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9.11 investigation

Sander Hicks and the 9/11 Truth Movement

On all sides of the political spectrum, limits exist. On the respectable (sic) Right, for example, it's fine to rant and rave about the sanctity of "unborn lives" but not acceptable to post pictures of abortion doctors on your website. The Left, contrary to popular belief, has limits of respectability (sic), too. For example, leftists can get hot and bothered over Bush not reacting to pre-9/11 warnings. However, those who go further and implicate the U.S. government in any way, shape, or form...well, they are banished to realm of "conspiracy theory."

"The seeming paranoia of conspiracy theorists is not necessarily the result of some underlying mental dysfunction or of stupidity," declares Jonathan Vankin, author of "Conspiracies, Cover-Ups, and Crimes." "The dysfunction is with American society, maybe even civilization as a whole. The structure of civilization itself requires mass adherence to faith in the institutions that built civilization and make it run. Conspiracies theorists question those authorities and, because they do, they skirt the fringes of society."

Actively skirting the fringes of society is Sander Hicks, founder of Soft Skull Press and now Vox Pop/Drench Kiss. Hicks gained national notoriety when he published Jim Hatfield's controversial Dubya biography, "Fortunate Son." The scathing, well-documented expose of the Bush dynasty resulted in near financial ruin for Soft Skull, a brilliant film documentary, and Hatfield's tragic suicide. Through it all, Hicks remained focused and ever-searching.

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