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US 'Contractors' Interrogating Iraqi Prisoners

 http://www.worldtribune.com/worldtribune/breaking_10.html
U.S. contractors interrogated Iraqi prisoners

SPECIAL TO WORLD TRIBUNE.COM
Monday, May 3, 2004

U.S. security contractors have been employed to interrogate Iraqi prisoners, according to an attorney for a U.S. soldier under investigation.

The private contractors were used to interrogate Iraqi detainees in the Abu Ghaib prison north of Baghdad. The attorney for a U.S. soldier accused of abusing Iraqi prisoners said CACI International, based in Arlington, Va., and Titan Corp. of San Diege, provided interrogators and translators for interrogations at Abu Ghaib.

The assertion placed private U.S. firms deep inside U.S.-led coalition operations in Iraq.

Until now, U.S. officials maintained that private military and security firms merely protected the Coalition Provisional Authority and private companies in Iraq, Middle East Newsline reported.

Gary Myers, the attorney for Staff Sgt. Ivan Frederick, said he could not determine the extent of the use of private contractors in the U.S.-operated Iraqi prison. But he said this information would be disclosed during any trial of his client or others accused of abusing Iraqi prisoners.

Titan has employed translators for U.S. forces in Iraq, company executives said. But they could not confirm that they were used in Abu Ghaib.

Copyright 2004 East West Services, Inc.
this is why the american military is so 'small' 02.May.2004 21:36

comments

1. due to the fact that 'contractors', better known as mercenaries, make up the 2nd largest membership of the 'coalition' occupying iraq, the us military can be smaller. in this case, don rumsfeld failed to realize that the iraqi people would make up their own minds about having america take over their country. they are free, alright: free to seriously f up some americans that are on their land now rather than dropping bombs from 50,000 feet or sanctions from washington, dc.

2. these 'contractors' are the same people who provide 'security' for corporations in the us when there aren't any global oil wars going on. like the security guards at pioneer place mall and in businesses around portland who assault female demonstrators. (seen it). or the private cops of umpqua bank and others who track and target forest defenders. (seen it).

3. if the corporate masters behind the white house and the war on iraq get their way, these 'contractors' will bring their fresh 'interrogation' skills back home to the 'urban environment' of america.

quick, somebody give me a pro-bush sign!

here's more 02.May.2004 23:06

guardian repost

 http://www.guardian.co.uk/Iraq/Story/0,2763,1206725,00.html

US military in torture scandal

Use of private contractors in Iraqi jail interrogations highlighted by inquiry into abuse of prisoners

Julian Borger in Washington
Friday April 30, 2004
The Guardian

Graphic photographs showing the torture and sexual abuse of Iraqi prisoners in a US-run prison outside Baghdad emerged yesterday from a military inquiry which has left six soldiers facing a possible court martial and a general under investigation.

THE SCANDAL HAS ALSO BROUGHT TO LIGHT THE GROWING AND LARGELY UNREGULATED ROLE OF PRIVATE CONTRACTORS IN THE INTERROGATION OF DETAINEES.

According to lawyers for some of the soldiers, they claimed to be acting in part under the instruction of mercenary interrogators hired by the Pentagon.

US military investigators discovered the photographs, which include images of a hooded prisoner with wires fixed to his body, and nude inmates piled in a human pyramid.

THE PICTURES, WHICH WERE OBTAINED BY AN AMERICAN TV NETWORK, ALSO SHOW A DOG ATTACKING A PRISONER AND OTHER INMATES BEING FORCED TO SIMULATE SEX WITH EACH OTHER. IT IS THOUGHT THE ABUSES TOOK PLACE IN NOVEMBER AND DECEMBER LAST YEAR. [i wonder if this 'simulated sex' thing is just another coverup of forced rape of these people.]

The pictures from Abu Ghraib prison have shocked the US army.

Brigadier General Mark Kimmitt, deputy director of operations for the US military in Iraq, expressed his embarrassment and regret for what had happened. He told the CBS current affairs programme 60 Minutes II: "If we can't hold ourselves up as an example of how to treat people with dignity and respect, we can't ask that other nations do that to our soldiers."

Gen Kimmitt said the investigation began in January when an American soldier reported the abuse and turned over evidence that included photographs. "That soldier said: 'There are some things going on here that I can't live with'."

The inquiry had centred on the 800th Brigade which is based in Uniondale, New York.

