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9.11 investigation

A 9 minute gap in world history

Where was our leader in that 9 minutes of frozen time. What was he thinking?
In Fahrenheit 9/11, the television footage of Bush on the morning of 9/11 is shown in full. Bush is sitting in front of a classroom of 1st graders in Florida, when Andrew Card comes to tell him about the second plane hitting the second tower.

This scene of the movie is an important part of world history that seems to never have been mentioned or shown before, for obvious reasons. Two reasons why it's so important: because that 9 minute gap had mostly been a secret until Fahrenheit came out, and because it clearly shows one man's approach to the leadership role. That approach involves glaring angrily and suspiciously at a classroom of 1st graders.

Watching the scene itself changed history, for me at least. Based on dozens of news accounts I had seen or read since 9/11, I had always assumed the scene in that Florida classroom went like this: Andrew Card tells Bush about the first plane hitting the first tower. Bush stays in the classroom. Then about 1/2 hour later Card tells Bush about the second plane hitting, at which point Bush addresses the classroom, saying there's been a national emergency, and heads away from the east coast as fast as possible.

This year I first heard criticism about Bush staying in the classroom while a national emergency was unfolding, and then the Bush defense that he was trying to project a strong image of resolve in the face of terror, to the assembled children. I heard this, assuming the criticism and defense was referring to the time in between the first and second planes hitting the towers--about a 1/2 hour gap, 17 minutes plus about 10 until Card came in and told Bush.

But after watching the movie, I see that the criticism was more directed at the 9 minutes when time stood still--when George Bush grabbed a children's book off a shelf and just tried to forget everything.

It's right to criticize Bush for sitting there after he was informed about the first plane hitting the first tower. As a president, he should have stood up and excused himself, saying there's been a national emergency, and consult with advisers, check CNN, etc...

It's not right to criticize him for that 9 minute escape from the world stage. The video footage of that 9 minutes was never meant to be viewed by the public, but rather was meant to be analyzed by a criminal psychologist. Maybe it's a stretch, but that 9 minutes may be used against him in future trials or tribunals.

Gross criminal negligence is the best phrase to describe it. That's what makes Fahrenheit 9/11 such a good movie. Just like tv shows that show criminals "caught in the act" the movie shows the genesis of so many of our country's current problems. It's not so much one man, but the abscence of one man, that has been so devastating to us.

The 9 minute gap was buried in world events. On the morning of 9/11, one of the major stories besides the attacks themselves was the sudden disappearance of executive leadership. One was taken underground, and remained there for quite awhile. Bush headed for the Midwest, with a short stopover in Louisiana. Many argue that this was a cowardly retreat, if not criminal negligence.

I was watching CBS and Peter Jennings that day, and at some point in the afternoon, he wondered aloud, "Where is the president in this time of crisis? Shouldn't we be able to see him? Shouldn't he be playing a leadership role at this point?" (paraphrasing) These questions were never answered correctly, but simply forgotten in the overall crisis.

One defense that might have been used is that these were simply Cold War procedures for protecting the executive branch in the case of Soviet missile attack. Strangely though, everybody knew these were kamikaze-style attacks, and with all planes grounded, the chances of another attack with a plane were pretty slim. NYC would have been the safest place in the world for Bush to go, aside from the noxious fumes coming from Ground Zero.

Still, the notion that these were Cold War procedures is somewhat believable. When the fighter jets were "scrambled" on the east coast, they too were looking for a Soviet missile attack, since that was all they had ever trained for.

Smuggling Bush to the Midwest and Cheney underground was definitely a spectacle, and might have been played up for added effect. This is a conclusion that never got much attention, but making the case for invading Iraq might have started in that Florida classroom, PR stunts and all.

The 9 minute gap was not Cold War procedure, however. It was the moment when the cogs and gears inside Bush's head came to a slow halt. Better yet, it was the moment when the hamster in the spinning wheel inside Bush's head stopped running, went to a corner of the cage, and died.

In conclusion, here's a suggestion of what Bush was thinking, as he picked up that children's book, that useless prop, and glared angrily and suspiciously at a group of 1st graders:

"Maybe if I just pretend to disappear, maybe I WILL disappear, then people won't keep tellin' me stupid shit....what the fuck am I supposed to do? Stupid fucking kids. I wish I was a long, long way from here."

Any other suggestions?
"Based on dozens of news accounts I had seen or read since 9/11 . . ." 17.Jul.2004 14:31

suggestion:

you need to learn a lot more about what REALLY happened that day,

than just from what corporate media told you or even the "Fahrenheit 9/11" movie.

the Bush classroom video footage has been available for years on the Internet.


