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National Anthem Meltdown

As a true liberal that despises extreme forms of nationalism, I found this example to be just one of the many that make people cringe when flag waving hyper-patriotic freaks come around.
Video Of Incident
Video Of Incident
Last night, I was listening to Lars Larson, national right-wing radio host, and he was discussing just a topic. He told of a story out of New Jersey, about a crazed screaming teacher from New Jersey. The story goes, the teacher went ape crazy when a student refused to stand during the National Anthem. After yelling at the student to stand, the teacher kicked his chair out from under him, which left the child storming from the classroom.

The funny part of this whole ordeal is the teacher was caught on a camera phone having his morning anthem meltdown. Watching the video, it is clear that the teacher is shouting during the recording of the National Anthem, miring any insignificant noise within the room. And they say liberal are angry.

There is no doubt that the teacher is extremely agitated over the lack of attention showed by many students, but is violence necessary? If this "patriot" had so much respect for our country and it's existence, maybe he would have taken the time to read the Constitution, which in fact protects the rights of an individual to remain seated during the recitation of the Anthem.

Likewise, if children were causing such a disturbance, he should have paused the recording and dispatched them from the room. Yelling, screaming and violence is no way to celebrate our country's heritage. Furthermore, forcing people to respect by violence and dominance is no way to encourage them. After all, if that were the case, we may still be a British Colony.

BTW: The State of New Jersey is moving to ban the use of camera phones. Go figure
Bring your camera everywhere you go... 03.Mar.2005 16:52

Beefy Nineteen

Good point about, "forcing people to respect by violence and dominance". I don't understand how fear can bring about respect. These two words -- respect and fear -- seem to have become confused in our language and our culture. There was one corporate media news story I recall about a soldier who was about to wreak havoc on an Iraqi town. Wish I could find the original to give an exact quote but it was something like -- we are gonna go in and bust a few heads and *then* they will learn to respect us. Fear yes. Respect, unlikely.

As far as, "The State of New Jersey is moving to ban the use of camera phones."
That sounds like Rummy's first response to Abu Ghraib...

Hitler got the flag pledge from the USA 03.Mar.2005 17:50

.

Fascism started in the US. Fascism was exported from the US.

The US is the last remaining fascist power of the 20th century.

Hitler got the German Nazi Party Anthem from Harvard 03.Mar.2005 18:06

.

From Harvard to Hitler!!

Hitler and Ernst (Putzi) Hanfstaengl.

Putzi was Hitler's press agent and piano player. He was very close friends with FDR from their Harvard days. FDR had him released from a Canadian German Nazi POW camp and transferred to Wash, D.C. to advise him on the conduct of the war.

Putzi: Friend of Hitler and Roosevelt

Ernst "Putzi" Hanfstaengl first met Hitler at a speech he was giving in a beer hall in Munich on Nov. 22, 1922.

Putzi was sent as a quest of the American ambassador who could not attend.

Subsequently Putzi and Hitler became very close friends. Putzi was an expert piano player and his piano playing seemed to calm Hitler down.

"I took most of my meals at the Harvard Club, where I made friends with the young Franklin D. Roosevelt, at that time a rising New York State Senator, and received several invitations to visit his cousin Teddy, the former President, who had retired to his estate at Sagamore Hill. Teddy Roosevelt gave me [Putzi] a boisterous welcome and two pieces of advice which were by no means without influence on my way of thinking. "Well, Hanfstaengl," he said, "how did your military service go? I bet it did you no harm. I saw something of your [German] army at Doeberitz as the Kaiser's guest, and discipline like that never hurt anybody. No nation can degenerate which maintains those standards." I must say I found them surprising words, as Wilhelm II was not exactly making Germany popular at the time, but it was an additional prop to the idealized picture of the army inculcated by Sergeant-Major Streit. Later we got to talking about art, literature, and politics, and the ex-President came out with the phrase which has stuck with me ever since: "Hanfstaengl, your business is to pick out the best pictures, but remember that in politics the choice is that of the lesser evil." (Hanfstaengl. Hitler: The Missing Years, pp. 27-28).

Fight, Fight, Fight . . . Sieg Heil . . . Seig Heil!!

Hitler listens attentively as Ernst Hanfstaengl plays the Harvard football marches.

