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McCain Wants WMD Inquiry

In an interview with The Associated Press, McCain said he believes the public needs an assessment that won't be clouded by partisan division. The Arizona senator said he is seeking a full-scale look not only at apparently botched intelligence on Iraq's weapons capabilities, but also flawed estimations of Iraq, North Korea and Libya and the faulty assessments from other Western intelligence services.
McCain Wants WMD Inquiry

By CBS News/Associated Press

Friday 30 January 2004

Parting company with many of his fellow Republicans, Sen. John McCain said Thursday he wants an independent commission to take a sweeping look at recent intelligence failures.

The White House has dismissed the proposal, saying the CIA is committed to reviewing the intelligence behind claims that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. The Bush administration also argues that the weapons search is not yet complete.

Senate Intelligence Committee Chairman Pat Roberts, R-Kan., has expressed frustration with those who suggest an outside investigation is needed before his committee has a chance to complete an inquiry now underway. Senate Armed Service Chairman John Warner, R-Va., supports letting the committee finish its work.

In an interview with The Associated Press, McCain said he believes the public needs an assessment that won't be clouded by partisan division. The Arizona senator said he is seeking a full-scale look not only at apparently botched intelligence on Iraq's weapons capabilities, but also flawed estimations of Iraq, North Korea and Libya and the faulty assessments from other Western intelligence services.

"I am absolutely convinced that one is necessary," McCain said, "because this is a very serious issue and we need to not only know what happened, but know what steps are necessary to prevent the United States from ever being misinformed again."

McCain's comments come less than one week after the CIA's lead weapons inspector, David Kay, left his position and began stating publicly that purported weapons of mass destruction didn't exist.

The House and Senate intelligence committees that have been looking into the issue for the past seven months have unearthed failures in prewar intelligence similar to those identified by Kay, The Washington Post reported Friday.

The newspaper quoted unidentified congressional officials as saying the committees believe CIA analysts never seriously considered the possibility that Saddam no longer possessed weapons of mass destruction.

But Republicans and Democrats on the two intelligence committees disagree over whether the fault lies with the analysts or with the policymakers that used murky intelligence as a basis for war.

Democratic presidential candidates Sen. John Edwards, Sen. John Kerry, and Howard Dean also called for an independent investigation during a debate held Thursday in South Carolina.

National security adviser Condoleezza Rice reiterated that opposition Thursday, saying on national television that existing efforts to learn the extent of Saddam's weapons arsenal are sufficient while downplaying the discrepancy between prewar intelligence and what has (or hasn't) been found in Iraq.

"I think that what we have is evidence that there are differences between what we knew going in and what we found on the ground. That's not surprising. " National security adviser Condoleezza Rice said on CBS News' Early Show. "In a country that was as closed and secretive as Iraq, a country that was doing everything that it could to deceive the United Nations, to deceive the world. I would remind people that in Libya and Iran, we have found we probably significantly underestimated the significance of those weapons of mass destruction programs. So in part, this is a problem of dealing with very closed societies that are doing everything that they can to hide the extent and nature of their programs."

When asked on NBC's Today Show if she thought Americans have a legitimate concern about whether intelligence was manipulated to justify the decision to go to war, Rice replied, "The president's judgment to go to the war was based on the fact that Saddam Hussein for 12 years had defied U.N. resolutions" regarding his stock of weapons.

She added that the administration went to war, because Saddam "had been considered a danger for a long time and it was time to take care of that danger."

In a speech in Merrimack, N.H. on Thursday, Mr. Bush called the invasion of Iraq a "war for our security" and said he welcomed a debate over his reasons for launching the war, in which at least 519 Americans have died.

"We'll debate about the decision, and I look forward to those discussions with the American people," Mr. Bush said. "I'm absolutely convinced it was the right thing to do. And I look forward to explaining it clearly to the American people."

Kay and some Democrats, including Senate minority leader Tom Daschle, D-S.D., have also stated the need for an outside investigation into the intelligence community. Along with the Senate inquiry, several retired intelligence officers have delivered a review to CIA Director George Tenet on the performance of the CIA and other agencies.

