portland independent media center  
images audio video
promoted newswire article announcements oregon & cascadia

forest defense oregon elections 2004

Don't believe the hype -- Wyden's Wilderness Bill will INCREASE logging on Mt. Hood!

Forest Conservation group Bark opposes Senator Wyden's inclusion of a mandated increase in logging in his Mt. Hood Wilderness Proposal, introduced in the US Senate today. The bill mandates a quota for logging on the westside of Mt. Hood National Forest while opening up the east side of Mt. Hood for logging in the name of forest health and fire prevention. Mirroring the Bush Administration's so-called Healthy Forest Restoration Act, the bill allows logging in Mt. Hood's eastside back country, which has been proven to increase the risk of catastrophic fire.
The bill will increase logging projects like the Mill Creek timber sale
The bill will increase logging projects like the Mill Creek timber sale
No Whisky, another sale that we'd see more of the likes of under Wyden's Bill
No Whisky, another sale that we'd see more of the likes of under Wyden's Bill
see Today's Oregonian article for background
 link to www.oregonlive.com


Wyden's Wilderness Bill Ill Conceived: Includes Loopholes for Destructive Mt. Hood Logging
Bark Opposes Logging Provision in Wilderness Bill

Contacts:
Sandi Scheinberg, Bark, Executive Director: 503-331-0374
 Sandi@bark-out.org


PORTLAND, OR, July 22, 2004 —Forest Conservation group Bark opposes Senator Wyden's inclusion of a mandated increase in logging in his Mt. Hood Wilderness Proposal, introduced in the US Senate today. The bill mandates a quota for logging on the westside of Mt. Hood National Forest while opening up the east side of Mt. Hood for logging in the name of forest health and fire prevention. Mirroring the Bush Administration's so-called Healthy Forest Restoration Act, the bill allows logging in Mt. Hood's eastside back country, which has been proven to increase the risk of catastrophic fire.

"If Wyden wants more wilderness, he should pass a wilderness bill, not a logging bill. We support additional protection for Mt. hood, but this legislation is ill-conceived. It includes loopholes for destructive logging that simply do not belong in a wilderness bill," said Sandi Scheinberg, Bark's executive director.

In particular, Bark is concerned about Section 804 that increases logging on the eastside of Mt. Hood. This provision repeats the language of the Bush Administration's pro-logging Healthy Forest Restoration Act to create open season on the heavily utilized East side of Mt. Hood National Forest near Government Camp, Cooper Spur, Hood River, and the Columbia River Gorge. While the bill directs logging to stands that have been previously logged before, the term "previously managed" is wide open to interpretation, and the bill could result in the logging of hundred-year-old native forests that have one or two stumps in them.

"This bill gives too much discretion to the Forest Service, which has a track record of logging forests into ecological collapse. We urge Wyden's office to work with other members of Congress to explore legitimate opportunities for forest restoration in a separate bill," said Scheinberg. This discretion could harm rare and endangered species such as the northern spotted owl, which are increasingly relying upon mature second growth stands for survival.

Senator Wyden's bill provides an increase of $3 million in timber industry subsidies for logging Mt. Hood National Forest, which was determined to be the fourth biggest money losing forest in the nation when figures were last available (according to 2001 report by Taxpayers for Common Sense, www.taxpayer.net.)

"If Senator Wyden really wants to preserve Mt. Hood's wildlands, then he'll create a stand-alone wilderness bill. If he wants true restoration, then he'll call for an end to destructive commercial logging on the remaining areas of Mt. Hood National Forest in a separate bill," said Bark Forest Defense Intern, Sarah Wald.



###

About Bark:

Bark is a non-profit grassroots conservation group working to preserve the forests, waters and wildlife of Mt. Hood National Forest. Currently there are 50 timber sales in the vicinity of Mt. Hood National Forest, most of which include old growth logging and clearcutting. Bark monitors and tracks all timber sales and commercial projects to ensure the Forest Service and BLM abide by environmental laws, and manage the forest in the interest of the public. In addition to challenging destructive commercial activities, Bark educates the public and engages them in public oversight of local forests through its monthly hikes, Adopt-A-Timber Sale program, and an award-winning cable access TV show, "Bark for Mt. Hood."