"Infatuated with Hanfstaengl's style, Hitler would introduce him to all his social circles as a showpiece. "Whereas he otherwise kept the different groups in watertight compartments and told no one where he was going or whom he had been talking to," recalled Hanfstaengl in his unpublished memoirs, "he dragged me around from house to house as his resident musician, and had me sit down at the piano to perform." Once at the home of the photographer Heinrich Hoffmann he began playing Harvard football marches. When he explained how cheerleaders and marching bands would stir up the crowd to almost hysterical mass shouting Hitler's interest quickened. Whereupon Hanfstaengl demonstrated on the piano how German marches could be adapted to the buoyant American beat. "That is it," exclaimed Hitler, and paraded up and down like a drum major, "that is what we need for the movement, marvelous." Hanfstaengl wrote several marches in this style for the [Nazi] SA band but his most significant contribution was the transference of the Harvard "Fight, Fight, Fight" to "Sieg Heil, Sieg Heil" (Toland, Adolf Hitler, p.135).

 http://www.reformation.org/roosevelt-and-hitler.html

... 03.Mar.2005 18:13

...

> If this "patriot" had so much respect for our country and it's existence,
> maybe he would have taken the time to read the Constitution, which in fact
> protects the rights of an individual to remain seated during the recitation
> of the Anthem.

I wouldn't stand up for the stupid thing either, but this is silly. The Constitution doesn't say anything about standing up, sitting down, music, or any of that kind of stuff. These "rights" are based in case law, not in any "reading" of the Constitution that a layman could be expected to perceive in the text. Specific case law points might be that remaining seated is a form of "speech" and that the Bill of Rights applies broadly to all public institutional behavior everywhere and not just "Congress" making "laws," which is what the text actually says. Then there's Amendment IX, which could literally mean anything.

The bad guys would love to return America to a minimalistic textual interpretation of the Constitution. We shouldn't assume a 200-year-old piece of paper is our friend when our contemporary "rights" were won through struggle by the generations in between and could easily vanish back where they came from.

evict grandma! 03.Mar.2005 18:26

she's not MY grandma ... i've got property rights!

Er, so what? Some asshole who called himself a socialist 100 years ago invented some fascist rituals that still plague us today. Therefore ... social security and minimum wage laws are evil? Our Fearless Retarded Leaders don't seem to have any trouble sorting the nationalist violence, which they like, from the social agenda, which they hate. We shouldn't either.

hitler is just a convenient illustration 03.Mar.2005 18:32

this guy really hates roosevelt

reformation.org is about demonizing the New Deal and (no kidding) reinstating Prohibition

... 04.Mar.2005 02:15

...

Bellamy's problem was nationalism and militarism, not "socialism." Calling America a socialist country is absurd. Calling it a nationalistic and militaristic country is obvious. Was Batista a "socialist"? Pinochet? Franco?

I posted something about this earlier, but it never showed up. Whether for technical or political reasons I don't know.

I like yellow 04.Mar.2005 09:59

swastika magnets

I like the new symbol of fascism, it's yellow and you see it everywhere.

You could be right ....... 04.Mar.2005 11:59

Amadeus

.....
>The Constitution doesn't say anything about standing up, sitting down, music, or any of that kind of stuff. >These "rights" are based in case law, not in any "reading" of the Constitution that a layman could be expected to >perceive in the text. Specific case law points might be that remaining seated is a form of "speech" and that the Bill of >Rights applies broadly to all public institutional behavior everywhere and not just "Congress" making "laws," which is >what the text actually says. Then there's Amendment IX, which could literally mean anything.

You could be correct but here is my take:

Students have the right to refuse to salute the flag, to recite the "Pledge of Allegiance" and/or stand for the National Anthem, if they have any conscientious objections to either of these acts. (West Virginia State Board of Education v. Barnette, 319 U.S. 624 (1943). ) School authorities may not judge whether such objections are sincere or reasonable; the First Amendment protects the expression of such beliefs, even if they are unfounded.

In 1978, a federal court struck down a section of the New Jersey statutes that required students who objected to the flag salute to stand during its recitation.(Lipp v. Morris, 579 F.2d 834 (3rd Cir. 1978). ) Thus, students may sit quietly during the flag salute. In addition, students who do not wish to participate may not be required to leave the room during the flag salute. (Frain v. Baron, 307 F. Supp. 27 (E.D.N.Y. 1969). )

Regardless, it is all good. Interpreting the U.S. Constitution is fun. It is what makes our country interesting. Some may like it, some may not. ~Amadeus


"child"? 06.Mar.2005 22:39

whatever

I just watched the video, and these students are obviously NOT "children." Why contemporary western civilization insists on infantilizing young adults into their early twenties is a mystery to me. Young people didn't put up with this kind of crap in the late sixties and early seventies, but that was a long time ago and every generation has to stand up for itself.