision-making. They are proprietors, marketing facts
and ideas on a grand scale. But they are statesmen too - with a political
platform of their own in and outside of Parliament.

In May 1985 came an opportunity that would change Black's life.

At the Bilderberg meeting at Arrowwood, outside New York, Andrew Knight
told Black that The Daily Telegraph was undergoing severe financial and
managerial strain. The paper was the English-speaking world's
largest-circulation conservative broadsheet. It dated from 1855, the time
of the Crimean War. Black's great-grandfather Robert Thomas Riley was the
son of one of the founding shareholders. Since the late 1920s, the
Telegraph had been controlled by the Berry family, industrious Welsh
entrepreneurs with a history of coming to the rescue of faltering
companies and then building up durable value. Bill Berry, the first Lord
Camrose and one of the pre-war giants of Fleet Street, had promoted high
standards of reporting at The Telegraph. He had the good sense to oppose
fascism throughout the 1930s (unlike his competitor Lord Rothermere at The
Daily Mail) and had even employed Winston Churchill as a freelance
contributor before the Second World War. The Telegraph broke the one
million circulation barrier in April 1947 - a net daily sale of 108,000
more copies than The New York Times and The New York Herald Tribune
combined. But Camrose's son Michael - Lord Hartwell - a deaf and extremely
shy man prone to mumbling, did not have much entrepreneurial flair.

His mission was to preserve the value and style of his late father in the
newspaper's executive offices on the fifth floor of 135 Fleet St. "Just as
he kept his own offices unchanged, with their 1930s panelling and their
ancient Telegraph contents bills for decoration, so he maintained his
father's routines to the letter," wrote Duff Hart-Davis, the Telegraph
historian. "A butler dressed in black still guarded the entrance to the
fifth floor." Staff members of the old school snapped to attention when
they spoke to Hartwell on the telephone.

Hart-Davis explained that Hartwell maintained an antiquated system of
management, surrounding himself with venerable gentlemen like himself, and
had done little to prepare the next generation - his sons Adrian and
Nicholas Berry - for administrative roles. Adrian was more interested in
science than administration. Nicholas had shown a keen business sense, but
had not been prepared for succession.

Besides, in the midst of rapid technological change on Fleet Street, and
an ongoing war of attrition between newspaper proprietors and print
unions, Hartwell had made a catastrophic mistake - committing to costly
new printing installations in the East London's Docklands on the basis of
overly optimistic projections without properly evaluating the financial
risks. The new presses would offer financial benefits to the paper, but
the Telegraph did not have the financial depth needed to pull it off
without new capital. After lengthy negotiations with several banks during
1984, "a consortium led by Security Pacific, and including the National
Westminster County Bank, the Hong Kong and Shanghai Bank and Wardley
London, agreed to put up 75 million on condition that the Telegraph raised
29 million from the sale of shares." Given the precarious financial
position of the company, N.M. Rothschild & Sons was having trouble raising
the 29 million.

"The Telegraph was bankrupt effectively," says Knight, "and it couldn't
raise the money it needed to finance its new presses, let alone survive.
Rothschild could not raise all the money needed, so I contacted Black with
a view to having him invest in the paper. I had two candidates in mind,
Conrad or Kay Graham. I went to Conrad because he was more ideologically
attuned to the Telegraph and, unlike Kay, was not a friend of the Berry
family, so future muddles would be avoided if and when he got control."

The Telegraph was the Crown Jewel of the British press. As Black later
wrote, "the key to the Daily Telegraph's immense success was a formula
devised by Lord Camrose and faithfully continued by his son, Lord
Hartwell, consisting of an excellent, fair, concise, informative
newspaper; good sports coverage; a page three in which the kinkiest,
gamiest, most salacious and most scatalogical stories in Britain were set
out in the most apparently sober manner, but with sadistically explicit
quotations from court transcripts; and extreme veneration of the Royal
Family."

Beyond the quality and prestige of the title, Black was also interested in
the political platform that ownership, even partial ownership, would offer
--a platform in a world capital, more than just a cut above Toronto.
There was a charming, faded elegance to London, with its palaces and
hotels, the bulky black Carbodies cabs and double-deckers lumbering by,
the trotting procession of the Horse Guards and richly liveried staff in
the clubs. London was a layered city, a visual feast for a history buff
like Black.

There was also the impressive literary tradition of British journalism.