Sandi Scheinberg
Executive Director, Bark
PO Box 12065
Portland, OR 97212
503-331-0374
www.bark-out.org

homepage: homepage: http://www.bark-out.org
phone: phone: 503-331-0374


ONRC and Sierra Club Endorse Wyden's logging bill 22.Jul.2004 16:26

anon

ONRC and Sierra Club ENDORSED it!

Don't let Ron Wyden-ONRC-Sierra Club get away with this scam!
Hope about letting these folks know what you think about it:

Regna Merritt \  rm@onrc.org
Paul Shively \  paul.shively@sierraclub.org
Jay Ward \  jw@onrc.org

ONRC's PRESS RELEASE BELOW:

July 22, 2004
CONTACT: Steve Pedery, (503) 283-6343 ext. 212

ONRC Praises Legislation Protecting Mt. Hood and the Columbia Gorge

Senator Wyden's bill provides a foundation for protecting Mt. Hood and the Columbia Gorge; attention now turns to the rest of Oregon's
Congressional Delegation

Portland-The Oregon Natural Resources Council today commended new
legislation authored by Oregon Senator Ron Wyden that would protect 177,000 acres of wild lands around Mount Hood and in the Columbia Gorge. The Lewis and Clark Mount Hood Wilderness Act of 2004 would preserve these areas as a legacy for generations, safeguarding important public lands in two of the most beloved places in Oregon.

"We want to thank Senator Wyden for his vision and leadership. His legislation provides us with a foundation for protecting Mount Hood and the Columbia Gorge," said Jay Ward, Conservation Director of the Oregon Natural Resources Council. "Now we need the help of the rest of
Oregon's Congressional delegation to make this vision a reality."

Mount Hood and the Columbia Gorge receive millions of visitors each year, but some of their most popular areas have little real protection from logging and other forms of development. Senator Wyden's
legislation would grant formal wilderness protections to such places as:

* Lost Lake and the surrounding old-growth forests.
* The historic back country trails of the Tilly Jane area.
* The scenic forests and meadows around Twin Lakes, Boulder Lake,
and Mirror Lake.
* The headwaters of the Hood River.
* The Roaring River, a rugged and beautiful tributary of the
Clackamas.

"A century from now, no one will look back and say that we didn't build
enough parking lots on Mount Hood, or allow enough clear cuts along the Columbia Gorge," added Ward. "But they will look back and thank Senator Wyden for making sure that future generations have the opportunity to enjoy these special places."

While ONRC expressed some concern over certain provisions of the bill, including mountain bikes and logging in other areas around Mount Hood, the organization looks forward to working with the Senator to iron out these details.

Ward noted that over the last year Senator Wyden, along with Congressmen Greg Walden and Earl Blumenauer, have held numerous public forums on the future of Mount Hood and the Columbia Gorge. At these forums Oregonians have spoken out overwhelmingly in favor of more protection for these special places.

"Senator Wyden has delivered on his promise to help preserve the wild lands of Mount Hood and the Columbia Gorge," concluded Ward. "Now it is up to Congressmen Walden and Blumenauer to uphold their side of the bargain."

No Whisky 22.Jul.2004 17:26

(Who doesn't need a nip now and then?)

That picture isn't really of No Whisky, here are three picts from three of the units currently in planning.
Unit 87 borders the Roaring River area mentioned above
Unit 87 borders the Roaring River area mentioned above
Typical No Whisky unit
Typical No Whisky unit
Another typical No Whisky unit
Another typical No Whisky unit

Ron Wyden is a timber whore! 23.Jul.2004 09:31

StevetheGreen

Where the hell were all these mainstream environmental groups when Ron Wyden held (what essentially amounted to a campaign stop) when he had the public forum to gain comments on expanding the Mt. Hood wilderness area?

One right after another I watched representatives from all of the mainstream (and not so mainstream) environmental and forest defense groups get up there and kiss Ron Wyden's ass in hopes that he would throw them a crumb (after he took the whole cookie) when he was essentially the architect of the "Bush Healthy forest iniative".

I was the only person who stood up and disrupted this lovefest by pointing out that Wyden betrayed us and is not a friend of the forests. Only GWB took more money from big Timber than Wyden did.
The people in the room booed me for telling the truth at their lovefest with a timber whore.