"I bet the spin doctors are screaming at the screen" 17.Jul.2004 15:03

more to the story

Yes, there is a lot more to this story. Moore could only scrath the surface in his movie because his focus was elsewhere. I'm not a fan of David Icke but I find this rant to be appropriate:

But Bush told the Florida town meeting a very different story. This is what he said about what happened that morning in answer to a question by someone named Jordan:

"Well, Jordan, you're not going to believe what state I was in when I heard about the terrorist attack. I was in Florida. And my Chief of Staff, Andy Card -- actually, I was in a classroom talking about a reading program that works. I was sitting outside the classroom waiting to go in, and I saw an airplane hit the tower -- the TV was obviously on. And I used to fly, myself, and I said, well, there's one terrible pilot. I said, it must have been a horrible accident. But I was whisked off there, I didn't have much time to think about it. And I was sitting in the classroom, and Andy Card, my Chief of Staff, who is sitting over here, walked in and said, "A second plane has hit the tower, America is under attack."

THIS IS STAGGERING - THERE WAS NO LIVE TELEVISION COVERAGE OF THE FIRST PLANE HITTING THE TOWER - HOW COULD THERE BE?? THE FOOTAGE OF THE FIRST CRASH WAS TAKEN BY ONLOOKERS AND SURVEILLANCE CAMERAS AND DID NOT AIR FOR HOURS AND DAYS AFTER IT HAPPENED. THERE WAS LIVE COVERAGE OF THE SECOND CRASH, OF COURSE, BUT NOT OF THE FIRST - SO HOW ON EARTH CAN THE PRESIDENT OF THE UNITED STATES CLAIM TO A PUBLIC MEETING TO HAVE SEEN IT LIVE ON A TELEVISION OUTSIDE THE CLASSROOM WHERE HE WAS WAITING TO ADDRESS THOSE CHILDREN?? AND WHY HAS NO NEWS ORGANISATION OR "JOURNALIST" PICKED UP THIS FANTASTIC LIE?

And what about that statement about "there's one terrible pilot". What?? A passenger jet crashes into one of the twin towers full of people and all the President of the United States can say is "there's one terrible pilot"!! And then he walks into a classroom to read a story about a pet goat?? God help us. "There's one terrible pilot"? We are not talking a light plane flown by an amateur, but a commerical airliner and even if it had not been a terrorist outrage, it would still have been an enormous tragedy requiring the leadership of the US president. But of course none of this tissue of lies by Bush could have happened because he could not possibly have seen the first crash on live television because there was no live coverage. The fact that Bush KNEW the plane was going to hit the tower is more like it because he, like his masters who orchestrated it, was well aware of what was going to unfold that morning.

AND EVEN AFTER HE CLAIMS THAT HIS CHIEF OF STAFF TOLD HIM OF THE SECOND PLANE, AND THAT "AMERICA IS UNDER ATTACK", BUSH WENT ON READING THE STORY ABOUT THE PET GOAT!! YOU SIMPLY COULDN'T MAKE THIS UP, COULD YOU?


perhaps he saw.... 17.Jul.2004 16:11

ding dong

I reckon Card said to Bush, "Keep your damn mouth shut, your family has screwed things up enough. uncle Dick is sorting things out"
Bush is always saying things wrong, Fahrenheit 911 demonstrates this clearly, so perhaps Bush meant to say " .... and I saw an airplane HAD hit the tower".
There was live coverage of the building in flames, that is why people saw the second plane hitting the tower on liveTV. Perhaps that is what he saw, the building in flames, not it the first plane actually hitting.

Well... 17.Jul.2004 19:37

Tony Blair's dog

"But of course none of this tissue of lies by Bush could have happened because he could not possibly have seen the first crash on live television because there was no live coverage."

unless he was shown a "close circuit" broadcast.

Or a "special" broadcast of "unfolding events".

bush is either an idiot 19.Jul.2004 17:10

or is cleverly playing one on TV

Bush, like Reagan, is the perfect figurehead because he can plausibly plead confusion and ignorance whenever he says anything that would incriminate a responsible, intelligent person and end his career.

He could easily weasel out of all these criticisms by "explaining" that he just can't really remember when he saw what, where the TV was, what day anything happened on, any of it. His job is just to go where they tell him, say his lines, and sign shit. That's what Reagan did, that's what Bush does, and neither of them ever said anything extemporaneously that made any damn sense at all.

I guess we're pretty fortunate 21.Jul.2004 07:03

Dance

From films I've seen of Hitler, he seems to have been pretty darn serious. (And Stalin probably more so.)

People can make fun of them now - and I guess Hitler was mocked by some even in his time. But I never heard of anyone laughing at the sight of Hitler himself.

But in or out of context, Dubya is just plain goofy. When attending theater, you need to suspend your disbelief. With Dubya, if you can suspend your belief (that there's a whole world at the mercy of a rogue superpower that has this man - I don't normally even regard him as "a man" - at the helm of the ship of state), the whole thing is one continual rip-roaring farce.

Too bad for me, I can't usually suspend my belief in the whole world as his victim, so i usually just block out hearing anything he says. (Except when I'm watching something like Fahrenheit 9/11, I only listen to his words that I think are sincere[!]. Or, as some people put it, "You can tell when he's lying; just watch his lips ....")