Bill Deedes (now Lord Deedes), a former editor of The Daily Telegraph, had
been a war correspondent during the Italian invasion of Ethiopia in the
1930s (and a character in Evelyn Waugh's Scoop), a parliamentary secretary
in Sir Winston Churchill's post-war government and a cabinet minister
under Harold MacMillan. In the 1970s and 1980s, following in the footsteps
of Waugh and George Orwell, came a series of adventurers and unusually
gifted men - Reuters correspondent Anthony Grey, who was held hostage for
two years during the Chinese Cultural Revolution as a symbol of the paper
tigers of capitalism; war correspondent Max Hastings who sometimes scooped
the opposition by taking a taxi to the front; John Pilger, a rugged
Australian whose life mission was to denounce every abuse of power (he
attacked the manufacturers of thalidomide as willingly as he blasted Henry
Kissinger for the indiscriminate American bombing of civilian Cambodia
during the 1970s); Robert Fisk who risked his life time and again
reporting from Lebanon and throughout the Middle East; and Reuters man
Andrew Tarnowski who became a temporary captive of the Amal militia in
Beirut so he could interview hostages from the 1985 TWA hijacking and
scoop the world's media.

Black relished the negotiating process; the opportunity of gaining The
Telegraph at a bargain price and releasing the locked-up value."You have
all the different elements there," said Black. "You have possible economic
gain, you have human drama, you sometimes have the abrupt and almost cruel
end of long-standing incumbency, and the rise of new interests, which I
suppose I myself represented. You have the unfolding drama, and you are
conscious at all times of being in the midst of the drama, whose outcome
is hoped-for, but there is a great deal of suspense as you get into these
things. A lot of nervous energy is put into it." But Black recognized the
risks as well.

Excerpted from Lord Black: The Biography by George Tombs.
Copyright 2004 by City Publishing Inc. www.optimumpublishing.com all
rights reserved.
This book will be available across Canada Sept. 13.

 link to www.canada.com
 link to www.canada.com



---
 http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/channel.cfm?channelid=46&contentid=2612
 http://www.conspiracyplanet.com/channel.cfm?channelid=46&contentid=2612&page=2

Conrad, The Black Lord Hiding In Canada 02.Dec.2005 14:57

more

Conrad, The Black Lord Hiding In Canada

Toronto Street News
12-2-2005


As an international pretender and wannabe lord, Conrad hosted the Bilderberger meeting which took place in King Township north of Toronto on (Canadian Imperial Bank of Canada) CIBC's "leadership" convention grounds. This was more proof of the existence of the New World Order.

Black started with a million or so of his dead father's money. -- He had an early start at the millionaire's school: Upper Canada College. Recognizing and understanding the lawlessness of homosexual advances by the teachers in that institution (whose convictions are still being recorded at this date), he decided to steal the grade 13 examination papers which he subsequently sold to his pals. He was caught.

He claimed to memorize the dictionary, especially the big words he could utilize to impress cultured company and studied global elites for their secrets. This enabled him to rub elbows with the rich while the Canadian public watched aghast as he was viewed simply as a poseur.

With the family inheritance, he bought an existing Quebec daily and learned how to strip the fat from the day-to-day operation, then went on to bigger fish.

He went through the Protestant E.P. Taylor crowd managing to take over his giant Canadian multinational when Taylor died. A CBC series entitled 'Titans' exposed his oily activities when the elderly widows of the Argus Corp. were shown a sheaf of papers to sign as Black was acting on legal behalf of the company. They didn't understand the fine points hidden in the documents they signed, giving control - by proxy - of shares to Black who then controlled the corporation with a tiny pittance of shares owned by himself. E.P. Taylor had planned Toronto's modern Don Mills subdivision. Taylor retired to the Bahamas to start his own island enclave for the super rich.

The Argus conglomerate owned multinationals like Massey-Harris-Ferguson farm equipment, Sifto Salt, Dominion Stores, etc. that were household brand names in Canada.

He gave his less aware brother Montagu (deceased) the Dominion store chain which was closing stores due to the cost of paying its union members proper wages. Everyone in Canada became aware of Black as he "withdrew" $39 million from their pension fund. Years later he was forced to repay about $43 million at a time when mortgage interest rates were in the area of 10%. $39 million invested in mortgages for 4 years would have earned over $15 million. The Ontario Securities Commission and/or other government financial overseers failed to act decisively and promptly.

He was getting better and better at using other people's money but the pastures were turning black behind him and he had to look for new ground as a lot of people were now onto his gambit.

Black's associates over the years were extensive, including the Catholic Church's Cardinal Carter. Church associates were conned by his presence and he used to brag about having a Cardinal's thrown in his home and then inviting people in to see it...and Cardinal Carter would be actually sitting in it.

Carter was known to go fishing with real estate chiefs in the Toronto area. Conrad was only to glad to buddy-up to someone who was not Protestant by now.

However, in an interview with a security guard of Black's, Toronto Street News asked whether Con still read the Protestant King James, version of the bible as opposed to the Catholic bible.