The US army confirmed that the general in charge of Abu Ghraib jail is facing disciplinary measures and that six low-ranking soldiers have been charged with abusing and sexually humiliating detainees.

Lawyers for the soldiers argue they are being made scapegoats for a rogue military prison system in which mercenaries give orders without legal accountability.

A MILITARY REPORT INTO THE ABU GHRAIB CASE - PARTS OF WHICH WERE MADE AVAILABLE TO THE GUARDIAN - MAKES IT CLEAR THAT PRIVATE CONTRACTORS WERE SUPERVISING INTERROGATIONS IN THE PRISON, which was notorious for torture and executions under Saddam Hussein.

ONE CIVILIAN CONTRACTOR WAS ACCUSED OF RAPING A YOUNG MALE PRISONER BUT HAS NOT BEEN CHARGED BECAUSE MILITARY LAW HAS NO JURISDICTION OVER HIM.

Hired guns from a wide array of private security firms are playing a central role in the US-led occupation of Iraq.

The killing of four private contractors in Falluja on March 31 led to the current siege of the city.

But this is the first time the privatisation of interrogation and intelligence-gathering has come to light. The investigation names two US contractors, CACI International Inc and the Titan Corporation, for their involvement in the functioning of Abu Ghraib.

Titan, based in San Diego, describes itself as a "a leading provider of comprehensive information and communications products, solutions and services for national security". It recently won a big contract for providing translation services to the US army, and its involvement in Abu Ghraib is believed to have been to provide translators.

CACI, which has headquarters in Virginia, claims on its website to "help America's intelligence community collect, analyse and share global information in the war on terrorism".

Neither responded to calls for comment yesterday.

According to the military report on Abu Ghraib, both played an important role at the prison.

At one point, the investigators say: "A CACI instructor was terminated because he allowed and/or instructed MPs who were not trained in interrogation techniques to facilitate interrogations by setting conditions which were neither authorised [nor] in accordance with applicable regulations/policy."

Colonel Jill Morgenthaler, speaking for central command, told the Guardian: "One contractor was originally included with six soldiers, accused for his treatment of the prisoners, but we had no jurisdiction over him. It was left up to the contractor on how to deal with him."

SHE DID NOT SPECIFY THE ACCUSATION FACING THE CONTRACTOR, BUT ACCORDING TO SEVERAL SOURCES WITH DETAILED KNOWLEDGE OF THE CASE, HE RAPED AN IRAQI INMATE IN HIS MID-TEENS.

COL MORGENTHALER SAID THE CHARGES AGAINST THE SIX SOLDIERS INCLUDED "INDECENT ACTS, FOR ORDERING DETAINEES TO PUBLICLY MASTURBATE; MALTREATMENT, FOR NON-PHYSICAL ABUSE, PILING INMATES INTO NUDE PYRAMIDS AND TAKING PICTURES OF THEM NUDE; BATTERY, FOR SHOVING AND STEPPING ON DETAINEES; DERELICTION OF DUTY; AND CONSPIRACY TO MALTREAT DETAINEES".

One of the soldiers, Staff Sgt Chip Frederick is accused of posing in a photograph sitting on top of a detainee, committing an indecent act and with assault for striking detainees - and ordering detainees to strike each other.

He told CBS: "We had no support, no training whatsoever. And I kept asking my chain of command for certain things ... like rules and regulations."

His lawyer, Gary Myers, told the Guardian that Sgt Frederick had not had the opportunity to read the Geneva Conventions before being put on guard duty, a task he was not trained to perform.

Mr Myers said the role of the private contractors in Abu Ghraib are central to the case.

"I think it creates a laissez faire environment that is completely inappropriate. If these individuals engaged in crimes against an Iraq national - who has jurisdiction over such a crime?", Mr Myers asked.

"It's insanity," said Robert Baer, a former CIA agent, who has examined the case, and is concerned about the private contractors' free-ranging role. "These are rank amateurs and there is no legally binding law on these guys as far as I could tell. Why did they let them in the prison?"

The Pentagon had no comment on the role of contractors at Abu Ghraib, saying that an inquiry was still in progress.

and... 03.May.2004 15:33

this thing here

... given the fact that the "contractors" operate without any supervision or regulation, is it any wonder that THEY, of all possible people, were the ones to carry out the "interrogations"? that's not a mistake. that's a deliberate move on the part of the bush admin. they know the CIA and military intel cannot get away with the same kinds of things unregulated "contractors" can.