portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article announcements portland metro

actions & protests | animal rights

International Day for Korean Dogs and Cats Help us Educate Portlanders

On July 15, 2005, IDA and other animal protection groups will hold worldwide protests to coincide with the first of Korea's "Bok days," which literally means the hot, dog days of summer. South Korea's dog meat consumption increases during this time of year because some superstitiously believe they can keep cool by eating animals that do not sweat. Some Korean men - apparently insecure about their masculinity - even gather in groups to violently beat and hang dogs to death in hopes that consuming the tortured animals' flesh will make them more virile.
What: Education Outreach for Korean Dogs and Cats
Where: Pioneer Courthouse Square, Portland, OR
Meet at the corner of Broadway and Yamhill (in front of Nordstrom's)
When: Friday, July 15th
Time: 12:00 noon - 2:00 pm


IDA will supply literature and posters.


Although consumption of dogs and cats is technically illegal in South Korea, the Government doesn't enforce the law. In fact, they are trying to effectively legalize it by regulating dog meat sanitation, which amounts to endorsement of the torment and killing of millions of dogs and cats. The Government's stamp of approval is particularly indefensible given that the vast majority of Koreans find the consumption of dogs and cats disgusting, and are ashamed that the practice has not yet been banned in their country.

Demonstrations are being organized in the U.S., Canada, Korea, Ireland, Argentina and other countries. Visit  http://idausa.org/campaigns/korea/index.html to see if a demonstration is being organized in your area.

If you cannot attend an event, write letters to the editor just before July 15th stating that protests are taking place around the world in a day of observance for Korean cats and dogs in opposition to their consumption. Also write to Korean Ambassador Hong Seok-Hyun urging enforcement of laws prohibiting dog and cat torture and slaughter.

Ambassador Hong Seok-Hyun
Embassy of the Republic of Korea
2450 Massachusetts Ave. N.W.
Washington, DC 20008
Tel.: (202) 939-5600
Fax: (202) 797-0595
E-mail:  korinfo@koreaemb.org


Visit www.idausa.org/campaigns.html for more information.


Contact Connie at 503-249-9996 x3 or by email at  connie@idausa.org for more information.
... 13.Jul.2005 15:45

botey

I absolutely think it's important to try to stop the torture of animals. However, when it comes to meat consumption I'm not comfortable with singling out dogs and cats (which is tempting for me to do because I have personal relationships wiht them) when so many other animals are being killed for consumption (cows, buffalo, chickens, turkeys,lambs, pigs, etc.) . And I'm particularly uncomfortable with singling another culture's use of meat when there are so many factory farms in the U.S. I think educating people about the abuse of animals in our own meat industry seems like an obvious starting point regarding this cause.

chomp 13.Jul.2005 15:45

hypocrite

so, they can eat cows, chickens, rabbits, and pigs, but not dogs?

i don't see why we don't eat dogs. pigs are just as intelligent and we chow down on them. if i can eat a sad-eyed cow, i can definately eat a dog.

Contradictions 13.Jul.2005 16:49

Tom

I agree with the two previous commentators, that by single out only cats and dogs to be exempted from human consumption, will open the valid counter argument that we are simply culturally biased. In fact, North Americans are not in the strong position to criticize others, when we casually slaughtering millions of animals of other species after they being bred and kept in industrial and cruel conditions.

bogus generalizations about Koreans? 14.Jul.2005 23:12

anon

The original post contains these passages:

"South Korea's dog meat consumption increases during this time of year because some superstitiously believe they can keep cool by eating animals that do not sweat. Some Korean men - apparently insecure about their masculinity - even gather in groups to violently beat and hang dogs to death in hopes that consuming the tortured animals' flesh will make them more virile."

AND

"...the vast majority of Koreans find the consumption of dogs and cats disgusting, and are ashamed that the practice has not yet been banned in their country."


I have not traveled in Korea and cannot comment on these claims directly. The claim about Korean men "insecure about their masculinity" getting their kicks out of torturing dogs sure smacks of an urban legend. I have, however, spent time in the majority-ethnic-Korean part of China that neighbors North Korea, including in an area that gets tourists from South Korea, and I can tell you that dog meat is a common menu item. (I read enough Chinese to know this.) As I am quite sure that I saw dog meat on the menu in restaurants catering to South Korean tourists, I am therefore skeptical about the statement that "the vast majority of Koreans find the consumption of dogs and cats disgusting." I find it disgusting, but then that's the norm in American culture, right?

the obvious place to start 16.Jul.2005 09:21

baffled

i think it is obvious that the natural place for u.s. animal rights people to start educating/protesting about the treatment of animals used for food (or any other frivolous reason) (and they all are frivolous) is in the u.s. but isn't it equally obvious that a group that takes the time to care about animals in another country probably does participate in a myriad of activities in their own? also, i don't think it is ethnocentric to say that it is wrong for people to gather together to viciously beat and hang groups of dogs to death. and of course it isn't just becaue they are dogs that i feel that way!

suggestion 16.Jul.2005 15:58

.....

Instead of criticizing IDA (In Defense of Animals - a local AR group) for focusing on dogs & cats instead of farm animals, how about if we thank them for the fact that they are out doing *something* instead of nothing at all. And don't just jump to the conclusion that IDA doesn't educate people about farm animal horrors, because they do. They do KFC demonstrations, foie gras protests, etc. So let's thank them for doing this. Thank you IDA! And remember - it's important to speak out about ANY animal abuse issue, whether it's dogs, cows, geese, whatever, because if you increase a person's awareness about a particular issue, chances are you can then discuss with them how it relates to other issues, for example - if you talk to someone who has a dog about the dogs being eaten in Korea, that person will likely be horrified, then you can talk to them about how similar it is with pigs, cows, etc. Any action done for animals is worthwhile.