portland independent media center  
images audio video
promoted newswire article reporting portland metro

forest defense | save the biscuit

Logging begins at Upper Timber Sale, Mt. Hood National Forest

The Upper Timber Sale, located in the North Fork of the Clackamas River Watershed, is currently being logged. The roads have already been punched in. Trees located in landing areas and in the new roads have already been cut. The heart of the units could go any day now!

Forest Defense Weekend Campout July 10 & 11

Road building equipment on site!
Road building equipment on site!
Equipment punching new roads into Upper Timber Sale
Equipment punching new roads into Upper Timber Sale
This snag has already been cut in a soon-to-be landing
This snag has already been cut in a soon-to-be landing
Lots of new ugly ugly roads
Lots of new ugly ugly roads
Picnic by the river.  How much longer will this forest be standing?
Picnic by the river. How much longer will this forest be standing?
Logging for road building in action...
Logging for road building in action...
Baby loves this special place? Will it still be around for his first birthday?
Baby loves this special place? Will it still be around for his first birthday?
We counted 175 rings on this snag-stump
We counted 175 rings on this snag-stump
too soon gone??
too soon gone??
Nothing says USFS like road-building equipment...
Nothing says USFS like road-building equipment...
The Upper Timber Sale was auctioned on March 7, 2003 to Rosboro Lumber for $600,758.50. This sale has major riparian (water quality) issues - with only 30 ft buffers recommended on the abundant streams in the units. One of the recently built temporary roads crosses a streambed. This sale contains beautiful native forest surrounded on several sides by the old Boyer Creek thin - a hideous example of what the whole area will look like if the Upper sale proceeds as planned.

I have spent much time at this sale before logging began. It was heart-breaking to see the roads punched into Unit 5, one of my favorite units. At the base of Unit 5 is a stream, the kind that reminds you of how all those "fairy land" references got attached to the Northwest. The carpet of moss was thick and soft enough to let a baby roll around on (literally)! Further up the river, much of the stream's protection was lost over a decade ago, when the hillsides surrounding it were cut. The part of the stream running through unit 5 is a beautiful oasis in an overcut area. This weekend, we had a picnic lunch there, knowing the next time we visited this special place, it would likely be gone.

According to the Forest Service, the Matrix land in this area is "overstocked" and "lacks diversity." Yet most of the areas we walked through looked healthy with a wide diversity of species, ground cover, and several layers of canopy. We could see light clearly reaching the forest floor. Lichens and mushrooms were everywhere. In the Riparian areas, the Forest Service believes it is necessary to thin within 30 feet of streams to "improve riparian conditions by accelerating development of mature forest characteristics, including larger trees that would provide future large woody debris recruitment and snag habitat." Never mind the large number of snags they will cut down in creating this sale (labeling them with bright orange 'killer tree' tape).


Logging healthy forest will not accelerate the development of the area into old growth. Tractor logging right over the healthy understory destroys the soil and increases erosion. Forests are more than tree farms with big trees. The Forest Service seems unable or unwilling to comprehend this.

A lot of the equipment for road building was on site, but no logging equipment as of Sunday, July 4th. There was a fire truck in the sale area. Is this regulation for logging? Is this because they know commercial logging will increase the risk of fire?

At this point, direct action seems the only way to stall or stop the Upper timber sale.

What you can do: Contact stores that sell Rosboro lumber products! Contact Rosboro Lumber (http://www.rosboro.com/ )! You can call (541) 746-8411 or email info@rosboro.com. Tell Rosboro to stop logging native forest on our public lands. Contact Mt. Hood National Forest Supervisor Gary Larsen, (503) 668-1700 and Regional Forester Linda Goodman, 503-808-2200! Tell them how you feel about the logging of the Upper Timber Sale! Contact Senator Wyden at 202-224-5244. Ask him what he is going to do to stop the logging of the Upper Timber Sale. We have 48 timber sales on Mt. Hood National Forest. Our Senators and Representatives need to hear about each and every timber sale from us. Wyden's proposed new wilderness does not make up for the logging of our last native forest on Mt. Hood National Forest or in the Biscuit logging project.

Driving Directions: Up 4610, about halfway between Salmon-Huckleberry Wilderness and the western forest boundary. Take 224 past Estacada and turn at the Silver Fox RV sign, 4610 (some of you may remember this as the back way to the eagle sales). Take a left towards the "No Shooting Area" sign. Stay on 4610 and the units will eventually be off of a road to your left. Be aware, at one point the road turns into something else and you have to take a really sharp right to stay on 4610. Take a map! There is "Logging Area. Keep Out" scrawled on the gate blocking the road the units are down. On weekdays, when log trucks might be barreling down the one lane 4610, you may want to go in from the side where the Eagle sales were. 4613 will take you up to 4610. To get to 4613, take a turn off onto Fall Creek Road, and then Squaw Mountain Road. Again, use maps!

Unit map can be found on http://www.bark-out.org/tsdb/detail.php?sale=upper


Ugly is as Ugly Does 09.Jul.2004 14:48

Chuck charlief[at]bark-out.org

The logging in Upper will be within the "Riparian Reserves" which were setup to protect fresh water sources by the Northwest Forest Plan. The logging will be within 30 feet of the creek that runs along the base of the unit. At the top of the slope of this timber sale unit is the exposed soil from the road building. The fundament purpose of the Riparian Reserve is to provide an undisturbed environment next to waterways so that any disturbances get buffered; in this place the idea would be that sedimentation of the creek due to the road building would be avoided by having the sediment laden water drop the sediment as it flowed through the undisturbed Riparian Reserve. With logging going to occur within 30 feet of the creek, not only will the Riparian Unit not be able to fulfill its role as sediment break for the creek, but the Riparian Reserve itself will be fouling the creek.

You may ask how the Forest Service is able to do something that is clearly not in the best interest of a healthy forest ecosystem? It is because they have not been confronted by enough concerned citizens. A simple letter or email is a very good start.

Linda Goodman
Regional Forester, Pacific Northwest Region 6
P.O. Box 3623, Portland, OR 97208
 ldgoodman@fs.fed.us
Road building exposes soils above creek
Road building exposes soils above creek
Logging in
Logging in "Riparian Reserve" - within 30' of creek
Habitat loss is the Forest Service's dirty little secret
Habitat loss is the Forest Service's dirty little secret