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Boycott Rackspace for Indymedia Cave

This matter is far from settled. Rackspace appears to have acted precipitiously in response to a US court order to act on servers located in the UK, ostensibly under a treaty for mutual aid in law enforcement. Initiation was by Switzerland to attempt to protect two of its undercover police monitoring a demo in Italy. The two were photographed and their photos posted on an Indymedia site in France. Switzerland asked for Italian assistance, and the two in turn asked for US and UK assistance. This multi-nation cooperation is covered by the mutual assistance treaty.
Boycott Rackspace for Indymedia Cave

9 October 2004

Related: http://cryptome.org/fbi-imc/fbi-imc-doc.htm

Statewatch on UK complicity: http://www.statewatch.org/news/2004/oct/04uk-usa-indymedia.htm

Indymedia: http://www.indymedia.org/en/index.shtml


To: nettime-l@bbs.thing.net
From: John Young Date: 9 October 2004, 04:24 PM EST
Subject: Re: indymedia servers in UK seized by FBI

This matter is far from settled. Rackspace appears to have acted precipitiously in response to a US court order to act on servers located in the UK, ostensibly under a treaty for mutual aid in law enforcement. Initiation was by Switzerland to attempt to protect two of its undercover police monitoring a demo in Italy. The two were photographed and their photos posted on an Indymedia site in France. Switzerland asked for Italian assistance, and the two in turn asked for US and UK assistance. This multi-nation cooperation is covered by the mutual assistance treaty.

The FBI has stated that it has no investigation of the matter, that it only served to convey the Swiss/Italian mutual assistance request to the US company and its UK subsidiary. The US company apparently did not contest the court order, and claims in a statement that it acted as "a good corporate citizen."

This is not unprecedented. Some years ago several US ISPs removed material on sites at the request of foreign governments. They acted unilaterally, without court order, merely upon the request of the governments. Some of these incidents were made public, competing ISPs offered to refuse to abide such requests, and customers abandoned those who cooperated with the authorities.

This method can be used against Rackspace. Indeed, it is likely that Rackspace awaits public outcry, and customers leaving, in order to have grounds to resist the thinly justified action in this case.

Recall that the US DoJ is regularly bluffing and faking its attack on alleged terrorist suspects and political dissidents. Other countries are following the US in this vile practice. They cover for each other with these obnoxious mutual assistance treaties, in which fingers are pointed after the dirty deeds are done.

In this case, US law has been trashed by the treaties, and the FBI laughably says it had no say. That the US must break its law in order to get other countries to break theirs in exchange. Shell gamism, and worse likely to come unless there is loud, strong and lasting protest.

There should be a campaign to boycott Rackspace, then on to other targets yet to be identified. US ISPs should join the protest on their own behalf and that of their customers. First off, there must be a challenge to keep confidential orders from governments to hand over customer information.


homepage: homepage: http://www.lastcallpdx.com

We need to move towards self hosting. 10.Oct.2004 19:24

@

It is not difficult to host your own website. You need a server and an Internet connection. Even DSL may be sufficient. We need to start moving towards each IndyMedia being hosted on its own server owned and operated by the collective. Procedures should be in place to destroy disks before they are extracted. All non-identifying information could be backed up, but there should be some mechanism in place to destroy the information on the hard disk whenever one is demanded by law enforcement.

Obviously, this is not a simple proposition. Law enforcement could storm the location of the server and walk out with it. Therefore, perhaps a fully encrypted disk would help (not perfect but better than nothing). The procedure should be to destroy it if possible before handing it over but to make sure that whatever is on it is very difficult to decrypt in those cases where destruction is not possible.

Having drect ownership of your systems 10.Oct.2004 20:30

Rent to Own tali@lastcallpdx.com

Direct ownership of your systems is definently a good thing, altho doing such tends to raise the expense of running the servers a nice penny. You would either have to do some sort of colocation or own your own center(which building would be extremely costly and time consuming for all involved), when it comes down to it while I'm sure there are plenty of coders and design guys to build/maintain the site and/or server, somewhat starting over and running out of house would Im almost sure be out of the question. The expense comes basically down to bandwidth, and the best possible way I can percieve would be for them to somehow acquire or build the servers and find a like minded individual that wouldn't mind coughing up rackspace and bandwidth for a worthy cause. This course of action would atleast make it illegal for the feds to touch your server without serving you directly(thus keeping your data in place temporarily). The other side is that you are relying on the "guru of unexpected free rackspace/bandwidth" to keep your server(s) connected to the world, and if served Im sure would just as quickly be disconnected.


two words 10.Oct.2004 22:44

clamydia

Distributed servers. 30 people with broadband=7680kbps (well, that's going by an average of 256kpbs per user, which we all know isn't REALLY a realistic number... I still don't understand how the ISPs can get away with advertizing speeds that are much higher than what you actually end up getting.) That's about 7.5mbps. I'm guestimating that real-world speeds will be in the T1 range (2-10 mbps) with that amount of helpers.

Set up a community colocation project in your town 12.Oct.2004 18:48

cccp