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forest defense

Biscuit photos, 3 of 3: Briggs

Visiting the wreckage that is known as the Briggs timber sale was the most sobering moment of my trip to the Siskiyous. Here is a place where the powers-that-be, acting through the Bush administration and the Forest Service, have had their destructive way. Everywhere were fallen cut trees.

For background story that goes with these pictures, click here.

Unit sign
Unit sign
One of the culprits, nearby
One of the culprits, nearby
"Roadside hazard clearance" (not technically clearcutting)
The mess at Briggs
The mess at Briggs
Another view
Another view
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Live, unburned trees that were cut
Live, unburned trees that were cut
more of same
more of same
Slash pile near heli-pad
Slash pile near heli-pad
Ugly view
Ugly view
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More mess
More mess
View of valley from nearby, w/towns hidden under fog
View of valley from nearby, w/towns hidden under fog
i was shocked, but i was there to shoot video footage for indymedia reporting, and i felt my emotions shut down -- as if a switch had been flipped -- so that i could stay on task. If i had acted with full honesty in that moment, i would have fallen down on my knees by one of the stumps, embraced it, and cried with sorrow and then shouted with anger, and then gone to find whoever did it so i could take out my rage with rocks and monkeywrench and fire. But i didn't do any of that. i had chosen to visit for a purpose (documentation), and i set about fulfilling it. The video will be shown around town when it's done, and it's good that i stayed focused.

But i'll be honest here: i have no disapproval whatsoever for anyone who, in the name of earth defense, and with all care for not huring any living thing, chooses to destroy property. i recently read a story in the Ecologist magazine about an event in Tasmania where over 300 pieces of logging equipment, like trucks and such, were gathered in one place so the timber industry could lobby the government there to log old growth forests. The only thing i could think was, what an incredible opportunity that was; an organized group of people could have torched them all and brought the island's timber industry to a standstill for quite some time. How could that possibly have been the wrong thing to do, if no one was hurt? Naysayers of such tactics, like you'll find among The Liberals, are property fetishists who need to get the fuck over it and choose what's really important. Is it a world where there's still some real wildness left, or a world where no one can criticize them for being "violent" (sic)? i get just sick when i think about this stuff.

Anyway, indymedia is the tactic i've chosen: the task of getting the word out, and encouraging everyone else to do the same themselves. This set of stories about the Biscuit and what i saw there is the best i can do for now. i know i haven't hit all the details that are important, so i invite other people to add them.

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