McCain, who was one of the loudest voices in a successful campaign to form a commission on the Sept. 11 attacks, said he spoke to administration officials, but doesn't know what if any action the White House will take. McCain believes the investigation would take over a year, removing the findings from election-year politics.

McCain said the commission should consider a series of questions: Were the estimates wrong? If so, why? Who is responsible? What steps need to be taken to ensure that the president has accurate intelligence information?

Names McCain suggested for the commission include former House Speaker Tom Foley, D-Wash., former Secretary of State and Treasury George Shultz, former Secretary of State Lawrence Eagleburger and former national security adviser Brent Scowcroft.

homepage: homepage: http://truthout.org/docs_04/013104A.shtml
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hmm... 31.Jan.2004 11:55

this thing here

>Parting company with many of his fellow Republicans, Sen. John McCain said Thursday he wants an independent commission to take a sweeping look at recent intelligence failures.

The White House has dismissed the proposal, saying the CIA is committed to reviewing the intelligence behind claims that Iraq had weapons of mass destruction. The Bush administration also argues that the weapons search is not yet complete.<

... "intelligence failures". isn't that convenient.

so that's why the bush admin. can't find those WMD's. because of "intelligence failures".

so that's why the bush admin. unilaterally, and without u.n. approval, invaded iraq. because the "failed intelligence" told the bush admin. that iraq was a threat when in reality it wasn't at all. as if to say, the bush admin. wouldn't have invaded if it had known the true state of iraqi WMD's. sure....

so that's why the bush admin. couldn't allow the inspections to actually work, because the "failed intelligence" told them that iraq was an imminent threat that needed immediate action, rather than more inspections to acertain just what exactly iraq was up to. "no, there's not time to get a verifiable answer about iraq's WMD's. we must invade immediately to eliminate the imminent threat..."

i see... so that's why vice president cheney went to visit CIA intelligence analysts to put pressure on them to create intelligence reports that backed up his claims about iraq having WMD's. so that's why rumsfeld set up his own cherry picking team in the pentagon basement because he was so frustrated with the "failed intelligence" coming from the CIA. the "failed intelligence" which was not meeting up with the bush admin.'s public statements...

damn straight the intelligence "failed" the bush admin. because it didn't give the bush admin. the answers they WANTED.

this whole "intelligence failure" line is simply a very clever attempt to deflect blame and obfuscate reality.

let's break this down. it was NOT the intelligence which told the bush admin. that iraq had WMD's and was an imminent threat. it was the bush admin. which WANTED THE INTELLIGENCE TO PROVE THAT CLAIM FOR THEM. THAT'S why cheney went for "friendly" visits to the CIA. THAT'S why rumsfeld set up his very own intelligence cherry picking team. IF the intelligence was giving the bush admin. what it wanted, WHY would dick and don have to do these special things?

this statement, "iraq has WMD's and is an imminent threat" was a deliberate invention of the white house, to be used for manipulative political purposes. it was NOT a cold, objective intelligence assessment, based in facts. to investigate the "intelligence failures" is a worthless and futile exercise. could we go barking up the wrong tree a little more, for fucks sake? what needs to be investigated is THE WHITE HOUSE AND IT'S MACHINATIONS. this is white house all the way, from start to finish.

and if you're in the CIA and reading this, time to get some cajones. you've been used and abused big time by the bush admin. and for you just sit there and take it from behind without so much as peep of protest is beyond me. if you have any pride in your work as an analyst, if you have any pride in your role in helping your country, time to speak out. if not, you'll be used and abused again and again, like some cheap whore...

Why can't they find the weapons of mass destruction? 31.Jan.2004 13:16

Bird Dog

Because they have been unable to bring then into the country.
Kind of like droping a bag of drugs into the desk drawer of the person you want to destroy.
They use this kind of trick all the time.

The question is will the American wake up before it is too late?