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Author of the Patriot Act, Professor Viet Dinh to speak in Portland 4/15/03 7pm

Civil Liberties after 9/11 and the Patriot Act
Free CLE Presentation
April 15, 2004, 7 to 9 p.m.
Oregon Convention Center
Portland, Oregon
Please join us on April 15 for this special presentation on civil liberties after 9/11 and the USA Patriot Act.

The keynote speaker is the author of the Patriot Act, Professor Viet Dinh, a former assistant attorney general under President George W. Bush and currently a law professor at Georgetown University. Also present will be Timothy J. Keefer, a chief counsel in the Department of Homeland Security in Washington.

"9/11 will reverberate through our country for decades, perhaps most notably in its impact on civil liberties," says William G. Carter, President of the Oregon State Bar. "It is imperative that we have a dialogue about these issues, and to have the author of such a powerful instrument here to discuss it with Oregonians is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity."

Professor Dinh's speech will be followed by a lively panel discussion about the Act's impact on civil liberties. Panelists include Timothy J. Keefer, Chief Counsel, Office for Civil Rights and Civil Liberties, U.S. Department of Homeland Security; Earl Blumenauer, United States Congressman; Karin Immergut, United States Attorney for Oregon; and Charlie Hinkle, a prominent Portland civil rights attorney. Christy George, an award-winning journalist with Oregon Public Broadcasting, will moderate the panel discussion.

Professor Dinh immigrated with his mother and siblings to the U.S. from Vietnam when the Communist Party took control and began its program of reeducation. Professor Dinh's father was not able to join his family in the United States until 8 years after their immigration, due to his imprisonment and "reeducation." Professor Dinh spent much of his youth in Oregon, and even worked here as a berry picker. Professor Dinh graduated from Harvard Law School and clerked for Justice Sandra Day O'Connor of the U.S. Supreme Court. Professor Dinh also worked for Special Prosecutor Kenneth Starr during the Whitewater investigation.

The Civil Rights Section of the Oregon State Bar is organizing the event. It is a free CLE presentation and has been approved for 1.75 CLE credits. Attorneys who want CLE credits will need to sign an attendance sheet at the door. If you have questions, please contact Katelyn S. Oldham at  katelyn@jdsnyder.com.

Source:
OOPS Date is 4/15/04 07.Apr.2004 20:08

Dire Wolf

sorry about that

Author of the Patriot Act??? 08.Apr.2004 00:37

Just In Time

I think it time to show said author just what we think of the "Patriot" Act.

When was the Patriot Act first drafted? 08.Apr.2004 03:31

Dirtgardener

Many have commented how quickly the Patriot Act was presented after the WTC fell. The document (H.R. 3162) is approx. 99 full pages and it came out 10/24/01, just six weeks after --- Or was it actually scripted before Aug.-Sept. 2001 and was waiting for an opportunity to be accepted?

STRANGEST ACRONYM: USA Patriot =
Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism
____________________________________


the long version of the first portion of the USA Patriot Act
______________________
107th CONGRESS

1st Session
H. R. 3162
IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES
October 24, 2001

Received

AN ACT

To deter and punish terrorist acts in the United States and around the world, to enhance law enforcement investigatory tools, and for other purposes. Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,
SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE AND TABLE OF CONTENTS.
(a) SHORT TITLE- This Act may be cited as the `Uniting and Strengthening America by Providing Appropriate Tools Required to Intercept and Obstruct Terrorism (USA PATRIOT ACT) Act of 2001'. (b) TABLE OF CONTENTS- The table of contents for this Act is as follows:
Sec. 1. Short title and table of contents.
Sec. 2. Construction; severability.
TITLE I--ENHANCING DOMESTIC SECURITY AGAINST TERRORISM
Sec. 101. Counterterrorism fund.
Sec. 102. Sense of Congress condemning discrimination against Arab and Muslim Americans.
Sec. 103. Increased funding for the technical support center at the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Sec. 104. Requests for military assistance to enforce prohibition in certain emergencies.
Sec. 105. Expansion of National Electronic Crime Task Force Initiative.
Sec. 106. Presidential authority.

TITLE II--ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE PROCEDURES
Sec. 201. Authority to intercept wire, oral, and electronic communications relating to terrorism.
Sec. 202. Authority to intercept wire, oral, and electronic communications relating to computer fraud and abuse offenses.
Sec. 203. Authority to share criminal investigative information.
Sec. 204. Clarification of intelligence exceptions from limitations on interception and disclosure of wire, oral, and electronic communications.
Sec. 205. Employment of translators by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.
Sec. 206. Roving surveillance authority under the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act of 1978.
Sec. 207. Duration of FISA surveillance of non-United States persons who are agents of a foreign power.
Sec. 208. Designation of judges.
Sec. 209. Seizure of voice-mail messages pursuant to warrants.

A small benefit of Patriot Act: Sibel Edmonds 08.Apr.2004 03:36

Dirtgardener

Sibel Edmonds, a former translator in the FBI's language division may have been hired because of the Patriot Act.

Edmonds spoke out against the FBI interferring with the work of their own translators and recently accused National Security Advisor Dr. Condoleeza Rice of lying when she stated that she had no idea that planes could be used as missiles.

July 2003 article:
 http://www.cbsnews.com/stories/2002/10/25/60minutes/main526954.shtml


under the Patriot Act:
TITLE I--ENHANCING DOMESTIC SECURITY AGAINST TERRORISM

TITLE II--ENHANCED SURVEILLANCE PROCEDURES

Sec. 205. Employment of translators by the Federal Bureau of Investigation.