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Siskiyou Wild Rivers News

It has been a week of dramatic ups and downs for the wild Siskiyou. We started the week with a victory in court that prevents unrestrained motorized access into the Kalmiopsis Wilderness. We end the week, however, with a huge threat to thousands of acres of old-growth reserves affected by the Biscuit fire. Read on to learn more!
Old Growth Reserve
Old Growth Reserve
In this issue:

1. Action Alert: Old-Growth Forest Reserves at Risk!

2. Gordon Smith's Lawless Logging Rider Update

3. Alleman Case Victory

4. Headwaters Forest Conference

5. Siskiyou Ecology: The Golden-Crowned Kinglet





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1. Action Alert: Old-Growth Forest Reserves at Risk!






photo: An old-growth reserve near Fiddler Mountain now at risk of logging. Photo (c) Barbara Ullian



The 9th Circuit Court of Appeals has lifted a temporary restriction on logging old-growth reserves in the Biscuit timber sale. With some logging ongoing, this decision opens the floodgates for seven more timber sales, threatening thousands of acres of wild forests surrounding the world class Kalmiopsis Wilderness Area.



The Biscuit fire burned through many reserves that are home to ancient trees that have experienced fire for millennia. In total, the Bush Forest Service is planning to log 6,300 acres of these old-growth reserves as part of the ironically named "Biscuit Fire Recovery Project." Old-growth reserves are special places normally set aside from logging to provide a safety net of habitat for sensitive wildlife like the Northern Spotted Owl.



Take action today! ­ Contact Governor Kulongoski and Senator Wyden and ask them to:


1. Conserve a national treasure by publicly urging the Forest Service to cancel these old-growth reserve timber sales.

2. Protect salmon, clean water, wildlife and recreation economies by opposing logging in old-growth reserves.

3. Support the permanent protection of the Siskiyou Wild Rivers Area as a National Conservation Area to conserve of the most botanically rich ecosystems in the world.



Call or write today!



Senator Ron Wyden

Portland: (503) 326-7525

Washington DC: 1-800-839-5276 (capitol switchboard ­ ask for Wyden¹s office)

700 NE Multnomah St. Suite 450

Portland, OR 97232



Governor Ted Kulongoski

Phone: (503) 378-4582

160 State Capitol, 900 Court Street

Salem, Oregon 97301-4707





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2. Gordon Smith's Lawless Logging Rider Update


Thanks to thousands of calls, emails and electronic faxes from people like you, Oregon Senator Gordon Smith failed to pass his lawless logging rider through Congress at the end of 2004.



Despite his defeat, we knew Gordon Smith might try to attach his lawless logging rider on appropriations bills in 2005. In coming weeks, Congress could vote on bills funding the war in Iraq and relief for Asian Tsunami victims. While it is hard to believe Senator Smith would exploit either the war or the deaths of tsunami victims to push taxpayer-subsidized deficit logging of roadless forests and old-growth reserves, we must be vigilant.



Stay tuned - your help may be needed again to stop Gordon Smith's lawless logging rider from increasing fire risk, polluting salmon rivers, degrading economic resources and spoiling our wild Siskiyou.



MORE INFO:

Gordon Smith's lawless logging rider would push chainsaws through thousands of acres of old-growth reserves, roadless forests and Wild & Scenic River watersheds - all at huge taxpayer expense, and without enforceable environmental safeguards. By legislating the entire Biscuit fire logging project, it would lock courthouse doors so that the government could violate environmental protection laws without accountability.





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3. Alleman Case Victory


It is nice to have good news in challenging times - and that is precisely what we received on Monday. Carl Alleman, owner of a "grandfathered" mining claim in the Siskiyou National Forest, has tried for years to get unrestrained motorized access to build a destination resort in the protected Kalmiopsis Wilderness for. On Monday, a federal magistrate prevented Alleman from achieving this terrible goal.



The judge ruled that because the Kalmiopsis was protected in 1964 by the original Wilderness Act, it is clear that no permanent roads or historic rights-of-way existed in the area. Further, the judge ruled that anyone disputing this fact would have had to file a lawsuit within the twelve-year statute of limitations. Alleman should have filed his case by 1976 - instead, he filed in 1999.



While it is important that the spectacular, botanically-rich Kalmiopsis Wilderness remain protected from motorized vehicles and unbridled development, this case may also help protect threatened roadless areas across the country by setting a national precedent. It is expected that Alleman will appeal the ruling, so the story is not entirely over yet!





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4. Headwaters Forest Conference


Mark your calendars for the annual Headwaters Forest Conference in Ashland, Oregon. In addition to workshops and hikes, this year's conference will include keynote addresses by Adriana Hoffman, founder of Defensores del Bosque Chileno, and Diego Andres Garcia, an activist with the Friends of Clayoquot Sound.



"Beyond Boundaries: Protecting Public, Industrial, and Private Forests Throughout the Americas"



January 28th to 30th

Ashland Springs Hotel, Ashland, Oregon



For more information, or to register online, go to: www.headwaters.org






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5. Siskiyou Ecology: The Golden-Crowned Kinglet






Though the golden-crowned kinglet (Regulus satrapa) is a common forest bird, it is not well known. The name "Regulus" means "little king" - a fitting name for this tiny yellow and red crowned bird.



Weighing just five grams - about the same as two pennies - this miniature bird thrives in cold climates. Surviving nights as cold as -40 degrees Fahrenheit is an impressive achievement for such a small warm-blooded animal. In addition to fluffing their warm insulating feathers, kinglets eat all day long in the winter to keep their metabolic fires burning. They keep their uninsulated feet cold, perhaps near freezing, to reduce heat loss. In addition, they huddle together in winter shelters and lower their body temperatures overnight to survive.



Despite their adaptations to frigid weather, golden-crowned kinglets experience a high level of winter mortality. As a species, kinglets compensate for this by producing many offspring. Kinglets produce eight to eleven eggs per clutch - so many that they have to be stacked on top of each other in their tiny nests!



As soon as the young can stay warm without their mother, the female bird leaves her young to be fed and raised by her male partner and lays a second clutch of eggs in a second nest. Called "double-clutching," this ambitious parenting technique keeps both birds busy.



Kinglets prefer thick conifer forests. In the Siskiyou, the younger forests created after natural fires can be excellent habitat for these amazing birds.





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Siskiyou Project

9335 Takilma Road, Cave Junction, OR 97523

(541) 592-4459

www.siskiyou.org



Siskiyou Project - campaign office

917 SW Oak, Suite 407, Portland, OR 97205

(503) 222-6101



Protecting the world-class Siskiyou Wild Rivers area for future generations of all species.

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