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Army hands out FREE ECSTASY!

Army handing out Soma — er, I mean — Ecstasy for traumatized Iraq veterans.
"U.S. Soldiers to Be Given Ecstasy
Back in this country, the Food and Drug Administration has given the go-ahead for soldiers traumatized by their time in Iraq and Afghanistan to be offered the party drug ecstasy to help free them of flashbacks and recurring nightmares. The soldiers would take the drug as part of an experiment to see if MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy, can treat post-traumatic stress disorder."


So, if you're poor and live in the ghetto, and have a dose of ecstasy in your pocket, and cops stop you, you're going to jail! BUT, if you're poor and live in the ghetto, and have a dose of ecstasy in your pocket, and just got back from mass slaughtering Iraqi civilians, and cops stop you, hey — it's your meds, dude!

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and your source is... 20.Feb.2005 18:32

???

it would be nice to know how you "know".

Shaking my head 20.Feb.2005 18:57

Migratory Bird

The army seriously needs more sex drugs, huh?

Bullshit 20.Feb.2005 19:48

If you want to know

what my comment is about, refer to title

I forgot I was going to post this story this Friday 20.Feb.2005 21:15

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Everytime I mentioned this story to various people I came in contact with the response was the same "wow where do I do to sign up?" (with ofcourse lots of sarcasm). I have heard that Ecstasy was originally designed for post traumatic stress.

How many dystopias have suggested creating drug addicted soldiers? In the Star Trek series there is the Jemadar dependant on "white" and in Brave New World there is Soma (from the Vedic God of moisture and a sacred drug). I think this could be a way to create a slave army. I have a better solution for post traumatic stress and that is do not create the situations that cause such trauma. Like actually create peace and work on those situations where there is social injustice. Just an idea.

news sources 20.Feb.2005 21:20

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US soldiers to receive ecstasy to fight combat trauma
Sat, 19 Feb 2005 12:16:33 -0600
Summary:

Several studies in the US are planned or are under way to investigate whether MDMA, LSD and psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, can treat conditions ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder to anxiety in terminal cancer patients.
[Posted By ShiftShapers]
By THE GUARDIAN, LONDON
Republished from Taipei Times
Soldiers traumatized by fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are to be offered the drug ecstasy to help free them of flashbacks and recurring nightmares.

US soldiers traumatized by fighting in Iraq and Afghanistan are to be offered the drug ecstasy to help free them of flashbacks and recurring nightmares.

The US food and drug administration has given the go-ahead for the soldiers to be included in an experiment to see if MDMA, the active ingredient in ecstasy, can treat post-traumatic stress disorder.

Scientists behind the trial in South Carolina think the feelings of emotional closeness reported by those taking the drug could help the soldiers talk about their experiences to therapists.

Several victims of rape and sexual abuse with post-traumatic stress disorder, for whom existing treatments are ineffective, have been given MDMA since the research began last year.

Michael Mithoefer, the psychiatrist leading the trial, said: "It's looking very promising. It's too early to draw any conclusions but in these treatment-resistant people so far the results are encouraging."

"People are able to connect more deeply on an emotional level with the fact they are safe now."

He is about to advertise for war veterans who fought in the last five years to join the study.

According to the US national center for post-traumatic stress disorder, up to 30 percent of combat veterans suffer from the condition at some point in their lives.

Known as shell shock during the first world war and combat fatigue in the second, the condition is characterized by intrusive memories, panic attacks and the avoidance of situations which might force sufferers to relive their wartime experiences.

Mithoefer said the MDMA helped people discuss traumatic situations without triggering anxiety.

"It appears to act as a catalyst to help people move through whatever's been blocking their success in therapy."

The existing drug-assisted therapy sessions last up to eight hours, during music is played.

The patients swallow a capsule containing a placebo or 125mg of MDMA—about the same or a little more than a typical ecstasy tablet.

Psychologists assess the patients before and after the trial to judge whether the drug has helped.

The study has provoked controversy, because significant doubts remain about the long-term risks of ecstasy.

Animal studies suggest that it lowers levels of the brain chemical serotonin, and some politicians and anti-drug campaigners have argued that research into possible medical benefits of illegal drugs presents a falsely reassuring message.

The South Carolina study marks a resurgence of interest in the use of controlled psychedelic and hallucinogenic drugs.

Several studies in the US are planned or are under way to investigate whether MDMA, LSD and psilocybin, the active ingredient in magic mushrooms, can treat conditions ranging from obsessive compulsive disorder to anxiety in terminal cancer patients.

 http://www.gnn.tv/headlines/1197/US_soldiers_to_receive_ecstasy_to_fight_combat_trauma

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Ecstasy on the Battlefield

Ecstasy is the drug of choice for the Pentagon. Soldiers suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder are to be given the drug as a therapy aid. Also, instead of video games based on war, the US may soon be fighting wars based on video games with robot soldiers. And, the Vikings are at the gates of the German government.

