portland independent media center  
images audio video
newswire article reposts global

environment

global warming

florida has been hit by a major hurricane (any one concerned about cuba?), and, as usual the corporate media is all over the devastation and death but none of them want to talk about global warming. i wish i could kiss the person who invented the bicycle.
Gov. Bush explained Hurricane Charley by saying, "You can't plan for the unforeseen. God doesn't follow the linear directions of computer models."
 http://www.tallahassee.com/mld/democrat/news/opinion/9425789.htm

Freak flooding causes chaos in Cornwall
A freak flash flood has devastated a small town in the north of Cornwall after the equivalent of two months' rainfall came down in just two hours.
 http://www.edie.net/gf.cfm?L=left_frame.html&R=http://www.edie.net/news/Archive/8755.cfm


From Democracy Now!
 http://www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=04/08/16/1411227
DAVID HELVARG: Yeah. It is ironic that last summer when you have historic heat wave and flooding in Europe, most Europeans recognize it as climate change. When we have historic drought and forest fires in the west, they blame environmentalists

 http://www.thehour.com/281245472677147.bsp
------ Report warns of flooding, heat waves, melting glaciers across Europe as consequence of global warming COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) -- Rising sea levels, disappearing glaciers in the Alps and more deadly heat waves are coming for Europeans because of global warming, Europe's environmental agency warned Wednesday.
The European Environment Agency said much more needs to be done -- and fast. Climate change "will considerably affect our societies and environments for decades and centuries to come," its 107-page report said.


Friday August 13, 2004
The Guardian
 http://www.guardian.co.uk/weather/Story/0,2763,1282372,00.html

Heatwaves here to stay
Tim Radford, science editor
Heatwaves of the kind that killed 30,000 people in Europe last year will become more frequent, more intense and longer-lasting, according to reports by US scientists today.
Gerald Meehl and Claudia Tebaldi of the US national centre for atmosphere research (NCAR) report in the journal Science that the predicted increase in heat-absorbing greenhouse gases over the next hundred years is likely to intensify the pattern of heatwaves established in Europe and North America.

Computer models show that heatwaves will become more severe in the south and west of the US and the Mediterranean.

"It's the extreme weather and climate events that will have some of the most severe impacts on society as climate changes," said Dr Meehl.

The study backs up a prediction made by Swiss scientists, earlier this year that 2003 was a "summer of the future" for Europe.

Without some relief from the sweltering conditions, the elderly and the ill become increasingly at risk of heatstroke, heat exhaustion and dehydration. The team focused on Paris and Chicago be cause both had experienced lethal heatwaves in recent years.

The researchers predict that without worldwide cuts in greenhouse gas emissions, the average number of heatwaves in Chicago would increase by 25% to about two a year. The increase in Paris will be even greater, to an average of 2.15 a year.

The hot spells will also last longer. Heat waves in Chicago now tend to last for between five and eight days. Computer models predict that they could extend to eight or nine days.