The security guard assured me -- "No, Conrad still goes upstairs to read the King James version."

Conrad continued to aspire to nobility - even if it was an acquired title like Lord Black of Cross Harbour - writing biographies about the elite like Roosevelt in the midst of his latest and eventual financial disaster. The U.S. government seized his $9 million NY condo; he still "owns" a $30M home in Florida.

The green pastures were running out. He announced that he wasn't one of the elite who kept changing wives. It was said that he was upset because the current wife didn,'t have a first name suitable for his proposed lordship. (Shirley or something.)

So, when Maxwell, a Jewish version of Rupert Murdoch, the current global media power having lost his life, probably murdered, it was left to Black to go for the last pastureland he would ever see.

His Hollinger publishing entity now bubbled explosively once he procured a Jewish wife in the person of much-married Barbara Amiel. Now, suddenly, he was owner of the Jerusalem Post and a chain of Israeli newspapers as well as English and American papers.

Conrad was really on the world scene now.

He was now in position to ask prominent Jews like Henry Kissinger to sit on his Hollinger board along with Richard Perle...both of whom have dropped out now that Black is charged with fraud.

He had now run out of wealthy pasturelands to plunder. Is Asia next?

His appetite for nobility saw him resign his Canadian citizenship in order to acquire a lordship in England. Canada does not permit royalty titles for its citizens even for those seeking dual citizenship. Prime minister Chretien was not impressed by Black's fawning approach. -- the Black reputation was already known in Chretien's home province of Quebec.

In the 1990s, Conrad also rose in world ranking (in his eyes) when he hosted a Bilderberger conference in Toronto -- the Bilberberg convention --- wherein global elitists appear to be given the nod to become U.S. presidents, Canadian PMs, etc. This was the case for both President Carter and Clinton and the latest Canadian wanna be PM, Stephen Harper, who hasn't made it yet.

Members of the old Communist Party laughed when Black tried to put on his holier-than-thou act by seeking to acquire a new Victorian style mansion befitting his station in life. The Communist Party architect showed him the rebuilt Norman Bethune Centre. The old one was wiretapped backwards and forwards by the Mounties for decades, then it was firebombed. Conrad took one look at the new one and said-- yup he,'d like one built for himself (to chuckles by the architect).

Black advertised himself in Canada's Who's Who publication as chairman of the steering committee of the Bilderbergers. Dumbed down, --the public still insist conspiracies are theories.

Canada's own former finance minister under the Liberals, Donald Gordon, left his $6,000 membership fee receipt in the garbage can of his office -- which a Toronto Street News agent retrieved.

The very secret Bilberger meeting enjoyed the presence of royalty from Holland, Spain, etc., and a couple hundred other super rich and influential world names in banking, industry, etc.

Metro's police force were not told in advance of the arrival of the global elite and were a bit fazed when the royal limousines started arriving at the CIBC leadership retreat estate in King Township.

Only the Toronto Sun appeared to give more than a paragraph to the 1995. Sun editorialists no doubt wanted to be a part of the crowd and were awed by this group of people wielding power, gathered together to give the nod to next year's global leaders and issues...at the expense of democracy.

Prosecutor Fitzgerald should ask jurors to hear from private investors Hal Jackman and Stephen Jarislowsky, to explain why they dumped their shares in Black-controlled firms in the 1980s, having grown weary of the companies' convoluted corporate manoeuvres. And Claude Lamoureux, head of the Ontario Teachers' Pension Plan Board, could be invited to expand on his comment in The New York Times last year that "None of us had shares" in Black-related firms. "We all knew Conrad Black."

Con's henchman and fixer pled guilty to fraud (theft) earlier with a lighter sentence being introduced in the case for apparently exposing Black. A Black letter to Radler commended his henchman for the "splendid conveyance of the non-competition agreements from which you and I profited so well." Hollinger assets (newspapers) owned by public investors were reportedly sold to Black and Radler for as little as one dollar apiece.

Probably the most daunting factor for Black is that his two years' of legal gambits since his ouster have mostly failed. On the only previous occasion when witnesses were called into court on Black's behalf, in a Black bid to continue influencing Hollinger International's affairs, --a judge in business-friendly Delaware not only rejected Black's ploy, accusing Black of "persistently and seriously" breaching his fiduciary duties to the company, but penned an extraordinary detailed judgment explaining why he believed Black was not a credible witness.

Tuesday, this week Toronto Street News agent spotted Conrad at the Windsor Arms' hotel with about 10 "friends" in tow. The Windsor Arms has hosted international celebrities in the past like adulterers Richard Burton and Liz Taylor. They have also hosted mafia types from Montreal hiding out from the heat. Black is following in the rut it appears.

 http://www.rense.com/general69/blacklord.htm