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Rural Washington Citizens Mourn Dead U.S. Troops and Iraqi’s on Inaguration Day

On Thursday, January 20, soon after George Bush was inaugurated in Washington D.C. citizens of the town of Twisp in North Central Washington gathered to mourn the dead U.S. solders and Iraqi's by erecting a ceremonial grave yard in the town commons.
On Thursday, January 20, soon after George Bush was inaugurated in Washington D.C. citizens of the town of Twisp in North Central Washington gathered to mourn the dead U.S. solders and Iraqi's by erecting a ceremonial grave yard in the town commons. Crosses and Crescents were set up and pictures of dead and maimed U.S. troops and Iraqi citizens were pinned to the wooden grave markers.

A variety of sentiments were shared at the somber creation of the cemetery including sorrow over needless loss of life and anger with the government that has forced this violence upon the world.

After a brief interchange between citizens and one of the town's two police officers, the activity was allowed to continue unhindered. The cemetery will be up for 24 hours for all interested to view and pay their respects

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why this is important 21.Jan.2005 20:25

regular reader

 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Twisp%2C_Washington

that link is about the town of twisp, and this story is important because a small rural town acted out against its government. i think it is important that people are protesting as communities.

i think this story is more important than the reports of 4000 in seattle or portland, because those 4000 have little in common with each other, they do not care about the same things, people quelled together en masse (safety in numbers) to offhandedly voice their dissent. how many of those four thousand will see each other tomorrow and still be working on the same things as a community.

communities are important, not protests. protests arent working. we need to find common things within our communities band together as people and watch this shit tumble over and die. and this shit is the police, the military, the government, the stripping of rights, the lack of respect for animals (including humans), etc etc.

the people that protest in large demonstrations do not do much for a community, they may do something for a scene though, but i wont get into that. i commend the folks of twisp that banded together, this will probably make the twisp community newspaper, and it probably wont be so mischaracterized as the corporate media often does.

this will hit the twisp paper and all 438 households there. the neighbours will see bill and betty from down the street, nancy from next door, and tom from across town talking to gretchen (the police officer) and say, wow, thats great. (these names were made up)

do people see what i am getting at? it is people that matter, it is our lives that matter, and for anything to change we must be dedicated to our community and the perseverance and freedom and safety of that. our strength is our acceptance that we arent just fighting for ourselves, that we are fighting for the people around us.

thank you twisp washington residents for posting this news, it is amazingly inspiring.

direct democracy 22.Jan.2005 11:54

gr@ce

It is so inspiring to hear this story. It is mostly true that protests are for the scene (it LOOKS that way, when you see the same people doing the same things, actions speak louder than words). But for some people, it's about doing what they care about & not worrying wether it's hip or not. I agree with the regular reader. There's more to be done. Protests should be a complement of the product of community. Not the final product. It is nice to see familiar faces in the street or at the grocery, so maybe if they all got together...