Groups like "the sierra club's" allegiance to the Democratic party will not call a spade a spade when it comes to any Democrats, regardless of how abismal their record is.
(This should be obvious to everyone!)
They seem to be content with the type of compromises that have led to almost all of the remaining pockets of "connectivity" being eradicated under the guise of their favorite terms "political realities and compromise".

I for one will not kiss any of these bastards ass under the guise of "getting what we can get" because that strategy has been shown to be a failure over the long term.

We must (especially in an election year) stand up and confront these people in the only way they understand.

Ron Wyden accountability week starts next week, stay tuned to find out what you can do.

Conservation for ecosystem recovery, not political and economic gain 23.Jul.2004 12:43

spiral prowl@cascadiarising.org

The narrow focus by many conservation groups on the protection of old-growth and roadless/wilderness has increased public awareness of those issues and created a certain amount of political pressure. Wyden is a quintessential politician who wants to ride the fence whenever he possibly can. While it's not readily apparent from Jay Ward's groveling tribute to Wyden for introducing this weak "wilderness" bill, it's easy as pie for Wyden to introduce wilderness designations in this manner. The bigger name enviros will dance for joy to get concrete protections for wilderness areas--which are of of course very important ecologically and will make them look great to their funders. The timber industry will be pleased (although they may make a show of dissing the new wilderness protections) because it will be that much easier to engage in heavily subsidized public lands logging--and in areas that aren't as well known, farther away from major population centers, and in some cases, not as charismatic to people.

There are many downsides to focusing so much attention only on the protection of roadless and old growth areas, and I'm not going to get into all of them here. I also want to emphasize that those areas are extremely ecologically important. Protecting those areas would be a major step forward in maintaining the dwindling biodiversity of our forests. However, if the protections come at the expense of huge tracts of other forested area, we will be doing very little to restore basic ecological integrity across the bioregion. While it can be difficult to believe sometimes, I get the impression that deep down, many of the mainstream conservationists want the same outcome for the forests as the so called "radicals". However, they feel it's important to follow a strategy of going after only part of what you want, even if you have to make some big compromises to get it. The strategy is that once you have that part, you can then focus on the other pieces of the pie and getting them will be that much easier. Again, funders like funding shorter, specific, and politically popular goals. Unfortunately, it's a strategy that hasn't been proven to be very effective most of the time. Once you've cut a deal with the likes of Wyden, he's going to ride that one as far as he can possibly take it and the media will be lapping it up. The well known compromise by big enviro groups on the Northwest Forest Plan is a prime example. After that the media continually trumpeted that the spotted owls and old growth forests were finally protected. Likewise, the media headlines if this bill is passed will read "Wyden Bill Creates Mt. Hood Wilderness".

There are many ecologically important forests that are not "pristine". Most of the timber sales that conservation groups work to stop east of the Cascade Crest have sale units that have experienced some degree of logging in the past. Sometimes it is just a few trees that have been logged. Other times, areas have been high graded (removed of the very largest trees) throughout, but there's still a diverse forest there with a lot of old and mature trees. While these areas have often suffered from negative impacts of previous logging (soil compaction, not enough snags and large downed logs), if it's still functioning as a forested ecosystem and providing habitat for species that need it, we tend to feel it should be protected. Many of these areas need to be left alone so that recovery processes can continue. For animals that need huge territories to thrive, it's not enough to protect the few areas that haven't been logged. We need to protect those areas, but also to let recovering areas continue their work, and do active restoration in the areas where humans have succeeded in disrupting the balance.

Can we talk? 23.Jul.2004 13:13

Truth

spiral said.....

" Wyden is a quintessential politician who wants to ride the fence whenever he possibly can. While it's not readily apparent from Jay Ward's groveling tribute to Wyden for introducing this weak "wilderness" bill, it's easy as pie for Wyden to introduce wilderness designations in this manner. The bigger name enviros will dance for joy to get concrete protections for wilderness areas--which are of of course very important ecologically and will make them look great to their funders."

The truth will set you free!

Wyden is a Pharmaceutical Company Whore as well. Let's dump the creep. 24.Jul.2004 14:38

Justella

Wyden sold us out last November when he jumped on the Pharmaceutical Company Bandwagon and okayed the republican's "Prescription Drug Profits for Large Corporations Bill." He is doing nothing for affordable healthcare or for the people who sent him to washington.