Where Do We Sign Up?

he United States government has found a new way of recruiting soldiers for the Iraq war: It's offering them ecstasy. The trick is, the soldiers only get the free drugs after they have seen enough fighting to be experiencing flashbacks, recurring nightmares and other symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder. The usually tough-to-please US Food and Drug Administration has given the experimental treatments an initial go ahead and scientists in South Carolina have quickly gotten to work. The idea is to take advantage of the touchy-feely effect ecstasy (the "happiness drug") has on people to get soldiers to open up about the trauma they have faced. In other news, the US government spends $20 billion a year on the drug war.

Chemically, ecstasy is known as MDMA and in the trials soldiers are given either the drug or a placebo and then undergo eight-hour therapy sessions during which music is played and they are encouraged to talk about their horrifying experiences. Although still in its early phase, scientists insist the results are quite positive. The team's leader is Dr. Michael Mithoefer, a South Carolina psychiatrist and longtime campaigner for the use of ecstasy in science. Mithoefer has already given ecstasy to patients who were the victims of violent crimes, including rape, and insists on the drug's positive effects in helping them to talk about and come to terms with what happened to them. There is, he says, even some evidence that ecstasy can reduce tremors in Parkinson's patients. Possibly a whole new take on the 1972 David Peel song "The Pope Smokes Dope." (2:35 p.m. CET)

Robot Soldiers

The robot soldier is coming. The United States is working on a $127 billion project, code named "Future Combat Systems," to put computerized robots on the front line of combat in the near future. Even to the untrained eye, the advantages are obvious. Not only will the robots never get cold or hungry, but nobody, with respect to Hal from "2001, A Space Odyssey," will care if they die.

The cost of the project will increase the already-bloated US Defense Department budget by 20 percent, going from $419.3 billion for 2006 to $502.3 billion for 2010, but scientists promise it will be worth it in the long run. Why? Because, they say, the costs are just temporary and in the end robots will cost much less than human soldiers. According to the New York Times, the average cost of a soldier from enlistment to death (including retirement benefits) is $4 million. Robot soldiers cost a tenth of that, or less. Plus, they can be reused over and over again.

Scientists working on the robots promise they will be able to see, think and react just like real soldiers and that over time they will become more sophisticated and more lethal. At first, they will be operated by remote control, but as they get smarter, they will also get more independent. The whole idea -- a dream of the Pentagon for over 30 years and of science fiction fans for generations -- is both uplifting (no more war dead) and terrifying (think Terminator).

For the moment, though, technology is far from creating robots a la Issac Asimov, who can think, make decisions and have a conscience. Still, robots are already proving useful in Iraq, where they are digging up roadside mines, and in Afghanistan, where they are scouring caves and arming American outposts. In April, a bomb disposal robot capable of firing 1,000 rounds a minute will be going to Baghdad, reports The New York Times. The good news is that if in 20 years the robots do go haywire and try to take over, we will know who to call -- the California governor's mansion. Of course, if America decides to do away with a certain pesky Constitutional clause, the Oval Office might, by then, be the place to call. (1:15 p.m. CET)

Long Live Denmark

The future of German politics may hinge on an oddly anachronistic political group driven by the bizarre goal of maintaining the "peculiarity of Danish life." The group calls itself the South-Schleswig Voters' Association and has its base in the windswept, cow-dotted German state of Schleswig-Holstein, located as far north as Germany goes, i.e. the Danish border. The state -- one of the 19th century's big political conundrums -- became part of federal Germany in 1945 and these few die hards want everyone to remember their true roots as Danish citizens.

On Sunday, the state will go to the polls for parliamentary elections and as it turns out, this tiny party -- consisting of about 50,000 Danish and 40,000 regional loyalists -- could be the determining factor. The vote is not merely a local matter, but has national significance. If the conservative Christian Democrats win (as they did in May in the state of North-Rhine Westphalia) they would gain control of Germany's upper house of parliament (Bundesrat). That would essentially paralyze the ruling government of German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder, a Social Democrat. A win for the Social Democrats would be a big boon for the Chancellor and boost his chances of winning a third term in 2006. Currently, the race is so close that the association, who represents a measely 4 percent of voters in the state, could tip the balance. So far, the group hasn't come out clearly on any side and is leaving politicians to bite their fingernails. (11:00 a.m. CET)


 http://service.spiegel.de/cache/international/0,1518,342290,00.html

A new recruiting 21.Feb.2005 08:58

tool

watch out now, the military is getting sneaky..........................

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