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2 Bio-Diesel/Veg Oil Orientations & 2 Workshops coming up!!!

Learn more than ever and meet new people!! They are posted on the Calendar too!
OREGON BIO-DIESEL WORKSHOP
Loren Fennell, Research & Design, Facilitator, Co-founder
David McMahon, Cloudburst Recycling, Inc., Co-founder


Presents two separate workshops:


SAT. DIESEL VEHICLE CONVERSION TO STRAIGHT VEGETABLE OIL (SVO)
AND
SUN. PROCESSOR DESIGN WORKSHOP


WHEN: Saturday December 18th, 9am to 5pm

A one-day conversion of a diesel vehicle to run SVO.

And

WHEN: Sunday December 19th, 9am to 5pm

Processor Design, Construction, Safety and Production.
This workshop is for advanced skills. No one will be
refused for lack of ability, this is a learning process.
Persons with Welding and fabrication skills encouraged to participate.

WHERE: 2223 N. Randolph Ave., Portland 97227

DONATION: $25 - $75 each class.
(sliding scale & ability to support Alternative Fuels energy research)

Contact: Loren Fennell at: 503-493-0087 or  cholla51@yahoo.com
Use Mapquest for location: Take MAX Expo Center (Yellow Line) & detrain at Albina/Mississippi stop; bike, hike, carpool or bus!

_______________________

2 ORIENTATIONS:
Presented by:
Loren Fennell & Oregon Bio-Diesel Workshop

Tuesday, December 21st
10am-noon AND 6:30-8:30pm

2223 N. Randolph, off Interstate Ave., Portland OR

$5 - $15 donation
(based on ability to pay; no one turned away for lack of funds)

Learn about:
History & early experiments of Bio-Diesel, chemical components, being part of a co-op, processor design/safety, making fuel for personal use & MORE!
- SVO: (Straight Vegetable Oil) & its use as vehicle fuel -
- Bio-diesel: Up & coming alternative fuel source -
- Home Heating: Thousands of home owners have kept their oil furnaces & converted to WVO (Waste Vegetable Oil) as fuel -
- Glycerin: By-products used for: soap, automotive & household degreasers/cleaners -
Join us for information, questions & learning in a fun environment!
***
Call Loren at: 503-493-0087 or
E-mail:  cholla51@yahoo.com
Use Mapquest for location: Take MAX Expo Center (Yellow Line) & detrain at Albina/Mississippi stop; bike, hike, carpool or bus!
Biodiesel not a long-term solution 08.Dec.2004 17:09

a person

Although I think that biodiesel is cool and I have no problem with people using it, it isn't a long-term solution. It is useful now, since you can run your car on used cooking oil from restaurants. However, it wouldn't work on a large scale. If millions of people needed to run their biodiesel cars, then restaurants obviously wouldn't be able to supply all the fuel. So we would need to grow oil specifically for cars. However, it takes much more energy to grow the oil than you get out of it, so it's a net loss. The tractor, plow, etc. take fuel to run, it takes energy to extract the oil from the, say canola, you have to add fertilizer, it takes humanpower to get the oil, and you end up with less energy than you started with.

In my opinion, hydrogen is a better alternative, since you get the same amount of energy out of it that you put into it, instead of less. Plus it's simpler. Instead of extracting the oil from plants and transporting it to your car from the country, you just take it out of a hydrogen generator, which could be powered by, say, solar power. Some inventors in Sweden, I think, just invented a hydrogen generator the size of a coffee machine that can plug into your wall. The hydrogen comes from the air. If everyone who needed a car had a hydro one, and they had one of these generators, gas stations and centralised infrastructure would be obsolete (other than the infrastructure needed to produce the hydro generators and cars).

That being said, biodiesel is cool for now, and I intend to attend this teach-in.

PS on a previous discussion about this, someone said that algae can be used to produce biodiesel. Could that person, if they are reading this, post a link to some info or something? I am interested.

actually its ridiculous 08.Dec.2004 19:26

nobody

Biodiesel will only lead to starvation as it did in Brazil in the 1970's. When oil gets scarce farm land will be converted to fuel production and people will be left hungry. Probably third world folks will be especially hard hit, they always are. Hydrogen takes WAY TO MUCH FUEL TO BUILD SYSTEMS. There is nothing out there that we can convert to that is workable in the long run and few options available to get by for another couple of years after the oil runs out. Because, it takes way to much energy to make these alternate systems you will run out of fuel before you would even make a dent it replacing the old machines.

So, figure out how to get by with less and buy less crap. That may get us through a few extra months before the lights go out on this crazy capitalistic world of greed. Perhaps the lucky ones can build off-grid homes before its too late, Bush.

It's not hopeless 09.Dec.2004 11:23

a person again

It doesnt't take all that much fuel to build a hydrogen system. No more than to build a normal car. If we started building hydrogen generators and cars, now, we'll be fine when the oil runs out. Although I agree with "nobody" that we really need to figure out how to get by with less and buy less crap.
Some Australian inventors have claimed to have invented an electricity generator that requires no fuel of any kind and can power a house. Here is their website  http://www.lutec.com.au/
Also, it is a very good point made by the above poster that farmland being converted to oil-production would lead to mass starvation, mostly in the third world. That's why I only support it if it's being done with recycled cooking oil, which is why I think it is only practical if a few folks do it.

biodiesel comments 02.Mar.2005 22:53

amigaboy

First, let's get a few things straight:

1) biodiesel is a great solution. It's ridiculous to talk about biodiesel causing mass starvation. There are major rendering plants in every big American city, making oil-based products and waste recovery every day. If even a small percentage of that ends up as biodiesel, it won't go in the landfill. And we'll still have a LOT left to eat. That kind of apocalyptic thinking is what got us in the current political mess we're stuck in for 4 more years, and it's simply Chicken Little with its head up its Claven (cliff). Get real. If you wanna drive a big SUV for the rest of your life, have fun while the rest of us get on with our lives.

2) NREL has done a lot with biodiesel research from algae. Check it out:

 http://www.unh.edu/p2/biodiesel/article_alge.html

3) Another GREAT article was recently posted about some power plants being built/coming online in PA based on a similar oil/polymerization technology that's even more impressive than biodiesel - it basically takes ANY carbon-based stuff and converts it to fuel. The first applications will be for a city and for a Butterball plant that will generate its own heat based on the turkey 'extras'. Think of the implications for all major food-processing facilities - they could be net CONTRIBUTORS to the system instead of generating all that waste...!

 http://www.mindfully.org/Energy/2003/Anything-Into-Oil1may03.htm

4) Finally, after all the 'take' modern man does against the planet these days, don't you think it's time to GIVE something back? Recycling, using a canvas shopping bag, walking/biking/transit instead of driving is a great start but something like biodiesel can make a HUGE impact on livability for our school buses, transit buses, big trucks, etc. - all those systems rely on petro diesel now.

Let's get with the program - what are we waiting for? I just started running biodiesel into my '85 jetta and my wife's 2000 TDI beetle, and it's great!

amigaboy